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I have an object, written as follows:

var color = "darkred";
var source = "person1"; //this is generated elsewhere and changes
var target = "work23"; //this is generated elsewhere and changes

link = {
              color: color,
              source: source,
              target: target,
              value:1
            }

This object gets added to an array, links, as follows via a function that is meant to check first to see if it already exists in the array:

var links = [];
function person_linker(link) {

  for (var key in links) {
    if (links[key].source === link.source && links[key].target === link.target) {
    }
    else
    {
      links.push(link);
    }
  }
}

The problem I'm running into is that it doesn't seem to actually do this check and just adds the link object for however many keys are in links. Everything I've read indicates that writing the if statement is how such a check is made, but most of that information assumes you're only going after one value per key. It's obvious that && is not the way to go, but I've tried separating the two out, doing find, indexOf, and filter statements, and nothing seems to work. The code as is technically returns what I want but because it allows multiple link objects to be added to links it eats up memory when it does the check and creates spurious entries -- with the potential of tens of thousands of extra lines added to the object. What am I doing wrong, here? I'm sure it's a simple fix, but I cannot for the life of me figure out what Javascript wants.

  • Can you clarify the logic according to which items should be pushed into the array or not? – Mitya Nov 29 '20 at 10:27
  • Sure. Basically what I want to do is check to see if the source and target values already exist for the same row in the array. If they do, I don't want to add the item but if they don't, then I do. So, for example, a source of "person1" and target of "target2" would mean the item should be added but a source of "person1" and target of "target1" would not. – medievalmatt Nov 29 '20 at 11:15
2

You need to use array filter methods. Here is the example where I use once to check if there is already added link. Also it will be more efficient, because it will skip all of the unnecessary checks after the presented link found in links array.

See more here: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Array/some

let color = "darkred";
let source = "person1"; //this is generated elsewhere and changes
let target = "work23"; //this is generated elsewhere and changes

let link = {
  color: color,
  source: source,
  target: target,
  value: 1,
};

const links = [];

function person_linker(link) {
  const linkAlreadyAdded = links.some(presentedLink => {
    return (presentedLink.source === link.source) &&
      (presentedLink.target === link.target)
  });

  if (linkAlreadyAdded) {
    console.log('Check failed.');
  } else {
    console.log('Check passed.');
    links.push(link);
  }
}
console.log(links);
person_linker(link);
console.log(links);
person_linker(link);
console.log(links);

  • This solved my problem. I have used find elsewhere, but for whatever reason I didn't even think about some. One question, though (and this may be why I didn't think of it): am I right in thinking .find finds the first instance that's true, .some finds every instance that's true, and .every requires every instance to be true? My understanding is that's how .find and .every work, but I wanted to make sure I'm understanding how .some fits in and how it differs from .filter in that case. – medievalmatt Nov 29 '20 at 22:59
  • @medievalmatt In short: .find returns element found; .some returns true (read as boolean) if it find element accepted by criteria; .every returns boolean whatever all of the elements match criteria. – Zekfad Nov 30 '20 at 12:38

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