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When using seq to generate an ip address, I use seq 0 255 and it generate the last octet. How can I transition this so it will generate all the other octets and their possible combinations (over 4 million combinations). Any help to start would be appreciated

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  • 2
    I suggest to use awk with four loops.
    – Cyrus
    Nov 29, 2020 at 23:27
  • If time is an issue, I recommend using C.
    – Cyrus
    Nov 30, 2020 at 0:02

3 Answers 3

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If you were looking for a bash solution:

for h in {1..255}; do for i in {1..255}; do for j in {1..255}; do for k in {1..255}; do echo "$h.$i.$j.$k"; done; done; done; done

Or the multi-line version

for h in {1..255}
  do for i in {1..255}
    do for j in {1..255}
      do for k in {1..255}
        do echo "$h.$i.$j.$k"
      done
    done
  done
done

Or if you are really intent on using seq

for h in `seq 255`; do for i in `seq 255`; do for j in `seq 255`; do for k in `seq 255`; do echo "$h.$i.$j.$k"; done; done; done; done
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With awk and four loops:

awk 'BEGIN{OFS="."; for(h=0;h<256;h++){for(i=0;i<256;i++){for(j=0;j<256;j++){for(k=0;k<256;k++){print h,i,j,k}}}}}'

With C and four loops:

Put this a file with name ipgen.c:

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
  int h, i, j, k;

  for (h = 0; h < 256; h++) {
    for (i = 0; i < 256; i++) {
      for (j = 0; j < 256; j++) {
        for (k = 0; k < 256; k++) {
          printf("%d.%d.%d.%d\n", h, i, j, k);
        }
      }
    }
  }
  return 0;
}

Compile it: gcc ipgen.c -o ipgen

Start it: ./ipgen

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  • Your first implementation was actually what I just managed to make work, your first comment regarding four loops made sense.
    – user9543040
    Nov 30, 2020 at 0:39
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For speed I'd vote for a 4-way awk/for loop (per Cyrus comment), but thought I'd look at a recursive function:

tuple () {

local level=$1                                 # number of tuples to generate
local max=$2                                   # assume tuples are numbered 1 to max
local in=$3                                    # current tuple from parent

local pfx="."                                  # for all but the topmost call we append a period on the front of our loop counter

[[ -z "${in}" ]] && pfx=""                     # topmost call appends no prefix

local i
local out

for (( i=1 ; i<=${max} ; i++ ))
do
    out="${in}${pfx}${i}"

    if [[ "${level}" -eq 1 ]]                  # if we've reached the bottom of our function calls
    then
         echo "${out}"                         # print our latest string
    else
        tuple $((level-1)) "${max}" "${out}"   # otherwise recurse with the latest string
    fi
done
}

To build a 3-tuple with values ranging from 1 to 2:

$ tuple 3 2
1.1.1
1.1.2
1.2.1
1.2.2
2.1.1
2.1.2
2.2.1
2.2.2

To build a 3-tuple with values ranging from 1 to 4:

$ tuple 3 4
1.1.1
1.1.2
1.1.3
1.1.4
1.2.1
 ...
4.3.4
4.4.1
4.4.2
4.4.3
4.4.4

To build a 4-tuple with values ranging from 1 to 255 (keep in mind this is NOT going to be fast since we're making a LOT of bash-level calls):

$ tuple 4 255
1.1.1.1
1.1.1.2
1.1.1.3
1.1.1.4
1.1.1.5
1.1.1.6
1.1.1.7
1.1.1.8
1.1.1.9
1.1.1.10
... if you let it run long enough ...
255.255.255.250
255.255.255.251
255.255.255.252
255.255.255.253
255.255.255.254
255.255.255.255

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