1

I'm trying to make a "tuple generator" that takes a number, and returns a tuple with this number while each element of it is incremented by one. Of course I am aware that this is not the real application of tuples, but I wanted to try it to learn something new. Here is what I have:

template<int N>
auto getTupleN(int start){
    return std::tuple_cat(std::tuple<int>(start), getTupleN<N-1>(start+1));
}

template<>
auto getTupleN<0>(int start){
    return std::make_tuple(start);
}

Now, it works perfectly and I can use std::get to access elements of the tuple. However, I can't deduce the type.

I would like to write a function with the arrow notation to be sure that the function returns what I would like it to return and that I have a good grasp of the idea of templates. This is what I would like to have (It doesn't work of course, for various reasons):

template<int N>
//    error: ‘getTupleN’ was not declared in this scope
auto getTupleN(int start) -> decltype(std::tuple_cat(std::tuple<int>, getTupleN<N-1>)){
    return std::tuple_cat(std::tuple<int>(start), getTupleN<N-1>(start+1));
}

template<>
//     error: expected initializer before ‘<’ token
auto getTupleN<0>(int start) -> std::tuple<int>{
    return std::make_tuple(start);
}

I think it should now be understandable what my problem is - how can I rewrite this definition so It uses the arrow notation, so I'm sure It returns what I want?

Edit. So I have used the idea of the first answer and the errors I get are:

error: ‘getTupleN’ was not declared in this scope
auto getTupleN(int start) -> decltype(std::tuple_cat(std::tuple<int>(start), getTupleN<N-1>(start+1))){

error: expected initializer before ‘<’ token
auto getTupleN<0>(int start) -> std::tuple<int>{
6
  • 1
    please don't say "of course" when it isnt "of course". Better incldue the error message in the question Nov 30, 2020 at 18:39
  • @idclev463035818 Ok, I have edited the question Nov 30, 2020 at 18:42
  • what you added is a response to an answer, that should perhaps be a comment to that answer. I was asking to include the error of your code. You currently have some code without error message and an error message without the corresponding code. Thats a bit confusing Nov 30, 2020 at 18:43
  • @idclev463035818 the corresponding code is shown below the error message Nov 30, 2020 at 18:44
  • the line below that error message is incomplete code. Nov 30, 2020 at 18:45

3 Answers 3

2

Simply put, you can't do that. It's the chicken and egg.

[basic.scope.pdecl]

1 The point of declaration for a name is immediately after its complete declarator ([dcl.decl]) and before its initializer (if any), except as noted below.

The declarator of a function (template) is not complete without the trailing return type. As far as the declaration goes, until you specify the trailing return type, there is no such thing as getTupleN declared (and so you can't use it to declare the return type). Even though the paragraphs under the general rule contain exceptions, there is no exception that makes your code well-formed.

3
  • In terms of good practice then, should such functions be avoided if I need to be sure of the return type? I know it's a rare case, but It is strange to me that a compiler can figure something out while I can't. Nov 30, 2020 at 18:55
  • @KarolSzustakowski - No, it's not a bad practice. One of the motivating reasons for return type deduction for general functions, is that it simplifies certain use cases like that one you have. It's not a silver bullet (and can harm SFINAE friendliness, so you may not want to use it at times), but if it fits your needs, it's there to be applied. Nov 30, 2020 at 18:58
  • 1
    @KarolSzustakowski: "I need to be sure of the return type". Not sure how auto f() -> decltype(ret) { return ret; } is more "sure" than auto f() { return ret; }.
    – Jarod42
    Nov 30, 2020 at 19:06
2

Syntax should be:

decltype(std::tuple_cat(std::tuple<int>(start), getTupleN<N-1>(start+1)))

but issue is that return type depends on itself (and final specialization).

If you want to provide return type, you probably have to create helper traits:

template <std::size_t I, typename T>
using type_t = T;

template <typename Seq> struct int_tuple_impl;

template <std::size_t ... Is>
struct int_tuple_impl<std::index_sequence<Is...>>
{
    using type = std::tuple<type_t<Is, int>...>;  
};

template <std::size_t N>
using int_tuple = typename int_tuple_impl<std::make_index_sequence<N>>::type;

And so

emplate<int N>
auto getTupleN(int start) -> int_tuple<N + 1>
{
    return std::tuple_cat(std::tuple<int>(start), getTupleN<N-1>(start+1));
}

template<>
auto getTupleN<0>(int start) -> int_tuple<1> // or directly std::tuple<int>
{
    return std::make_tuple(start);
}
2
0

You don't need to specify the return type:

#include <tuple>
#include <utility>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>

template<size_t ... Is>
auto getTupleN(size_t start, std::index_sequence<Is...>) {
    return std::make_tuple((start + Is)...);
}

template<size_t N>
auto getTuple() {
    return getTupleN(N, std::make_index_sequence<N>());
}

int main() {
    auto res = getTuple<3>();
    // prints 3 4 5
    std::cout << std::get<0>(res) << ' ' <<
        std::get<1>(res) << ' ' << std::get<2>(res) << std::endl;
}

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