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I'm reading up on blockingqueue, executoreserivce and the producer-consumer paradigm. I want to have a changing number of producers, and changing number of consumers. Each producer will append to the queue, and the consumers will consume the messages and process them. The question I have is - how do the producers know that the consumers are done, and no more messages will enter the queue? I thought to add a counter into my main thread. When a producer is started, I will increment the counter and that when each producer ends, they will decrement the int. My consumers will be able to know the counter, and when it reaches 0, and no more elements in the queue, they can die.

Another general question in terms of syncing the work - should the main thread read the contents of the queue, and add executers for each message, or is it best practice to have the threads know this logic and decide on their own when to die?

When the system starts up, I receive a number that decides how many producers will start. Each producer will generate a random set of numbers into the queue. The consumers will print these numbers to a log. The issue that I'm having is, that once I know that the last producer pushed the last number in, I still don't understand how to let the consumers know that there won't be any more numbers coming in, and they should shut down.

How do the consumers know when the producers are done?

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  • How can this design know that there won't be new producers coming in the future? Like at the beginning there are no producers at all, the system is ready to shut down. You may want to start putting together a [mve], which could be discussed here (if it doesn't work) or on codereview.stackexchange.com (if it works, but you are uncertain about it). Right now there are too many questions for a single post, and they are not necessarily the ones which you would ask in the course of actual development. – tevemadar Dec 1 '20 at 9:53
  • (Sorry, [mve] wanted to be minimal reproducible example) – tevemadar Dec 1 '20 at 10:17
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One elegant solution to this problem is to use the PoisonPill pattern. Here is an example of how it works. All you need to know in this case, is the number of producers.

Edit: I updated the code to clear the queue when last consumer finishes the work.

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.concurrent.BlockingQueue;
import java.util.concurrent.CompletableFuture;
import java.util.concurrent.LinkedBlockingQueue;
import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicInteger;

public class PoisonPillsTests {

    interface Message {

    }

    interface PoisonPill extends Message {
        PoisonPill INSTANCE = new PoisonPill() {
        };
    }

    static class TextMessage implements Message {

        private final String text;

        public TextMessage(String text) {
            this.text = text;
        }

        public String getText() {
            return text;
        }

        @Override
        public String toString() {
            return text;
        }
    }

    static class Producer implements Runnable {

        private final String producerName;
        private final AtomicInteger producersCount;
        private final BlockingQueue<Message> messageBlockingQueue;

        public Producer(String producerName, BlockingQueue<Message> messageBlockingQueue, AtomicInteger producersCount) {
            this.producerName = producerName;
            this.messageBlockingQueue = messageBlockingQueue;
            this.producersCount = producersCount;
        }

        @Override
        public void run() {
            try {
                for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
                    messageBlockingQueue.put(new TextMessage("Producer " + producerName + " message " + i));
                }
                if (producersCount.decrementAndGet() <= 0) {
                    //we need this producersCount so that the producers to produce a single poison pill
                    messageBlockingQueue.put(PoisonPill.INSTANCE);
                }
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                throw new RuntimeException("Producer interrupted", e);
            }
        }
    }

    static class Consumer implements Runnable {

        private final AtomicInteger consumersCount;
        private final AtomicInteger consumedMessages;
        private final BlockingQueue<Message> messageBlockingQueue;

        public Consumer(BlockingQueue<Message> messageBlockingQueue, AtomicInteger consumersCount, AtomicInteger consumedMessages) {
            this.messageBlockingQueue = messageBlockingQueue;
            this.consumersCount = consumersCount;
            this.consumedMessages = consumedMessages;
        }

        @Override
        public void run() {
            try {
                while (true) {
                    Message message = null;
                    message = messageBlockingQueue.take();

                    if (message instanceof PoisonPill) {
                        //we put back the poison pill so that to be consumed by the next consumer
                        messageBlockingQueue.put(message);
                        break;
                    } else {
                        consumedMessages.incrementAndGet();
                        System.out.println("Consumer got message " + message);
                    }
                }
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                throw new RuntimeException("Consumer interrupted", e);
            } finally {
                if (consumersCount.decrementAndGet() <= 0) {
                    System.out.println("Last consumer, clearing the queue");
                    messageBlockingQueue.clear();
                }
            }
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        final AtomicInteger producerCount = new AtomicInteger(4);
        final AtomicInteger consumersCount = new AtomicInteger(2);
        final AtomicInteger consumedMessages = new AtomicInteger();
        BlockingQueue<Message> messageBlockingQueue = new LinkedBlockingQueue<>();


        List<CompletableFuture<Void>> tasks = new ArrayList<>();
        for (int i = 0; i < producerCount.get(); i++) {
            tasks.add(CompletableFuture.runAsync(new Producer("" + (i + 1), messageBlockingQueue, producerCount)));
        }

        for (int i = 0; i < consumersCount.get(); i++) {
            tasks.add(CompletableFuture.runAsync(new Consumer(messageBlockingQueue, consumersCount, consumedMessages)));
        }

        CompletableFuture.allOf(tasks.toArray(new CompletableFuture[0])).join();

        System.out.println("Consumed " + consumedMessages + " messages");

    }
}
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  • This is a very nice and elegant solution! The question I have is - maybe instead of taking the message and putting it back in the queue for other consumers to get it, can we have the main thread start a thread pool for the consumers, and give it control of the threads? Meaning, if I choose to stop execution and not consume any more messages from the queue, I can stop all threads from main? So this would mean the the main would have some kind of counter, that producers increment and consumers decrement. When it's 0 AND remaining producers is also 0, it can issue KILL to all remaining threads? – Ron Dec 1 '20 at 12:02
  • I don't know what do you want to achieve with this scenario. Off-course, you can have it, but then you don't decouple the producers from the consumers (you bind them by that counter). The idea of using the poison pill pattern, is to do this decoupling. Imagine, that instead of a blocking queue, you have a Kafka topic or RabbitMQ queue and the producers and consumers runs on different servers/JVM's, then this approach works in the same way. All you have to change is the way how you publish/consume data from the queue. – Octavian R. Dec 1 '20 at 13:06
  • @OctavianR. I see what you mean. So my following question would be - how will the last consumer know it's the last, and not push the message back to the queue? What I'm worried about in this scenario - is that in the end, we have a queue with an item - that's the poison pill. Which means that no new consumers will start because they will die with the first read of the queue... Is that correct? Can we eliminate this type of scenario? – Ron Dec 1 '20 at 13:14
  • @Ron I see your concern now. Please see the updated code. Now, the last consumer clears the queue before exit. – Octavian R. Dec 1 '20 at 14:12
  • @OctavianR. very nice and coherent. One question about the last line: CompletableFuture.allOf(tasks.toArray(new CompletableFuture[0])).join(); This is to get all of the results of the tasks when they finish, correct? So if I were to want to get these results, I would need the CompleteableFuture array to be accessible, correct? When I make the following change to the code, it never returns. Any idea why? CompletableFuture[] futures = new CompletableFuture[0]; CompletableFuture.allOf(tasks.toArray(futures)).join(); – Ron Dec 2 '20 at 9:05
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When the producers are done, the last one can interrupt all consumers and (possibly) producers.

InterruptedException is thrown whenever a blocking call (be it put() or take()) is interruped by another thread via thread.interrupt(), where thread is the thread calling the method. When the last producer finishes, it can interrupt all other threads, which will result in all blocking methods throwing InterruptedException, allowing you to terminate the corresponding threads.

final BlockingQueue<T> queue = ...;
final List<Thread> threads = new ArrayList<>();

threads.add(new Producer1());
threads.add(new Producer2());
threads.add(new Consumer1());
threads.add(new Consumer2());
threads.forEach(Thread::start);

// Done by the last producer, or any other thread
threads.forEach(Thread::interrupt);

class Producer extends Thread {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        for (int i = 0; i < X; i++) {
            T element;
            // Produce element
            try {
                queue.put(element);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                break; // Optional, only if other producers may still be running and
                       // you want to stop them, or interruption is performed by
                       // a completely different thread
            }
        }
    }
}

class Consumer extends Thread {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        while (true) {
            T element;
            try {
                element = queue.take();
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                break;
            }
            // Consume element
        }
    }
}
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