104

My webpage has a 'skinny' list: for example, a list of 100 items of one word in length each. To reduce scrolling, I want to present this list in two or even four columns on the page. How should I do this with CSS?

<ul>
    <li>Item</li>
    <li>Item</li>
    <li>Item</li>
    <li>Item</li>
    <li>Item</li>
    <li>Item</li>
    <li>Item</li>
    <li>Item</li>
    <li>Item</li>
    <li>Item</li>
</ul>

I prefer the solution to be flexible so that if the list grows to 200 items, I don't have to do a lot of manual adjustments to accommodate the new list.

213

The CSS solution is: http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-multicol/

The browser support is exactly what you'd expect..

It works "everywhere" except Internet Explorer 9 or older: http://caniuse.com/multicolumn

ul {
    -moz-column-count: 4;
    -moz-column-gap: 20px;
    -webkit-column-count: 4;
    -webkit-column-gap: 20px;
    column-count: 4;
    column-gap: 20px;
}

See: http://jsfiddle.net/pdExf/

If IE support is required, you'll have to use JavaScript, for example:

http://welcome.totheinter.net/columnizer-jquery-plugin/

Another solution is to fallback to normal float: left for only IE. The order will be wrong, but at least it will look similar:

See: http://jsfiddle.net/NJ4Hw/

<!--[if lt IE 10]>
<style>
li {
    width: 25%;
    float: left
}
</style>
<![endif]-->

You could apply that fallback with Modernizr if you're already using it.

  • Is there a way to remove the top border on the first li in each column? – Yes Barry Aug 25 '14 at 21:49
  • 1
    This works great for a fixed space, but becomes an issue with responsive designs since the columns don't collapse like when using display:inline or inline-block. – unifiedac Feb 27 '15 at 20:29
  • 4
    Interesting fact: IE is the only major desktop browser to fully support this feature without prefixes (since IE10)... Oh, the irony... – NemoStein Apr 10 '15 at 5:25
  • 1
    It may be necessary for better cross browser support to include this additional property list-style-position: inside; which specifically addresses the problem pointed out by @vsync I believe. – ThisClark Jan 19 '17 at 15:33
  • 4
    @PrafullaKumarSahu: Try li { break-inside: avoid; }: jsfiddle.net/thirtydot/pdExf/903. I'm not too familiar with CSS columns, so there might be a better way. – thirtydot Mar 24 '17 at 15:10
16

If you are looking for a solution that works in IE as well, you could float the list elements to the left. However, this will result in a list that snakes around, like this:

item 1 | item 2 | item 3
item 4 | item 5

Instead of neat columns, like:

item 1 | item 4
item 2 | 
item 3 | 

The code to do that would be:

ul li {
  width:10em;
  float:left;
}

You could add a border-bottom to the lis to make the flow of the items from left to right more apparent.

  • while it might work for specific number of items, the result will not be pretty for just 2 items. – vsync Sep 12 '16 at 11:42
7

If you want a preset number of columns, you can use column-count and column-gap, as mentioned above.

However, if you want a single column with limited height that would break into more columns if needed, this can be achieved quite simply by changing display to flex.

This will not work on IE9 and some other old browsers. You can check support on Can I use

<style>
  ul {
    display: -ms-flexbox;           /* IE 10 */
    display: -webkit-flex;          /* Safari 6.1+. iOS 7.1+ */
    display: flex;
    -webkit-flex-flow: wrap column; /* Safari 6.1+ */
    flex-flow: wrap column;
    max-height: 150px;              /* Limit height to whatever you need */
  }
</style>

<ul>
    <li>Item</li>
    <li>Item</li>
    <li>Item</li>
    <li>Item</li>
    <li>Item</li>
    <li>Item</li>
    <li>Item</li>
    <li>Item</li>
    <li>Item</li>
    <li>Item</li>
</ul>

  • 1
    Very close to what I'm going after. The only downside is that the width of the columns doesn't adapt to the content (try with different length items). Not sure how is the column-width defined. Maybe the with of the first element? In any case, any pointers on how to overcome this? – jorgeh Mar 9 '18 at 5:57
3

This answer doesn't necessarily scale but only requires minor adjustments as the list grows. Semantically it might seem a little counter-intuitive since it is two lists, but aside from that it'll look the way you want in any browser ever made.

ul {
  float: left;
}

ul > li {
  width: 6em;
}
<!-- Column 1 -->
<ul>
  <li>Item 1</li>
  <li>Item 2</li>
  <li>Item 3</li>
</ul>
<!-- Column 2 -->
<ul>
  <li>Item 4</li>
  <li>Item 5</li>
  <li>Item 6</li>
</ul>

1

I've found that (currently) Chrome (Version 52.0.2743.116 m) has tons of quirks and issues with css column-count regarding overflow items and absolute positioned elements inside items, especially with some dimensions transitions..

it's a total mess and cannot be fix, so I tried tackling this through simple javascript, and had created a library which does that - https://github.com/yairEO/listBreaker

Demo page

  • I prefer the jQuery columnizer plugin, in my opinion it had better functionality for what I was doing (was able to sort alphabetically, descending or ascending, columns count, columns width & more). jQuery Columnizer - WelcomeToTheInter.Net – Brandito Oct 23 '17 at 5:51
  • @Brandito - well, the Columnizer code sure has more options, since it's almost a 1,000 lines of code, compared to mine which is about a 120 lines.. but does the job well – vsync Oct 23 '17 at 7:37
  • yes but my problem needed the list to stay as one list, what is more useful / needed depends on the use case. – Brandito Oct 23 '17 at 23:23
1

If you can support it CSS Grid is probably the cleanest way for making a one-dimensional list into a two column layout with responsive interiors.

ul {
  max-width: 400px;
  display: grid;
  grid-template-columns: 50% 50%;
  padding-left: 0;
  border: 1px solid blue;
}

li {
  list-style: inside;
  border: 1px dashed red;
  padding: 10px;
}
<ul>
  <li>1</li>
  <li>2</li>
  <li>3</li>
  <li>4</li>
  <li>5</li>
  <li>6</li>
  <li>7</li>
  <li>8</li>
  <li>9</li>
<ul>

These are the two key lines which will give you your 2 column layout

display: grid;
grid-template-columns: 50% 50%;
0

The mobile-first way is to use CSS Columns to create an experience for smaller screens then use Media Queries to increase the number of columns at each of your layout's defined breakpoints.

ul {
  column-count: 2;
  column-gap: 2rem;
}
@media screen and (min-width: 768px)) {
  ul {
    column-count: 3;
    column-gap: 5rem;
  }
}
<ul>
  <li>Item</li>
  <li>Item</li>
  <li>Item</li>
  <li>Item</li>
  <li>Item</li>
  <li>Item</li>
  <li>Item</li>
  <li>Item</li>
  <li>Item</li>
  <li>Item</li>
</ul>

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