How do I break out of a foreach loop in C# if one of the elements meets the requirement?

For example:

foreach(string s in sList){
      if(s.equals("ok")){
       //jump foreach loop and return true
     }
    //no item equals to "ok" then return false
}
  • Funny. In Python you'd simply do return "ok" in sList: - isn't there something comparable in C#? – Tim Pietzcker Jun 28 '11 at 16:39
  • 8
    @Tim Pietzcker: Of course there is, see spender's answer. In fact, after getting used to Linq, a lot of imperative code looks like cave drawings. – R0MANARMY Jun 28 '11 at 16:40

11 Answers 11

up vote 160 down vote accepted
foreach (string s in sList)
{
    if (s.equals("ok"))
        return true;
}

return false;

Alternatively, if you need to do some other things after you've found the item:

bool found = false;
foreach (string s in sList)
{
    if (s.equals("ok"))
    {
        found = true;
        break; // get out of the loop
    }
}

// do stuff

return found;
  • 6
    I would suggest the second example would be better rewritten to bool found = callFunctionInFirstCodeSnipper(list); // do stuff – ICR Jun 28 '11 at 17:01

Use break; and this will exit the foreach loop

You could avoid explicit loops by taking the LINQ route:

sList.Any(s => s.Equals("ok"))
  • 21
    or just use Contains("ok"). – Graham Clark Jun 28 '11 at 16:43
  • 6
    @Graham Clark: Contains assumes you're iterating over an ICollection<T>. Any would work on anything that of type IEnumerable<T>, and in this case question doesn't explicitly indicate what kind of collection it's iterating over (a List is a pretty fair guess though). – R0MANARMY Jun 28 '11 at 16:46
foreach (var item in listOfItems) {
  if (condition_is_met)
    // Any processing you may need to complete here...
    break; // return true; also works if you're looking to
           // completely exit this function.
}

Should do the trick. The break statement will just end the execution of the loop, while the return statement will obviously terminate the entire function. Judging from your question you may want to use the return true; statement.

You can use break which jumps out of the closest enclosing loop, or you can just directly return true

Use the 'break' statement. I find it humorous that the answer to your question is literally in your question! By the way, a simple Google search could have given you the answer.

  • This is the first google search result :) – phillyslick Aug 23 at 13:18

how about:

return(sList.Contains("ok"));

That should do the trick if all you want to do is check for an "ok" and return the answer ...

foreach(string s in sList)
{
    if(s.equals("ok"))
    {
             return true;
    }
}
return false;

Either return straight out of the loop:

foreach(string s in sList){
   if(s.equals("ok")){
      return true;
   }
}

// if you haven't returned by now, no items are "ok"
return false;

Or use break:

bool isOk = false;
foreach(string s in sList){
   if(s.equals("ok")){
      isOk = true;
      break; // jump out of the loop
   }
}

if(isOk)
{
    // do something
}

However, in your case it might be better to do something like this:

if(sList.Contains("ok"))
{
    // at least one element is "ok"
}
else
{
   // no elements are "ok"
}

It's not a direct answer to your question but there is a much easier way to do what you want. If you are using .NET 3.5 or later, at least. It is called Enumerable.Contains

bool found = sList.Contains("ok");
var ind=0;
foreach(string s in sList){
    if(s.equals("ok")){
        return true;
    }
    ind++;
}
if (ind==sList.length){
    return false;
}
  • Pretty sure $ isn't valid C# syntax. – R0MANARMY Jun 28 '11 at 16:42
  • probably not, im a javascript/php guy. but there is enough code here to apply a working solution... i removed the $ and added var.. probably still not c+ – johnny craig Jun 28 '11 at 16:46
  • actually var is a perfectly valid C# keyword, so you're good – R0MANARMY Jun 28 '11 at 16:50

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