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I got this idea from XKCD's Hofstadter comic; what's the best way to create a conditional loop in (any) Lisp dialect that executes a function until it returns NIL at which time it collects the returned values into a list.

For those who haven't seen the joke, it's goes that Douglas Hofstadter's “eight-word” autobiography consists of only six words: “I'm So Meta, Even This Acronym” containing continuation of the joke: (some odd meta-paraprosdokian?) “Is Meta” — the joke being that the autobiography is actually “I'm So Meta, Even This Acronym Is Meta”. But why not go deeper?

Assume the acronymizing function META that creates an acronym from a string and splits it into words, returns NIL if the string contains but one word:

(meta "I'm So Meta, Even This Acronym") ⇒ "Is Meta"
(meta (meta "I'm So Meta, Even This Acronym")) ⇒ "Im"
(meta (meta (meta "I'm So Meta, Even This Acronym"))) ⇒ NIL

(meta "GNU is Not UNIX") ⇒ "GNU"
(meta (meta "GNU is Not UNIX")) ⇒ NIL

Now I'm looking for how to implement a function so that:

(so-function #'meta "I'm So Meta, Even This Acronym") 
⇒ ("I'm So Meta, Even This Acronym" "Is Meta" "Im")
(so-function #'meta "GNU is Not Unix")
⇒ ("GNU is Not Unix" "GNU")

What's the best way of doing this?

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  • 1
    Jordan's answer "cheats" by being wired for only specific cases. For a general purpose <code>(meta)</code>, you would have to decide where word boundaries are. You could use a dictionary file.
    – compman
    Jun 29, 2011 at 3:29
  • @compman, his question specifically said to assume the existence of meta so I wouldn't call it "cheating". Still, you have a point. I'm not quite sure how to decide where the word boundaries are though, even given a dictionary. One particular problem would be how to decide you were looking at one word and should terminate. EDIT: One way might be to say "if this word is in my dictionary or if I cannot split this word into any number of subwords such that they are all in my dictionary, terminate". Jun 29, 2011 at 4:30

2 Answers 2

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This is easy. I don't want to write a solution, so instead I will -- but it'll be the crappy elisp version, which might lead to unexpected enlightenment if you'll follow through:

(defun so-function (f str)
  (let (x '())
    (while str (setq x (cons str x)) (setq str (funcall f str)))
    (reverse x)))

To try this out you'll need that meta, but I don't know how you'd decide where to put the spaces, so instead I'll fake it:

(defun meta (x)
  (cadr (assoc x '(("I'm So Meta, Even This Acronym" "Is Meta")
                   ("Is Meta" "Im")
                   ("GNU is Not UNIX" "GNU")))))

This makes the code that you want work. As for the enlightenment -- try to write it so instead of what you want, so-function will be a higher order function -- one that will work like this:

(funcall (so-function #'meta) "GNU is Not UNIX")

or, in Scheme:

((so-function meta) "GNU is Not UNIX")

The big hint here is that you can't do it in plain elisp (at least not without tricks from the cl library). To get full credit, avoid the mutations -- this will lead to the natural way you'd write it in Scheme, and might even look more readable than the setq version.

3
  • Shouldn't your Emacs Lisp version function call be (funcall #'so-function #'meta "GNUS is Not UNIX") which returns ("GNU is Not UNIX" "GNU")? (and similarly (funcall #'so-function #'meta "I'm So Meta, Even This Acronym")("I'm So Meta, Even This Acronym" "Is Meta" "Im")) Jun 28, 2011 at 19:10
  • Or just (so-function #'meta autobiography) like in Jordan Wade's answer Jun 28, 2011 at 19:12
  • No -- see the beginning of that part, where I said "try ti write it so ..." -- that's the exercise I gave out! Jun 28, 2011 at 21:04
1

Threw this together and it seems to work:

(defun collect-until-null (function initial-value)
  "Collects INITIAL-VALUE and the results of repeatedly applying FUNCTION to
   INITIAL-VALUE into a list.  When the result is NIL, iteration stops."
  (if initial-value
      (cons initial-value
            (collect-until-null function (funcall function initial-value)))))

Using a slightly modified version of the meta Eli Barzilay posted,

(defun meta (x)
  (cadr (assoc x
               '(("I'm So Meta, Even This Acronym" "Is Meta")
                 ("Is Meta" "Im")
                 ("GNU is Not UNIX" "GNU"))
               :test #'equal))) ;strings with the same characters aren't EQL

I get the result you were looking for.

CL-USER> (collect-until-null #'meta "I'm So Meta, Even This Acronym")
("I'm So Meta, Even This Acronym" "Is Meta" "Im")

CL-USER> (collect-until-null #'meta "GNU is Not UNIX")
("GNU is Not UNIX" "GNU")

Edit: @Rainer Joswig pointed out that collect-until-null will exhaust the stack if given a sufficiently large sequence. Below is Rainer's iterative version without this problem.

(defun collect-until-null-iter (function initial-value)
  "Collects INITIAL-VALUE and the results of repeatedly applying FUNCTION to
   INITIAL-VALUE into a list.  When the result is NIL, iteration stops."
  (loop for result = initial-value then (funcall function result)
        while result collect result))
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  • @Rainer Joswig, could you be more specific? I re-ran it in a fresh SBCL instance and had no problems. Jun 29, 2011 at 1:29
  • @Rainer, that isn't helping me figure out what's wrong. Could you please post the exact code you're using that's causing an overflow? (Or link if it's too long for a comment?) Jun 29, 2011 at 6:24
  • (collect-until-null (let ((n 20000)) (lambda (o) (unless (zerop n) (decf n)))) t) You may need to change N for your Lisp implementation. The one I tested it with has a stack overflow for n = 2300. Jun 29, 2011 at 6:58
  • @Rainer, I get it now and edited the answer with (what I think is) a tail-recursive version. Could you check it out and tell me if (1) your Lisp exhausts the stack with the new version and (2) if I'm doing anything non-idiomatic? I'm self-taught so it wouldn't surprise me if I did something that would make an more experienced person go "WTF?". Jun 29, 2011 at 19:02
  • 1
    This does the same as your code, without the need for the slightly non-standard TCO support: (loop for result = obj then (funcall func result) while result collect result) . Note also that there is the same problem as with your versions: the initial value is collected - without the function being applied to it, which is not what is documented. Jun 29, 2011 at 23:39

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