16

I am using a simple text field alert dialog with a positive and a cancel button. I want to validate my alert dialog and prevent the done button from closing the AlertDialog if the input is invalid.

Is there any way short of creating a custom dialog to prevent the PositiveButton onClick() handler from closing the dialog if the validation fails?

class CreateNewCategoryAlertDialog {
    final EditText editText;
    final AlertDialog alertDialog;

    class PositiveButtonClickListener implements OnClickListener {
        @Override
        public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
            String name = editText.getText().toString();
            if(name.equals("")) {
                editText.requestFocus();
                editText.setError("Please enter a name");
                // Some code to stop AlertDialog from closing goes here...
            } else {
                doSomethingUsefulWithName();
            }
        }
    }

    AlertDialog buildAlertDialog(Context context) {
        return new AlertDialog.Builder(context)
        .setTitle(context.getString(R.string.enter_name))
        .setMessage(context.getString(R.string.enter_name_msg))
        .setView(editText)
        .setPositiveButton(context.getString(R.string.done), new PositiveButtonClickListener())
        .setNegativeButton(context.getString(R.string.cancel), null).create();
    }
}
  • Sorry, I just noticed this is a duplicate of this (unaccepted) question. I'd close it as a duplicate, but I'm looking for a better answer. If the answer is "no," so be it. – Jeff Axelrod Jun 28 '11 at 19:04
  • 1
    Creating your own custom dialog seems to be the way to go based on previous questions. It seems like that will be the simplest solution, and it's what I've had to do in the past. – theisenp Jun 28 '11 at 19:29
  • I'm voting your question up. Let's see if the Discplined badge applies to questions :) – EboMike Jun 28 '11 at 23:34
9

Here's how I did it. Technically, it doesn't technically keep the dialog open, it closes it momentarily and re-opens it, but the net result is the same.

class MyAlertDialog implements OnDismissListener, OnCancelListener {
    final private EditText editText;
    final private AlertDialog alertDialog;
    final private EventManager eventManager;
    final private CategorySelector categorySelector;

    private Boolean canceled;

    MyAlertDialog(Context context) {
        editText = new EditText(context);
        alertDialog = buildAlertDialog(context);
        alertDialog.setOnDismissListener(this);
        alertDialog.setOnCancelListener(this);
        show();
    }

    private AlertDialog buildAlertDialog(Context context) {
        return new AlertDialog.Builder(context)
        .setTitle(context.getString(R.string.enter_name))
        .setMessage(context.getString(R.string.enter_name))
        .setView(editText)
        .setNeutralButton(context.getString(R.string.save_text), null)
        .setNegativeButton(context.getString(R.string.cancel_text), null)
            .create();
    }

    public void show() {
        canceled = false;
        alertDialog.show();
    }

    @Override public void onDismiss(DialogInterface dialog) {
        if(!canceled) {
            final String name = editText.getText().toString();
            if(name.equals("")) {
                editText.setError("Please enter a non-empty name");
                show();
            } else {
                doWhateverYouWantHere(name);
            }
        }
    }

    @Override public void onCancel(DialogInterface dialog) {
        canceled = true;
    }
}

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