Please see below pseudo code

//Single or multiple Producers produce using below method
    void Produce(object itemToQueue)
    {
        concurrentQueue.enqueue(itemToQueue);
        consumerSignal.set;
    }

    //somewhere else we have started a consumer like this
    //we have only one consumer
    void StartConsumer()
    {
        while (!concurrentQueue.IsEmpty())
        {
            if (concurrentQueue.TrydeQueue(out item))
            {
                //long running processing of item
            }
        }
        consumerSignal.WaitOne();
    }

How do I port this pattern I have used since time immemorial to use taskfactory created tasks and the new signalling features of net 4. In other words if someone were to write this pattern using net 4 how would it look like ? Pseudo code is fine. Iam already using .net 4 concurrentQueue as you can see. How do I use a task and possibly use some newer signalling mechanism if possible. thanks

Solution to my problem below thanks to Jon/Dan. Sweet. No manual signalling or while(true) or while(itemstoProcess) type loops like the old days

//Single or multiple Producers produce using below method
 void Produce(object itemToQueue)
 {
     blockingCollection.add(item);
 }

 //somewhere else we have started a consumer like this
 //this supports multiple consumers !
 task(StartConsuming()).Start; 

 void StartConsuming()
 {
     foreach (object item in blockingCollection.GetConsumingEnumerable())
     {
                //long running processing of item
     }
 }

cancellations are handled using cancel tokens
  • A really good (because it is step by step) explanation and example may be found here. – MajesticRa Jan 3 '12 at 13:53
  • Hi Gullu, please take a look at this code. It is a simple working example on how to use a BlockingCollection<T> for Producer-Consumer patterns. – sɐunıɔןɐqɐp Nov 8 '17 at 13:26
up vote 23 down vote accepted

You would use BlockingCollection<T>. There's an example in the documentation.

That class is specifically designed to make this trivial.

  • thx. But Iam already using a concurrentQ – Gullu Jun 28 '11 at 19:42
  • @user666490: That's fine - you wrap that in a BlockingCollection<T>. If you insist on doing things directly, you'll end up basically repeating a bunch of code in BlockingCollection<T> - why reinvent the wheel? – Jon Skeet Jun 28 '11 at 19:43
  • 4
    @user666490: Jon has given you the canonical .Net 4 solution to the producer consumer problem. From MSDN: "Provides blocking and bounding capabilities for thread-safe collections that implement IProducerConsumerCollection<T>." – user7116 Jun 28 '11 at 19:44
  • Jon, if you scroll to the bottom of the page on the msdn page you refer to above, you will see below code. This is so lame compared to the old fashioned signalling I have shown in my post above. Don't you agree ? // Consume bc while (true) Console.WriteLine(bc.Take()); } catch (InvalidOperationException) { // IOE means that Take() was called on a completed collection Console.WriteLine("That's All!"); } – Gullu Jun 28 '11 at 19:54
  • 1
    Blocking collection provides no signalling to the consumer unless the consumer is going to poll on blockingcollection.IsCompleted/IsAddingCompleted. In the classic pattern I have posted a producer adds to queue, signals the consumer and is done. With a blocking coll we can mark the coll as completedadding which then puts it in a state where more items cannot be added until the consumer deques all items. – Gullu Jun 28 '11 at 20:07

Your second block of code looks better. But, starting a Task and then immediately waiting on it is pointless. Just call Take and then process the item that is returned directly on the consuming thread. That is how the producer-consumer pattern is meant to be done. If you think the processing of work items is intensive enough to warrant more consumers then by all means start more consumers. BlockingCollection is safe multiple producers and multiple consumers.

public class YourCode
{
  private BlockingCollection<object> queue = new BlockingCollection<object>();

  public YourCode()
  {
    var thread = new Thread(StartConsuming);
    thread.IsBackground = true;
    thread.Start();
  }

  public void Produce(object item)
  {
    queue.Add(item);
  }

  private void StartConsuming()
  {
    while (true)
    {
      object item = queue.Take();
      // Add your code to process the item here.
      // Do not start another task or thread. 
    }
  }
}
  • good point. made corrections. thx – Gullu Jun 29 '11 at 13:08
  • why shouldn't we start another task or thread in StartConsuming? – Lokeshwer Aug 11 '12 at 15:00
  • @Lokeshwer: That would be fine by itself. What is not fine is starting another task and then waiting on it. That would be pointless. – Brian Gideon Aug 12 '12 at 0:27
  • Thanks for clarification – Lokeshwer Aug 12 '12 at 6:36
  • Excellent example; may I suggest adding the use of a cancellationtoken for completeness – joelc Jul 19 '16 at 1:12

I've used a pattern before that creates a sort of 'on-demand' queue consumer (based on consuming from a ConcurrentQueue):

        private void FireAndForget(Action fire)
        {
            _firedEvents.Enqueue(fire);
            lock (_taskLock)
            {
                if (_launcherTask == null)
                {
                    _launcherTask = new Task(LaunchEvents);
                    _launcherTask.ContinueWith(EventsComplete);
                    _launcherTask.Start();
                }
            }
        }

        private void LaunchEvents()
        {
            Action nextEvent;

            while (_firedEvents.TryDequeue(out nextEvent))
            {
                if (_synchronized)
                {
                    var syncEvent = nextEvent;
                    _mediator._syncContext.Send(state => syncEvent(), null);
                }
                else
                {
                    nextEvent();                        
                }

                lock (_taskLock)
                {
                    if (_firedEvents.Count == 0)
                    {
                        _launcherTask = null;
                        break;
                    }
                }
            }
        }

        private void EventsComplete(Task task)
        {
            if (task.IsFaulted && task.Exception != null)
            {
                 // Do something with task Exception here
            }
        }
  • thx. But Iam hoping net 4 new tpl pfx should make the classic pattern I have posted more easier to maintain/understand. Your approach is an overkill for me. – Gullu Jun 28 '11 at 19:48
  • 1
    If your primary goal is ease of use, Jon's answer is best; the BlockingCollection is designed specifically for this very common pattern (with a simple blocking call to Take and built-in support for the new Cancellation system.) – Dan Bryant Jun 28 '11 at 20:23

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