19

Is there some c++ proposal for Integer literal for fixed width integer types like this?

// i's type is unsigned int
auto i = 10u;
// j's type is uint32_t
auto j = 10u32;
24

Yes: P1280R0 Integer Width Literals (published 2018-10-05).

It proposes the following literals:

namespace std::inline literals::inline integer_literals {
  constexpr uint64_t operator ""u64 (unsigned long long arg);
  constexpr uint32_t operator ""u32 (unsigned long long arg);
  constexpr uint16_t operator ""u16 (unsigned long long arg);
  constexpr uint8_t operator ""u8 (unsigned long long arg);

  constexpr int64_t operator ""i64 (unsigned long long arg);
  constexpr int32_t operator ""i32 (unsigned long long arg);
  constexpr int16_t operator ""i16 (unsigned long long arg);
  constexpr int8_t operator ""i8 (unsigned long long arg);
}

And its update P1280R1 that "Modifies return types to actually be [u]int_leastXX_t and friends. This is to make sure that we are actually replacing the [U]INTxx_C macros, as these return a [u]int_leastXX_t":

namespace std::inline literals::inline integer_literals {
  constexpr uint_least64_t operator ""u64 (unsigned long long arg);
  constexpr uint_least32_t operator ""u32 (unsigned long long arg);
  constexpr uint_least16_t operator ""u16 (unsigned long long arg);
  constexpr uint_least8_t operator ""u8 (unsigned long long arg);

  constexpr int_least64_t operator ""i64 (unsigned long long arg);
  constexpr int_least32_t operator ""i32 (unsigned long long arg);
  constexpr int_least16_t operator ""i16 (unsigned long long arg);
  constexpr int_least8_t operator ""i8 (unsigned long long arg);
}

There is a 2019-06-12 update P1280R2 that makes the literals consteval instead of constexpr.

  • fwiw, I think that update made it worse. If I write auto x = 5u32; I want a 32bit integer and not "maybe something else that will fail on other platform" – RiaD Dec 3 '20 at 15:08
  • 3
    @RiaD -- it's uint32_t that will fail on some other platform. uint_least32_t is always available; uint32_t won't exist on (admittedly unusual) platforms that don't have a native 32-bit integer type. That's an inherent ambiguity with fixed-size integer types: you might want an exact size, or you might want something large enough to hold some number of bits. – Pete Becker Dec 3 '20 at 15:59
  • 3
    @PeteBecker 1) "platform doesn't support uint32, so I won't compile 5u32" is straightforward compiler error 2) "in some random place where uint_least32_t is used, some overloading is now ambiguous" (suppose that uint32_least_t=unsigned long long and the same example will be broken as in P1280) is less straight forward. I of course agree that you might want uint32_least_t, but why not use 5u_least32 ? – RiaD Dec 3 '20 at 16:18
  • 1
    The fixed-width types come with a bunch of ambiguity anyway thanks to the interaction with the integer promotions. Does adding two int32_ts result in an int32_t? Not if you're on a system where int is 64-bit! – user9723177 Dec 3 '20 at 18:41
  • 6
    And does multiplying two large uint16_ts and storing the result in a uint16_t variable result in wraparound or undefined behavior? Integer math in C/C++ is a horrible mess. – plugwash Dec 3 '20 at 19:19

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