27

Please consider the following class:

class Eq {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    System.out.println("" == ".".substring(1));
  }
}

The example is supposed to show that multiple copies of the empty string may exist in memory. I still have an old OpenJDK 11 where the program outputs false as expected. Under OpenJDK 15, the program outputs true. The generated bytecode for the class files looks similar (even though they differ in register values):

Java 11:

public static void main(java.lang.String[]);
  Code:
     0: getstatic     #7                  // Field java/lang/System.out:Ljava/io/PrintStream;
     3: ldc           #13                 // String
     5: ldc           #15                 // String .
     7: iconst_1
     8: invokevirtual #17                 // Method java/lang/String.substring:(I)Ljava/lang/String;
    11: if_acmpne     18
    14: iconst_1
    15: goto          19
    18: iconst_0
    19: invokevirtual #23                 // Method java/io/PrintStream.println:(Z)V
    22: return

Java 15:

public static void main(java.lang.String[]);
  Code:
     0: getstatic     #2                  // Field java/lang/System.out:Ljava/io/PrintStream;
     3: ldc           #3                  // String
     5: ldc           #4                  // String .
     7: iconst_1
     8: invokevirtual #5                  // Method java/lang/String.substring:(I)Ljava/lang/String;
    11: if_acmpne     18
    14: iconst_1
    15: goto          19
    18: iconst_0
    19: invokevirtual #6                  // Method java/io/PrintStream.println:(Z)V
    22: return

I tried to exclude static compiler optimizations by reading "." from stdin but this does not change the outcome. I have tried to disable the JIT via -Djava.compiler=NONE and played around with adjusting the string table size via -XX:StringTableSize=100000. I now have the following questions:

  • Can someone reproduce the issue (i.e. did I do it correctly? I can provide the class files if that helps)
  • How do I find out the exact reason for the different behaviour?
  • What (in your opinion) is the source for the different behaviour?

I think just strategies to approach how to find the reason for the behaviour that don't answer the question might also be interesting.

  • 9
    The source of the different behaviour may be that someone optimized the String class, I suppose. Ah, there it is – a documented feature. – MC Emperor Dec 3 '20 at 21:20
  • 7
    Just to add: Its perfectly allowed for implementations to change this behavior. You should not rely on this comparison, ever. – Polygnome Dec 4 '20 at 10:31
  • 4
    @Polygnome's comment answers your question about "how to deal with it": Don't. ;-) (Use equals, but you know that.) – Peter - Reinstate Monica Dec 4 '20 at 11:23
  • 2
    I can only emphazie this point for other readers: unless there is a very compelling reason not to do it, strings should be compared by equals. The behaviour I described only appears in a particular version in a particular implementation of the Java library. It is a severe programming error to rely on such implementation defined behaviour. I edited my question that it becomes clear I'm not looking how to make this acceptable. – lambda.xy.x Dec 4 '20 at 12:33
33

This is mentioned in the JDK 15 Release Notes.

It was changed as requested by JDK-8240094:

JDK-8240094 : Optimize empty substring handling

String.substring return "" in some cases, but could be improved to do so in all cases when the substring length is zero.

Related:

JDK-8240225 : Optimize empty substring handling

Optimize String.substring and related operations like stripLeading, stripTrailing to avoid redundantly creating a new empty String.

Sub Task:

JDK-8251556 : Release Note: Optimized Empty Substring Handling

The implementation of String.substring and related methods stripLeading and stripTrailing have changed in this release to avoid redundantly creating a new empty String. This may impact code that depends on unspecified behaviour and the identity of empty sub-strings.

  • 2
    Just curious: .NET has String.Empty since the earliest version, Apache Commons suggest a similar final reference StringUtils.EMPTY. Those JDK items and issues would probably never exist if an empty string constant would exist from the very beginning. Was there any idea of introducing the "default" empty string constant to Java? – fluffy Dec 3 '20 at 21:37
  • 14
    @fluffy "" is the default empty string constant, no need to create a constant field for it, since string literals are always interned for you. – Andreas Dec 3 '20 at 21:39
  • 8
    @fluffy The string constant pool is synthesized by the JVM at runtime and merges all constant strings. – chrylis -cautiouslyoptimistic- Dec 3 '20 at 21:55
  • 4
    @fluffy it doesn’t matter whether you use "" or SomeClass.CONSTANT. The important point is that the substring method needs to perform an explicit test whether the result string has length zero and use one of those constants instead of calling new String(…) in that case. Without that test, declaring a constant for empty strings doesn’t help. – Holger Dec 4 '20 at 9:49
  • 5
    @fluffy having public constructors in the string class is a historical design mistake on its own (including String(), encouraging developers to create redundant strings even when known to be empty). However, for the string class itself, that makes little difference as even private constructors are accessible. Consistently using factory methods that may perform this check would help, but there is a different point of view. Is this optimization really an improvement? We now have an additional conditional in every substring operation, serving the rare corner case of an empty result… – Holger Dec 4 '20 at 11:16

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