311

How would you use a switch case when you need to test for a or b in the same case?

switch (pageid) {
  case "listing-page":
  case "home-page":
    alert("hello");
    break;
  case "details-page":
    alert("goodbye");
    break;
}
3

7 Answers 7

742

You can use fall-through:

switch (pageid)
{
    case "listing-page":
    case "home-page":
        alert("hello");
        break;
    case "details-page":
        alert("goodbye");
        break;
}
8
  • 80
    It's called fall-through. Jun 28, 2011 at 22:00
  • 3
    I found this out before I posted the question, but thought it would be useful for the community since it's not well documented anywhere... thank you @SLaks for you're answer too.
    – Andres
    Jun 29, 2011 at 14:40
  • Hi @kei I know this isn't the proper place for this, but you answered my last question correctly stackoverflow.com/questions/21049005/… would you like to repost your answer?
    – Leon Gaban
    Jan 10, 2014 at 16:28
  • 1
    I might as well clarify the point: Once a case has evaluated to true, that's it. No more cases are checked, just all the statements executed until the end: i.e. a "break;" instruction or if the switch is terminated. Dec 22, 2014 at 9:19
  • 1
    other examples here in MDN docs Jun 24, 2015 at 9:46
140

Since the other answers explained how to do it without actually explaining why it works:

When the switch executes, it finds the first matching case statement and then executes each line of code after the switch until it hits either a break statement or the end of the switch (or a return statement to leave the entire containing function). When you deliberately omit the break so that code under the next case gets executed too that's called a fall-through. So for the OP's requirement:

switch (pageid) {
   case "listing-page":
   case "home-page":
      alert("hello");
      break;

   case "details-page":
      alert("goodbye");
      break;
} 

Forgetting to include break statements is a fairly common coding mistake and is the first thing you should look for if your switch isn't working the way you expected. For that reason some people like to put a comment in to say "fall through" to make it clear when break statements have been omitted on purpose. I do that in the following example since it is a bit more complicated and shows how some cases can include code to execute before they fall-through:

switch (someVar) {
   case 1:
      someFunction();
      alert("It was 1");
      // fall through
   case 2:
      alert("The 2 case");
      // fall through
   case 3:
      // fall through
   case 4:
      // fall through
   case 5:
      alert("The 5 case");
      // fall through
   case 6:
      alert("The 6 case");
      break;

   case 7:
      alert("Something else");
      break;

   case 8:
      // fall through
   default:
      alert("The end");
      break;
}

You can also (optionally) include a default case, which will be executed if none of the other cases match - if you don't include a default and no cases match then nothing happens. You can (optionally) fall through to the default case.

So in my second example if someVar is 1 it would call someFunction() and then you would see four alerts as it falls through multiple cases some of which have alerts under them. Is someVar is 3, 4 or 5 you'd see two alerts. If someVar is 7 you'd see "Something else" and if it is 8 or any other value you'd see "The end".

2
  • 4
    The //fall through comment make my phpstorm stop warning me about the fall-through switch statement, thanks :)
    – Getz
    Jul 17, 2013 at 8:29
  • You can use return instead of break if the switch is in a function that you call to return some object: switch (action.type) { case ADD: { return newState; } case DELETE: { return newState; } default: { return state; } }
    – Dominika
    Feb 19, 2019 at 21:20
16

You need to make two case labels.

Control will fall through from the first label to the second, so they'll both execute the same code.

15

You have to switch it!

switch (true) {
    case ( (pageid === "listing-page") || (pageid === ("home-page") ):
        alert("hello");
        break;
    case (pageid === "details-page"):
        alert("goodbye");
        break;
}
2
  • 1
    This method is very innovative :-) I like it for that. But, as it uses more characters than the classic "fall-through", it becomes lesser interesting :) Sep 11, 2018 at 5:20
  • 1
    @AlexLaforge the most weird and ironical that in another stackouverflow question such answer was totally downvoted. But nevertheless i support this answer and agree, that's good solution for flexible conditions. Jun 16, 2019 at 8:15
3

Forget switch and break, lets play with if. And instead of asserting

if(pageid === "listing-page" || pageid === "home-page")

lets create several arrays with cases and check it with Array.prototype.includes()

var caseA = ["listing-page", "home-page"];
var caseB = ["details-page", "case04", "case05"];

if(caseA.includes(pageid)) {
    alert("hello");
}
else if (caseB.includes(pageid)) {
    alert("goodbye");
}
else {
    alert("there is no else case");
}
1
  • I think this is not the best solution, specially for perfomance. The .includes is way slower than a switch case, and thus, using if/else. It is best by using the switch case with fall-through. Sep 2, 2020 at 11:02
0

Cleaner way to do that 👌

if (["listing-page", "home-page"].indexOf(pageid) > -1)
    alert("hello");

else if (["exit-page", "logout-page"].indexOf(pageid) > -1)
    alert("Good bye");

You can do that for multiple values with the same result

-8

Use commas to separate case

switch (pageid)
{
    case "listing-page","home-page":
        alert("hello");
        break;
    case "details-page":
        alert("goodbye");
        break;
}
1
  • 1
    The reason why this doesn't work is because case "listing-page","home-page": is equivalent to case "home-page": (because "listing-page","home-page" is just an expression evaluating to "home-page"). Aug 10, 2021 at 14:37

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.