1

tl,dr: My function seems to work, but then I lapply it and it doesn't. Is it the function or the lapplying?

The data

I have a datatable that contains text which is already tokenised into a character vector:

   id                   text
1:  1    c("sadness", "joy")
2:  2   c("anger", "scream")
3:  3 c("relief", "sadness")

I want to annotate my tokenised texts with emotional values with a dictionary that has words and associated emotional values:

     words emotion1 emotion2
1: sadness        1        5
2:   anger        2        6
3:  relief        3        7

The ultimate goal

I am expecting my search_function to output something similar to this:

my_emotion_function(c("relief", "sadness"), lexicon_emotions)
   emotion1 emotion2
1:        2        6
my_emotion_function(c("relief", "meh"), lexicon_emotions)
   emotion1 emotion2
1:        3        7
my_emotion_function(c("meh", "ugh"), lexicon_emotions)
   emotion1 emotion2
1:       NA       NA

Applying this to the tokens, I would add new columns and fill them with the results.

  id               text     emotion1 emotion2
1:  1  c("sadness", "joy")         1        5
2:  2  c("anger", "scream")        2        6
3:  3  c("relief", "sadness")      2        6

The function that half-works

The function takes a character vector, subsets the (keyed) emotional dictionary for matching words and calculates the average score for each emotional dimension.

my_emotion_function <- function(characters, lexicon){
  return(lexicon[.(characters), lapply(.SD, mean, na.rm = TRUE), .SDcols = 2:3])
}

What I don't understand

What I am baffled by and can't understand is why this function seems to work well when tested on one character vector (the example above, testing it only on one vector, works well), but when I want to lapply it to a data.table, it doens't work.
I am not sure whether the function is wrong in one aspect or my laplying of it to the data.table. I can't figure out why the single instance works, but not repeatedly on a data.table

If I execute the above code, with an equal number of tokens in each "text" row, then I will just get N.A for every cell, no matter the words.

   id                   text emotion1 emotion2
1:  1    c("sadness", "joy")      NaN      NaN
2:  2   c("anger", "scream")      NaN      NaN
3:  3 c("relief", "sadness")      NaN      NaN

If you test it out with an unequal number of tokens (say the first row), then every row contains the value for the first row.

   id                   text emotion1 emotion2
1:  1                sadness        1        5
2:  2   c("anger", "scream")        1        5
3:  3 c("relief", "sadness")        1        5

I can't find a reason as to why I either get only the same result or NA's everywhere.

Complete code for reproduction

library(data.table)
table_of_tokens <- data.table("id" = 1:3,
                              "text" = list(c("sadness", "joy"),
                                            c("anger", "scream"),
                                            c("relief", "sadness")))
table_of_tokens[, "text" := as.character(text)]
#convert to character vector to use key-subsetting in data.table

lexicon_emotions <-
  data.table(
    "words" = c("sadness", "anger", "relief"),
    "emotion1" = 1:3,
    "emotion2" = 5:7
  )
setkey(lexicon_emotions, words)

my_emotion_function <- function(characters, lexicon) {
  return(lexicon[.(characters), 
                 lapply(.SD, mean, na.rm = TRUE), .SDcols = 2:3])
}
table_of_tokens[, c("emotion1", "emotion2") := 
                  my_emotion_function(text, lexicon_emotions)]

Credit: this is a basically a re-write of the syuzhet R-package, which relies on data.frames and is therefore not flexible or efficient enough in my situation for a large dataset.

2
  • 1
    I think part of the problem you're having is that you've converted table_of_tokens$text from a list of character vectors into a vector of character strings. table_of_tokens[2,2][[1]] for example evaluates to "c(\"anger\", \"scream\")". Can you explain why you needed to do this? Commented Dec 5, 2020 at 16:36
  • @IanCampbell As far as I understand, subsetting a data.table with a key only works with a vector, not a list? lexicon_emotions[.(c("sadness", "grief"))] works, but lexicon_emotions[.(list("grief", "anger"))] tells me that i.V1 is type list which is not supported by data.table join.
    – Marvin
    Commented Dec 6, 2020 at 13:01

2 Answers 2

2

Edit: this should get you want you want.

library(data.table)
table_of_tokens <- data.table(
    "id" = 1:3,
    "text" = list(
        c("sadness"), 
        c("anger", "scream"),
        c("relief", "grief"),
        c("relief", "grief", "sadness")
    )
)

lexicon_emotions <- data.table("words" = c("sadness", "anger", "relief"), 
                                                             "emotion1" = 1:3,
                                                             "emotion2" = 5:7,
                                                             key = "words")


emotions <- names(lexicon_emotions)[-1]
table_of_tokens[,
    (emotions) := {
        res <- lapply(text, function(x) {
            lexicon_emotions[words %chin% x,
                             lapply(.SD, mean, na.rm = TRUE),
                             .SDcols = emotions]
        })
        rbindlist(res)
    }
]

print(table_of_tokens)
> print(table_of_tokens)
   id                 text emotion1 emotion2
1:  1              sadness        1        5
2:  2         anger,scream        2        6
3:  3         relief,grief        3        7
4:  1 relief,grief,sadness        2        6
3
  • Thank you for your answer! I feel like I would lose a bit of information without the column names but I can definitely live with that. However, in your example, with "relief", "grief", "sadness" in the third row, the end result should actually be the average score, in this case 2, 6; not 3, 7, which ignores the sadness occuring later in the third row. For that, emo1 <- vapply(res, [, numeric(1), 1) would need to pick out every even element in the lists and then calculate the mean; similiarly for emo2 every odd-element.
    – Marvin
    Commented Dec 6, 2020 at 14:33
  • Oh i get what are saying, gimme a second Commented Dec 6, 2020 at 15:02
  • Thank you! Feels extremely validated, with both Cole and you coming to essentially the same conclusion. I love the emotions<- names() line, that is more elegant than my initial approach and goes straight into my code. Guess I need to think a bit more about how I attach new columns to a data.table...
    – Marvin
    Commented Dec 9, 2020 at 13:54
0

One of the most important aspects of code writing is debugging. Let's use a simple print() call to figure out what is happening during the function call:

my_emotion_function <- function(characters, lexicon) {
  print(characters) ## for debugging
  return(lexicon[.(characters), 
                 lapply(.SD, mean, na.rm = TRUE), .SDcols = 2:3])
}

table_of_tokens[, c("emotion1", "emotion2") := 
                  my_emotion_function(text, lexicon_emotions)]

## [1] "c(\"sadness\", \"joy\")"    "c(\"anger\", \"scream\")"   "c(\"relief\", \"sadness\")"

What that means is that we are are actually performing:

lexicon["c(\"sadness\", \"joy\")" ...]

## what we actually want for each token

lexicon[c("sadness", "joy"), lapply(.SD, mean, na.rm = TRUE), .SDcols = 2:3])

To do so, we do not want to convert from a list to a character as suggested by @IanCampbell. The other item is that we want to loop through each element, which means lapply() can be our friend:

table_of_tokens[, c("emotion1", "emotion2") := 
                  rbindlist(lapply(text, my_emotion_function, lexicon_emotions))]
table_of_tokens

##    id           text emotion1 emotion2
## 1:  1    sadness,joy        1        5
## 2:  2   anger,scream        2        6
## 3:  3 relief,sadness        2        6

I am still uncertain what would happen if there were no matches.

7
  • Thank you for your answer! I am afraid that in my case, I want as many results as possible to match for more precise emotion detection, and my emotional dictionary is quite large.
    – Marvin
    Commented Dec 6, 2020 at 13:06
  • Could you edit your question to reproduce that criteria? In your example, it was a one to one match. It is ok if it is one to many, but your example should reflect that.
    – Cole
    Commented Dec 6, 2020 at 13:21
  • Ah, sorry, you meant that for every character I could have more than one match? No, every entry in the dictionary I look up must be unique, sorry, I misunderstood you there (sadness can only have pair of emotional values). What I meant is that ine one row of table_tokens, there might be multiple characters that match. In the edited example, in the last row, both relief and sadness match dictionary entries.
    – Marvin
    Commented Dec 7, 2020 at 14:14
  • Thanks for the edits. Can you include expected results?
    – Cole
    Commented Dec 8, 2020 at 3:05
  • Thank you for your engagement! I have added some examples for the individual function output and the whole data.table. Do you need more? Basically I believe my_emotion_function works, but not on a data.table. And I am not sure whether I am making a mistake in the function or when applying it to a data.table.
    – Marvin
    Commented Dec 8, 2020 at 14:23

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