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I am trying to create a lookup table using np.empty() but when I printed the array, I realized that velues in array were not zeros. When I searched for it, I found out that both np.zeros() and np.empty() assigns 0 to all values but do things different while allocating. I mean why not np.empty() returns an array full of zeros? And what is the deal with that allocating differences?

Here's my code:


import numpy as np

lookUpTable = np.empty((1,256), np.uint8)
print(lookUpTable[0,2])
print(lookUpTable)

gamma=0.4
for i in range(256):
    lookUpTable[0,i] = np.clip(pow(i / 255.0, gamma) * 255.0, 0, 255)
print(lookUpTable)

And here is the assignment they gave:

np.zeros()

[[0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
  0 0 0 0]]

np.empty()


[[ 92   0  63   0  63   0  92   0  67   0  58   0  92   0  85   0 115   0
  101   0 114   0 115   0  92   0 102   0  97   0 122   0 105   0 108   0
   92   0  65   0 112   0 112   0  68   0  97   0 116   0  97   0  92   0
   76   0 111   0  99   0  97   0 108   0  92   0  80   0 114   0 111   0
  103   0 114   0  97   0 109   0 115   0  92   0  80   0 121   0 116   0
  104   0 111   0 110   0  92   0  80   0 121   0 116   0 104   0 111   0
  110   0  51   0  56   0  45   0  51   0  50   0  92   0 108   0 105   0
  109   0 112   0 121   0  92   0 114   0  97   0 110   0 100   0 111   0
  109   0  92   0  95   0 103   0 101   0 110   0 101   0 114   0  97   0
  116   0 111   0 114   0  46   0  99   0 112   0  51   0  56   0  45   0
  119   0 105   0 110   0  51   0  50   0  46   0 112   0 121   0 100   0
   46   0  50   0  46   0  67   0 111   0 110   0 102   0 105   0 103   0
    0   0   0   0]]
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    No, the np.empty documentation explicitly states that it doesn't do that. Have you read the documentation? "empty, unlike zeros, does not set the array values to zero, and may therefore be marginally faster. On the other hand, it requires the user to manually set all the values in the array, and should be used with caution." Dec 6, 2020 at 17:22
  • np.empty does not fill it with zeros, it will contain data that was there at the moment when that part of memory was allocated. Dec 6, 2020 at 17:52

2 Answers 2

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From np.zeros documentation:

Return a new array of given shape and type, filled with zeros.

From np.empty documentation:

Return a new array of given shape and type, without initializing entries.

The documentation is extremely clear about this and contains the answer: numpy.empty() returns an uninitialized array of the chosen size. This means that the contents of the array will be totally undefined when you create it, and you'll need to make sure you initialize it correctly the first time you use it. Instead numpy.zeros() takes care of initializing the new array by filling it with zeros.

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    @34MFB34 if this answers your question, please accept the answer or upvote equivalents questions that you consider satisfactory. In this way future users will be able to quickly assess the quality of the answer in relation to your question
    – Wippo
    Dec 6, 2020 at 17:21
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np.zeros guarantees that you get an array filled with zeros. np.empty gives you an array with whatever happened to be in memory; there is no promise that it zeros out the array.

Only use the latter when you are planning on completely filling the array with your own values.

I don't know anything about numpy's internal implementation, but I suspect it uses np.empty or some equivalent when allocating an array to hold a result. It will be explicitly filling every element of the result array, so it doesn't need to waste time making sure that the array is zeroed.

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