32

For one of my projects, what I really wanted to do was this (simplifying it to the bare minimum);

struct Move
{
    int src;
    int dst;
};

struct MoveTree
{
    Move move;
    std::vector<MoveTree> variation;
};

I must admit that I assumed that it wouldn't be possible to do this directly, I thought a vector of MoveTree s within a MoveTree would be verboten. But I tried it anyway, and it works beautifully. I am using Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 Express.

Is this portable ? Is it good practise ? Do I have anything to worry about ?

Edit: I've asked a second question hoping to find a good way of doing this.

  • std::vector<MoveTree>& variation; MoveTree(): variation(*new std::vector<MoveTree>){}; ~MoveTree(){delete &variation;} seems to be portable – user396672 Jun 29 '11 at 8:33
  • @Scheff You do realize that this question was created and answered in 2011, right? – SteamyThePunk May 11 '19 at 3:59
  • @Scheff Maybe I read more malice than you intended. Following up later with factual updates to the state of the art after the fact is one thing, but ridiculing posts about their lack of future knowledge seems less honorable. – SteamyThePunk May 13 '19 at 0:42
  • @SteamyThePunk "would be verboten" looked to me like a wordplay (with an accidentally mixed in German word). I was not aware that "verboten" is a common English word. Just found out the opposite, as Oxford dict. lists it (with (Surprise.) denoting German origin). Just having learnt something else... (Please forget about it.) – Scheff May 13 '19 at 5:38
30

The C++ Standard (2003) clearly says that instantiating a standard container with an incomplete type, invokes undefined-behavior.

The spec says in §17.4.3.6/2,

In particular, the effects are undefined in the following cases:

__ [..]
— if an incomplete type (3.9) is used as a template argument when instantiating a template component.
__ [..]

| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    +1 one for actually giving a correct answer, citing the standard in doing so. – James Kanze Jun 29 '11 at 7:56
  • 3
    I am trying to find the exact quote that explains where is the vector instantiated in the above code. Any hints? – David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 29 '11 at 8:00
  • 2
    After going back and forth, I am quite convinced that the declaration that you quote is actually the point of instantiation of the template. Had it been in a member function (including the constructor, whether user defined or implicitly generated) then the code would have been correct, since a class is considered complete inside the definition of the methods (i.e. if the point of instantiation where MoveTree::MoveTree() : variation() {} then the code would be correct (§14.7.1 explains the rules for implicit instantiaitons for those curious enough to read on) – David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 29 '11 at 8:33
  • 1
    @Nawaz: No, I was unsure of where the point of instantiation is, and I just added a comment stating why it matters: if the template was considered instantiated (which it is not, the reference I provided §14.7.1 says otherwise) then the code would be correct, which it is not, I insist. That is: struct Test { std::vector<Test>* p; Test() : p ( new std::vector<Test>() ) {} ~Test() { delete p; } };, as an example is valid because the instantiation (in this different case) is not performed in the class definition, but in the constructor. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 29 '11 at 14:29
  • 10
    I think this needs to be updated . Please see this – P0W Jan 28 '17 at 19:16
5

MoveTree is an incomplete type inside its definition. The standard does not guarantee instantiation of STL templates with incomplete types.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    I think this needs to be updated . Please see this – P0W Jan 28 '17 at 19:17
5

Use a pointer to the type in the Vector, this will be portable.

struct Move
    {
        int src;
        int dst;
    };

struct MoveTree;

struct MoveTree
    {
        Move move;
        std::vector<MoveTree*> variation;
    };
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    If the only tool you have is a hammer then everything is a nail. – David Allan Finch Jun 29 '11 at 8:53
  • 2
    Alternatively, you can use shared_ptr<vector<MoveTree>> variation and only dynamically allocate the vector (which will contain the objects by value). This has the negative effect of changing the value semantics of the object, so you will need to provide copy constructor / assignment operator. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 29 '11 at 15:40
  • 1
    @David Allen Finch: "if the only tool..." I understand the idiom, but not what you are applying it to. The STL, the std::vector, or std:vector to non-pointers? – Merlyn Morgan-Graham Jul 1 '11 at 5:00
  • 1
    @Merlyn Morgan-Graham: No. When a standard container is instantiated the contained type must be complete. Now, if the vector is dynamically allocated, the point of instantiation moves from the declaration of the member (which in this case it is a shared_ptr) to a later time, when the vector is actually allocated. That allocation will happen during construction, and a type is always considered complete while processing the member functions. That is, in MoveTree::MoveTree() : variation( new std::vector<MoveTree>() ) {}, MoveTree is complete. Read the comments in @Nawaz's answer. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 1 '11 at 7:27
  • 2
    Note that there will be roughly the same number of dynamically allocated objects (i.e. shared_ptr), as each MoveTree either is held by a smart_ptr or holds a smart_ptr to a vector, I preferred the approach of holding the vector as it allows you to publish a reference to it, and user code does not need to be modified (can walk through a vector<MoveTree>, does not need to perform extra dereferences). – David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 1 '11 at 7:46
2

The MoveTree elements in std::vector are in an allocated (as in new []) array. Only the control information (the pointer to the array, the size, etc) are stored within the std::vector within MoveTree.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Maybe I'm wrong but stl implementation may choose to allocate the array anywhere, for example, may allocate short arrays in memory reserved inside vector object itself – user396672 Jun 29 '11 at 8:26
2

No, it's not portable. codepad.org does not compile it.

t.cpp:14:   instantiated from here
Line 215: error: '__gnu_cxx::_SGIAssignableConcept<_Tp>::__a' has incomplete type
compilation terminated due to -Wfatal-errors.
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    @Eamon 4.2.2 doesn't, at least not if you use the options for strict verification. (I think it's -D_GLIBCXX_CONCEPT_CHECKS which controls this.) It's undefined behavior. (It was intended that C++11 require a diagnostic, but that was part of the concepts package, which I don't think made it into the final version.) – James Kanze Jun 29 '11 at 7:55
  • Ok, if I turn that check on - it fails. That's still not a huge portability stumbling block. – Eamon Nerbonne Jun 29 '11 at 8:07
0

You should define copy constructors and assignment operators for both Move and MoveTree when using vector, otherwise it will use the compiler generated ones, which may cause problems.

| improve this answer | |
  • I can't see how the decision of whether or not to supply a user defined copy constructor and assignment operator should in any way be influenced by whether or not the objects are used in a vector. And as it is, I can't see why either of these classes would need either of those things. – Benjamin Lindley Jun 29 '11 at 7:59
  • @Benjamin, thanks for taking the time to comment. I accept the point about it having nothing to do with his question about incomplete the type. vector needs the copy constructor; in his case, the default one. he asked if there was anything to look out for, I thought it was worth pointing out. – Blazes Jun 29 '11 at 9:10
  • The code as it stands (i.e. a type that contains a vector of it's own type) is incorrect, regardless of whether you provide constructors, assignment operators or none of them.. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 29 '11 at 15:41

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.