26

Is there an easy way of finding the neighbours (that is, the eight elements around an element) of an element in a two-dimensional array? Short of just subtracting and adding to the index in different combinations, like this:

array[i-1][i]
array[i-1][i-1]
array[i][i-1]
array[i+1][i]

... And so on.

18 Answers 18

34
0

(pseudo-code)

row_limit = count(array);
if(row_limit > 0){
  column_limit = count(array[0]);
  for(x = max(0, i-1); x <= min(i+1, row_limit); x++){
    for(y = max(0, j-1); y <= min(j+1, column_limit); y++){
      if(x != i || y != j){
        print array[x][y];
      }
    }
  }
}

Of course, that takes almost as many lines as the original hard-coded solution, but with this one you can extend the "neighborhood" as much as you can (2-3 or more cells away)

| improve this answer | |
  • Add code to the if statement to check upper and lower bounds and it's perfect. – Joel Coehoorn Mar 16 '09 at 20:56
  • Not sure he'd want to do that; he's searching for all 8 neighbors, not just vertical || horizontal. Or did I miss something? – Seb Mar 16 '09 at 20:59
  • 2
    Joel is saying that if you do this at the edges, without some boundry checking, you'll get an index out of bounds exception as you look for something like array[-1][4]. – Beska Mar 16 '09 at 21:07
14
0

I think Ben is correct in his approach, though I might reorder it, to possibly improve locality.

array[i-1][j-1]
array[i-1][j]
array[i-1][j+1]

array[i][j-1]
array[i][j+1]

array[i+1][j-1]
array[i+1][j]
array[i+1][j+1]

One trick to avoid bounds checking issues, is to make the array dimensions 2 larger than needed. So, a little matrix like this

3 1 4
1 5 9
2 6 5

is actually implemented as

0 0 0 0 0
0 3 1 4 0
0 1 5 9 0
0 2 6 5 0
0 0 0 0 0 

then while summing, I can subscript from 1 to 3 in both dimensions, and the array references above are guaranteed to be valid, and have no effect on the final sum. I am assuming c, and zero based subscripts for the example

| improve this answer | |
  • Good idea for the bounds checking, came here to see if I could avoid it in any way and this solution will do nicely! – Akasha Aug 23 '19 at 0:44
5
0

an alternative to @SebaGR, if your language supports this:

var deltas = { {x=-1, y=-1}, {x=0, y=-1}, {x=1, y=-1},
               {x=-1, y=0},               {x=1, y=0},
               {x=-1, y=1},  {x=0, y=1},  {x=1, y=1} };
foreach (var delta in deltas)
{
    if (x+delta.x < 0 || x + delta.x >= array.GetLength(0) ||
        y+delta.y < 0 || y + delta.y >= array.GetLength(1))
        continue;

    Console.WriteLine("{0}", array[x + delta.x, y + delta.y]);
}

Slight advantage in readability, possible performance if you can statically allocate the deltas.

| improve this answer | |
  • Good proposal but bad style, so no upvote. Better avoid continue and use the positive condition. – starblue Mar 16 '09 at 21:53
5
0

Here is a working Javascript example from @seb original pseudo code:

function findingNeighbors(myArray, i, j) {
  var rowLimit = myArray.length-1;
  var columnLimit = myArray[0].length-1;

  for(var x = Math.max(0, i-1); x <= Math.min(i+1, rowLimit); x++) {
    for(var y = Math.max(0, j-1); y <= Math.min(j+1, columnLimit); y++) {
      if(x !== i || y !== j) {
        console.log(myArray[x][y]);
      }
    }
  }
}
| improve this answer | |
3
0

array[i][j] has neighbors

array[i-1][j]
array[i][j-1]
array[i-1][j-1]
array[i+1][j]
array[i][j+1]
array[i+1][j+1]
array[i+1][j-1]
array[i-1][j+1]

That's probably the fastest/easiest way is to just list all possible neighbors. Make sure to do index out of bound checking though.

Some languages might offer a shortcut way of doing this, but I don't know of any.

| improve this answer | |
3
0

This is an implementation of @Seb's answer in python3+ that is concise and uses generators for max performance:

def neighbours(pos, matrix):
    rows = len(matrix)
    cols = len(matrix[0]) if rows else 0
    for i in range(max(0, pos[0] - 1), min(rows, pos[0] + 2)):
        for j in range(max(0, pos[1] - 1), min(cols, pos[1] + 2)):
            if (i, j) != pos:
                yield matrix[i][j]
| improve this answer | |
2
0

Here is a convenient method in Python:

def neighbors(array,pos):
    n = []
     string = "array[pos.y+%s][pos.x+%s]"
    for i in range(-1,2):
        for j in range(-1,2):
            n.append(eval(string % (i,j)))
    return n

Assuming pos is some 2D Point object and array is a 2D array.

| improve this answer | |
  • I guess we should exclude i=j=0, and add bounds checking if needed. – Sridhar Thiagarajan Jan 22 '19 at 19:18
1
0

Since in a matrix around an element there are only 8 elements, you can use array to store different index values.For e.g.,

  int iarr[8] = {-1,-1,-1,0,0,+1,+1,+1};
  int jarr[8] = {-1,0,+1,-1,+1,-1,0,+1};
  for(int i = 0 ; i < 8 ; i++)
   {
    if(arr[x-iarr[i]][y-jarr[i]] == 1)
    {
     //statements
    }
   }  
  /* x and y are the position of elements from where you want to reach out its neighbour */

since both array contains just 8 values , then space might not be a problem.

| improve this answer | |
1
0

Grid (vector 2D or one dimension... not the problem here)
X & Y, coordinate of your element (or just pass your vector element by ref...)

int neighbour(const Grid & g, const size_t & x, const size_t & y) {
    for (int i = -1; i < 2; ++i)
        for (int j = -1; j < 2; ++j)
            if (x + i >= 0 && x + i < g.row && y + j >= 0 && y + j < g.col)
                //Do some stuff
    return 0;
}
| improve this answer | |
1
0

JS sample :

    function findingNeighbors(myArray, i, j){
        return myArray.reduce(function(a, b, c){
            if(Math.max(0, i-1) <= c && c <= Math.min(i+1, myArray.length-1)){
                a = a.concat(
                    b.reduce(function(d, e, f){
                    if(f == j && c == i)
                        return d;
                    if(Math.max(0, j-1) <= f && f <= Math.min(j+1, myArray.length-1))
                        d.push(e)
                    return d;
                    },[])
                );
            }
            return a;
        },[]);
    }
| improve this answer | |
0
0

A lot depends on what your data is. For example, if your 2D array is a logical matrix, you could convert rows to integers and use bitwise operations to find the ones you want.

For a more general-purpose solution I think you're stuck with indexing, like SebaGR's solution.

| improve this answer | |
0
0

Rows and Cols are total number of rows and cols

Define a CellIndex struct or class. Or you can just return the actual values instead of the indexes.

public List<CellIndex> GetNeighbors(int rowIndex, int colIndex)
{
var rowIndexes = (new int[] { rowIndex - 1, rowIndex, rowIndex + 1 }).Where(n => n >= 0 && n < Rows);

var colIndexes = (new int[] { colIndex - 1, colIndex, colIndex + 1 }).Where(n => n >= 0 && n < Cols);

return (from row in rowIndexes from col in colIndexes where row != rowIndex || col != colIndex select new CellIndex { Row = row, Col = col }).ToList();
}
| improve this answer | |
0
0
private ArrayList<Element> getNeighbors(Element p) {
    ArrayList<Element> n = new ArrayList<Element>();

    for (int dr = -1; dr <= +1; dr++) {
        for (int dc = -1; dc <= +1; dc++) {
            int r = p.row + dr;
            int c = p.col + dc;

            if ((r >= 0) && (r < ROWS) && (c >= 0) && (c < COLS)) {
                // skip p
                if ((dr != 0) || (dc != 0))
                    n.add(new Element(r, c));
            }               
        }
    }

    return n;
}
| improve this answer | |
0
0

although nested for loops in list comprehensions is a bit ugly this is shorter:

def neighbours(m, i, j):
    return [m[x][y] for x in [i-1,i,i+1] for y in [j-1,j,j+1] if x in range(0,len(m)) and y in range(0,len(m[x])) and (x,y) != (i,j)]
| improve this answer | |
0
0

here is some code for C#:

public Cell[,] MeetNeigbours(Cell[,] Grid)
    {
        for (int X = 0; X < Grid.GetLength(0); X++)
        {
            for (int Y = 0; Y < Grid.GetLength(1); Y++)
            {
                int NeighbourCount = 0;
                for (int i = -1; i < 2; i++)
                {
                    for (int j = -1; j < 2; j++)
                    {
                        if (CellExists(Grid, (X + i)), (Y + j) && (i != 0 && j != 0))
                        {
                            Grid[X, Y].Neighbours[NeighbourCount] = Grid[(X + i), (Y + j)];
                        }
                        if(!(i == 0 && j == 0))
                        {
                            NeighbourCount++;
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        return Grid;
    }

    public bool CellExists(Cell[,] Grid, int X, int Y)
    {
        bool returnValue = false;
        if (X >= 0 && Y >= 0)
        {
            if (X < Grid.GetLength(0) && Y < Grid.GetLength(1))
            {
                returnValue = true;
            }
        }

        return returnValue;
    }

with the "Cell" class looking like this:

public class Cell
{
    public Cell()
    {
        Neighbours = new Cell[8];
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// 0 3 5
    /// 1 X 6
    /// 2 4 7
    /// </summary>
    public Cell[] Neighbours;
}
| improve this answer | |
0
0

The approach I usually take is described on the bottom of this blog: https://royvanrijn.com/blog/2019/01/longest-path/

Instead of hardcoding the directions or having two nested loops I like to use a single integer loop for the 8 ‘directions’ and use (i % 3)-1 and (i / 3)-1; do check out the blog with images.

It doesn’t nest as deep and is easily written, not a lot of code needed!

| improve this answer | |
0
0

This was really helpful to me in a recent project, so here's @Seb 's pseudo-code implementation in swift. This is assuming that the two-dimensional array is square:

func adjacentIndexPaths(to indexPath: IndexPath) -> [IndexPath] {
var neighboringSquareIndexes: [IndexPath] = []

// gridSquareCount is the size of the 2D array. For example, in an 8 x 8 [[Array]], gridSquareCount is 8
let maxIndex = gridSquareCount - 1
var neighborRowIndex = max(0, indexPath.section - 1)
var neighborColumnIndex = max(0, indexPath.row - 1)

while neighborRowIndex <= min(indexPath.section + 1, maxIndex) {
    while neighborColumnIndex <= min(indexPath.row + 1, maxIndex) {
        if neighborRowIndex != indexPath.section || neighborColumnIndex != indexPath.row {
            neighboringSquareIndexes.append(IndexPath(row: neighborColumnIndex, section: neighborRowIndex))
        }
        neighborColumnIndex += 1
    }
    neighborRowIndex += 1
    neighborColumnIndex = max(0, indexPath.row - 1)
}

return neighboringSquareIndexes }
| improve this answer | |
0
0

In javascript

    let arr = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9]]

        function getNeighborsNumbersAtIthJth(i, j) {
            let allPosibleIndexes = [
                [i - 1, j],
                [i, j - 1],
                [i - 1, j - 1],
                [i + 1, j],
                [i, j + 1],
                [i + 1, j + 1],
                [i + 1, j - 1],
                [i - 1, j + 1]
            ];
            let allPosibleValues = []
            allPosibleIndexes.forEach(([i, j]) => {
                try {
                    allPosibleValues.push(arr[i][j])
                } catch (err) {

                }
            })
            return allPosibleValues.filter(v => v != undefined);
        }
        console.log(getNeighborsNumbersAtIthJth(1, 1));//[2, 4, 1, 8, 6, 9, 7, 3]
        console.log(getNeighborsNumbersAtIthJth(0, 1));//[1, 5, 3, 6, 4]
        console.log(getNeighborsNumbersAtIthJth(0, 0));//[4, 2, 5]
| improve this answer | |

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