56

convert float into varchar in SQL server without scientific notation and trimming decimals.

for Ex:

i have float value 1000.2324422, then it would be converted into varchar as same 1000.2324422.

there would have any number of decimal values..float value comes randomly.

11 Answers 11

77

Casting or converting to VARCHAR(MAX) or anything else did not work for me using large integers (in float fields) such as 167382981, which always came out '1.67383e+008'.

What did work was STR().

  • 7
    That's better but actually I had to do LTRIM(STR(someField)) as by default it will return a VARCHAR(10), filling with spaces if the number does not have 10 digits – Evren Kuzucuoglu Jun 19 '13 at 13:58
  • 4
    for some reason on sql 2008 r2 I got ******* values when I used STR() on 12 digit values. I had to use @Chris 's approach instead – Slider345 Jan 24 '17 at 23:56
39

Neither str() or cast(float as nvarchar(18)) worked for me.

What did end up working was converting to an int and then converting to an nvarchar like so:

 convert(nvarchar(18),convert(bigint,float))
  • 3
    cast(cast(fieldname as bigint) as nvarchar(18)) would also be an option. – JP Hellemons Feb 19 '18 at 14:50
  • Converting to Int can quickly run you into an overflow, as above, bigint is better! – greggers Mar 16 '18 at 18:05
  • @JPHellemons Thanks a lot for this, that saved me time to get something done! – Pedram Salamati Aug 23 '18 at 23:28
27

STR function works nice. I had float coming back after doing some calculations and needed to change to VARCHAR, but was getting scientific notation randonly as well. I made this transformation after all the calcs

 ltrim(rtrim(str(someField)))
  • 2
    This helps a lot. Also, be aware that the default length for str is 10. So it will get truncated if you assign to a fixed length varchar less than this. For example: declare @x varchar(9) = str(1); will assign 9 spaces to @x – andyb Jun 13 '13 at 15:21
  • I enclosed my field into str(field) and everything work perfect. Thanks :) – Atta H. Apr 7 '16 at 15:27
  • yes, i m using the same solution, but i also specify the precision like in this post: stackoverflow.com/questions/3715675/… – elle0087 Aug 1 '16 at 8:16
  • For me, str works for integer values, but it rounds non-integer ones to the nearest int. So str(0.2) returns 0. This on MSSQL 2008 R2. – Ed Avis Apr 26 at 13:40
6

Try CAST(CAST(@value AS bigint) AS varchar)

  • But that works for integers only, while the questioner asked about floats. – Ed Avis Apr 26 at 13:37
3

This works CONVERT(VARCHAR(100), CONVERT(DECIMAL(30, 15), fieldname))

2

This is not relevant to this particular case because of the decimals, but may help people who google the heading. Integer fields convert fine to varchars, but floats change to scientific notation. A very quick way to change a float quickly if you do not have decimals is therefore to change the field first to an integer and then change it to a varchar.

2

Try this:

SELECT REPLACE(RTRIM(REPLACE(REPLACE(RTRIM(REPLACE(CAST(CAST(YOUR_FLOAT_COLUMN_NAME AS DECIMAL(18,9)) AS VARCHAR(20)),'0',' ')),' ','0'),'.',' ')),' ','.') FROM YOUR_TABLE_NAME
  1. Casting as DECIMAL will put decimal point on every value, whether it had one before or not.
  2. Casting as VARCHAR allows you to use the REPLACE function
  3. First REPLACE zeros with spaces, then RTRIM to get rid of all trailing spaces (formerly zeros), then REPLACE remaining spaces with zeros.
  4. Then do the same for the period to get rid of it for numbers with no decimal values.
  • Bravo! This is the only solution I've seen that handles non-integer values correctly, and doesn't cruft up the results with leading or trailing zeroes or spaces. I created a user-defined function to do it. Should I edit the answer to give it as a function definition? – Ed Avis Apr 26 at 13:47
0

You will have to test your data VERY well. This can get messy. Here is an example of results simply by multiplying the value by 10. Run this to see what happens. On my SQL Server 2017 box, at the 3rd query I get a bunch of *********. If you CAST as BIGINT it should work every time. But if you don't and don't test enough data you could run into problems later on, so don't get sucked into thinking it will work on all of your data unless you test the maximum expected value.

 Declare @Floater AS FLOAT =100000003.141592653
    SELECT CAST(ROUND(@Floater,0) AS VARCHAR(30) ), 
            CONVERT(VARCHAR(100),ROUND(@Floater,0)), 
            STR(@Floater)

    SET  @Floater =@Floater *10
    SELECT CAST(ROUND(@Floater,0) AS VARCHAR(30) ), 
            CONVERT(VARCHAR(100),ROUND(@Floater,0)), 
            STR(@Floater)

    SET  @Floater =@Floater *100
    SELECT CAST(ROUND(@Floater,0) AS VARCHAR(30) ), 
            CONVERT(VARCHAR(100),ROUND(@Floater,0)), 
            STR(@Floater)
0

Below is an example where we can convert float value without any scientific notation.

DECLARE @Floater AS FLOAT = 100000003.141592653

SELECT CAST(ROUND(@Floater, 0) AS VARCHAR(30))
      ,CONVERT(VARCHAR(100), ROUND(@Floater, 0))
      ,STR(@Floater)
      ,LEFT(FORMAT(@Floater, ''), CHARINDEX('.', FORMAT(@Floater, '')) - 1)

SET @Floater = @Floater * 10

SELECT CAST(ROUND(@Floater, 0) AS VARCHAR(30))
      ,CONVERT(VARCHAR(100), ROUND(@Floater, 0))
      ,STR(@Floater)
      ,LEFT(FORMAT(@Floater, ''), CHARINDEX('.', FORMAT(@Floater, '')) - 1)

SET @Floater = @Floater * 100

SELECT CAST(ROUND(@Floater, 0) AS VARCHAR(30))
      ,CONVERT(VARCHAR(100), ROUND(@Floater, 0))
      ,STR(@Floater)
      ,LEFT(FORMAT(@Floater, ''), CHARINDEX('.', FORMAT(@Floater, '')) - 1)

SELECT LEFT(FORMAT(@Floater, ''), CHARINDEX('.', FORMAT(@Floater, '')) - 1)
      ,FORMAT(@Floater, '')

In the above example, we can see that the format function is useful for us. FORMAT() function returns always nvarchar.

0

I have another solution since the STR() function would result some blank spaces, so I use the FORMAT() function as folowing example:

SELECT ':' + STR(1000.2324422), ':' + FORMAT(1000.2324422,'##.#######'), ':' + FORMAT(1000.2324422,'##')

The result of above code would be:

:      1000 :1000.2324422   :1000
-1

This works:

Suppose

dbo.AsDesignedBites.XN1E1 = 4016519.564`

For the following string:

'POLYGON(('+STR(dbo.AsDesignedBites.XN1E1, 11, 3)+'...

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