6

Is there a better way of simultaneously inserting and extending a list? Here is an ugly example of how I'm currently doing it. (lets say I want to insert '2.4' and '2.6' after the '2' element):

>>> a = ['1', '2', '3', '4']
>>> b = a[:a.index('2')+1] + ['2.4', '2.6'] + a[a.index('2'):]
>>> b
<<< ['1', '2', '2.4', '2.6', '3', '4']
  • Are you trying to maintain the list in sorted order? If so, that question's been asked. – S.Lott Mar 16 '09 at 21:19
  • Minor pendantic comment, ['1', '2', '2.4', '2.6', '2', '3', '4'] has a duplicated the '2' – Drew Mar 16 '09 at 21:20
15
>>> a = ['1', '2', '3', '4']
>>> a
['1', '2', '3', '4']
>>> i = a.index('2') + 1  # after the item '2'
>>> a[i:i] = ['2.4', '2.6']
>>> a
['1', '2', '2.4', '2.6', '3', '4']
>>>
5

You can easily insert a single element using list.insert(i, x), which Python defines as s[i:i] = [x].

a = ['1', '2', '3', '4']
for elem in reversed(['2.4', '2.6']):
    a.insert(a.index('2')+1, elem))

If you want to insert a list, you can make your own function that omits the []:

def iextend(lst, i, x):
    lst[i:i] = x

a = ['1', '2', '3', '4']
iextend(a, a.index('2')+1, ['2.4', '2.6']
# a  = ['1', '2', '2.4', '2.6', '3', '4']
2

I'm not entirely clear on what you're doing; if you want to add values, and have the list remain in order, it's cleaner (and probably still faster) to just sort the whole thing:

a.extend(['2.4', '2.6'])
a.sort()
2

Have a look at the bisect module. I think it does what you want.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.