17

I was trying to provide a common DataStore<Preferences> so that the same preference file could be used in multiple places but I got the helpful error message:

Cannot find symbol: DaggerMyApplication_HiltComponents_SingletonC.builder()

@Module
@InstallIn(ApplicationComponent::class)
object DataStoreModule {
    
    @Provides
    fun provideDataStore(@ApplicationContext context: Context): DataStore<Preferences> = context.createDataStore("settings")
}

I can however do the following and use it within an @Inject constructor.

@Singleton
class DataStoreProvider @Inject constructor(@ApplicationContext context: Context) {

    val dataStore: DataStore<Preferences> = context.createDataStore("settings")
}

I assume that the extension createDataStore is doing something that Hilt does not like but I'd appreciate an explanation of what is going on even if the problem is not solvable.

1
  • Please add your Gradle. Dec 12, 2020 at 11:24

3 Answers 3

27

This worked for me:

    @Provides
    @Singleton
    fun dataStore(@ApplicationContext appContext: Context): DataStore<Preferences> =
        appContext.createDataStore("settings")

The idea is putting @Singleton behind the provider method.


Update on Feb 9, 2021:
Preferably, create a manager and provide that:

class DataStoreManager(appContext: Context) {

    private val settingsDataStore = appContext.createDataStore("settings")

    suspend fun setThemeMode(mode: Int) {
        settingsDataStore.edit { settings ->
            settings[Settings.NIGHT_MODE] = mode
        }
    }

    val themeMode: Flow<Int> = settingsDataStore.data.map { preferences ->
        preferences[Settings.NIGHT_MODE] ?: AppCompatDelegate.MODE_NIGHT_UNSPECIFIED
    }

}

AppModule:

@InstallIn(SingletonComponent::class)
@Module
class AppModule {
    @Provides
    @Singleton
    fun dataStoreManager(@ApplicationContext appContext: Context): DataStoreManager =
        DataStoreManager(appContext)

Update on March 20, 2021:
Version 1.0.0-alpha07

private val Context.dataStore by preferencesDataStore("settings")

class DataStoreManager(appContext: Context) {

    private val settingsDataStore = appContext.dataStore

    suspend fun setThemeMode(mode: Int) {
        settingsDataStore.edit { settings ->
            settings[Settings.NIGHT_MODE] = mode
        }
    }

    val themeMode: Flow<Int> = settingsDataStore.data.map { preferences ->
        preferences[Settings.NIGHT_MODE] ?: AppCompatDelegate.MODE_NIGHT_UNSPECIFIED
    }
}

Update on May 1, 2021: @Florian is totally right, I had forgotten that.

Remove dataStoreManager provider. Then,

private val Context.dataStore by preferencesDataStore("settings")

@Singleton //You can ignore this annotation as return `datastore` from `preferencesDataStore` is singletone
class DataStoreManager @Inject constructor(@ApplicationContext appContext: Context) {

    private val settingsDataStore = appContext.dataStore

    suspend fun setThemeMode(mode: Int) {
        settingsDataStore.edit { settings ->
            settings[Settings.NIGHT_MODE] = mode
        }
    }

    val themeMode: Flow<Int> = settingsDataStore.data.map { preferences ->
        preferences[Settings.NIGHT_MODE] ?: AppCompatDelegate.MODE_NIGHT_UNSPECIFIED
    }

}
2
  • 2
    New release of DS removed Context.createDataStore extension function Use now: private val Context.settingsDataStore by preferencesDataStore("settings")
    – JaviMar
    Mar 19, 2021 at 16:29
  • 1
    The manager should have an @Inject constructor instead of a @Provides method May 1, 2021 at 7:58
12

As Dr.jacky mention, create a manager is now recommended way, but you can still use PreferenceDataStoreFactory and create Preferences DataStore singleton:

@Provides
@Singleton
fun providePreferencesDataStore(@ApplicationContext appContext: Context): DataStore<Preferences> =
    PreferenceDataStoreFactory.create(
        produceFile = {
            appContext.preferencesDataStoreFile(PREFERENCES_STORE_NAME)
        }
    )
1
  • 4
    This approach was also recommended in the datastore codelab by Google May 1, 2021 at 9:59
5

I used DataStore<Preferences> with Hilt as following.

PersistenceModule.kt

@Module
@InstallIn(SingletonComponent::class)
object PersistenceModule {

    @Provides
    @Singleton
    fun provideDataStoreManager(@ApplicationContext context: Context): DataStoreManager {
        return DataStoreManager(context)
    }
}

DataStoreManager.kt

class DataStoreManager @Inject constructor(@ApplicationContext private val context: Context) {

    private val Context.dataStore: DataStore<Preferences> by preferencesDataStore(STORE_NAME)

    private suspend fun <T> DataStore<Preferences>.getFromLocalStorage(
        PreferencesKey: Preferences.Key<T>, func: T.() -> Unit) {
        data.catch {
            if (it is IOException) {
                emit(emptyPreferences())
            } else {
                throw it
            }
        }.map {
            it[PreferencesKey]
        }.collect {
            it?.let { func.invoke(it as T) }
        }
    }

    suspend fun <T> storeValue(key: Preferences.Key<T>, value: T) {
        context.dataStore.edit {
            it[key] = value
        }
    }

    suspend fun <T> readValue(key: Preferences.Key<T>, responseFunc: T.() -> Unit) {
        context.dataStore.getFromLocalStorage(key) {
            responseFunc.invoke(this)
        }
    }
}

ViewModel.kt

@HiltViewModel
class HomeViewModel @Inject constructor(
    private val dataStore: DataStoreManager
) : LiveCoroutinesViewModel() {

    fun readNextReviewTime() {
        viewModelScope.launch {
            dataStore.readValue(nextReviewTime) {
                // Here you can do something with value.
            }
        }
    }
}

Update

@HiltViewModel
class TranslateViewModel @Inject constructor(
    definitionRepository: DefinitionRepository,
    translateRepository: TranslateRepository,
    val dataStoreManager: DataStoreManager
) : LiveCoroutinesViewModel() {

    init {
        readValueInViewModelScope(sourceLanguage, "ta") { // use value here }
        readValueInViewModelScope(targetLanguage, "si") { // use value here }
    }

    private fun <T> readValueInViewModelScope(key: Preferences.Key<T>, defaultValue: T, onCompleted: T.() -> Unit) {
        viewModelScope.launch {
            dataStoreManager.readValue(key) {
                if (this == null) {
                    storeValueInViewModelScope(key, defaultValue)
                } else {
                    onCompleted.invoke(this)
                }
            }
        }
    }

    fun <T> storeValueInViewModelScope(key: Preferences.Key<T>, value: T) {
        viewModelScope.launch {
            dataStoreManager.storeValue(key, value)
        }
    }
}
1
  • Why do you use @Provides and @Inject for the DataStoreManager? One of them is enough.
    – gts13
    Sep 15, 2021 at 14:29

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