472

Here is the script to create my tables:

CREATE TABLE clients (
   client_i INT(11),
   PRIMARY KEY (client_id)
);
CREATE TABLE projects (
   project_id INT(11) UNSIGNED,
   client_id INT(11) UNSIGNED,
   PRIMARY KEY (project_id)
);
CREATE TABLE posts (
   post_id INT(11) UNSIGNED,
   project_id INT(11) UNSIGNED,
   PRIMARY KEY (post_id)
);

In my PHP code, when deleting a client, I want to delete all projects posts:

DELETE 
FROM posts
INNER JOIN projects ON projects.project_id = posts.project_id
WHERE projects.client_id = :client_id;

The posts table does not have a foreign key client_id, only project_id. I want to delete the posts in projects that have the passed client_id.

This is not working right now because no posts are deleted.

  • 10
    I think Yehosef answer should be the accepted one, since he uses Join as you asked and that it performs better than using an IN clause as yukondude proposed... – Gerardo Grignoli Apr 22 '14 at 19:34
  • 2
    The preferred pattern is a DELETE posts FROM posts JOIN projects ..., rather than an IN (subquery) pattern. (The answer from Yehosef gives an example of the preferred pattern.) – spencer7593 May 25 '15 at 17:41
  • @GerardoGrignoli, it performs better for a particular engine or version of MySQL? There's no reason why the two queries should perform any differently, since AFAIK they are identical. Of course, if I had a nickel for everytime my query optimizer did something stupid.... – Paul Draper Feb 12 '16 at 1:12
  • You can also use alias for the table name and use that. – biniam Jul 4 '16 at 15:54

13 Answers 13

1198
+50

You just need to specify that you want to delete the entries from the posts table:

DELETE posts
FROM posts
INNER JOIN projects ON projects.project_id = posts.project_id
WHERE projects.client_id = :client_id

EDIT: For more information you can see this alternative answer

  • 114
    It should be noted that this is the correct answer because the join forces you to use "DELETE posts FROM posts" instead of the normal "DELETE FROM posts", since the table to delete is no longer unambiguous. Thanks! – siannopollo Apr 12 '12 at 20:23
  • 8
    Note you cannot use the 'as' method here e.g inner join projects as p on p.project_id ... – zzapper Apr 26 '12 at 17:01
  • 14
    Actually you can use an alias for joined tables, but not for the main table (posts). "DELETE posts FROM posts INNER JOIN projects p ON p.project_id = posts.project_id" – Weboide May 29 '12 at 15:44
  • 80
    "If you declare an alias for a table, you must use the alias when referring to the table" like so DELETE d FROM posts AS d JOIN projects AS p ON ... – KCD Oct 30 '12 at 22:11
  • 14
    this is the best answer because you can even delete from both tables in one action DELETE posts , projects FROM posts INNER JOIN projects ON projects.project_id = posts.project_id WHERE projects.client_id = :client_id – Developerium Apr 22 '14 at 9:52
76

Since you are selecting multiple tables, The table to delete from is no longer unambiguous. You need to select:

DELETE posts FROM posts
INNER JOIN projects ON projects.project_id = posts.project_id
WHERE projects.client_id = :client_id

In this case, table_name1 and table_name2 are the same table, so this will work:

DELETE projects FROM posts INNER JOIN [...]

You can even delete from both tables if you wanted to:

DELETE posts, projects FROM posts INNER JOIN [...]

Note that order by and limit don't work for multi-table deletes.

Also be aware that if you declare an alias for a table, you must use the alias when referring to the table:

DELETE p FROM posts as p INNER JOIN [...]

Contributions from Carpetsmoker and etc.

  • 3
    If you're making a better answer - at least you could make the SQL more readable. All the other SQL references in this question have capitalized keywords (except for one with 0 votes). I'm not sure why you reverted my edits. – Yehosef Apr 13 '15 at 10:21
  • 3
    @Yehosef, There's a group of people who find the CAPS really glaring. I believe I'm not the only one, I've seen quite a few people going lowercase style too. – Pacerier Apr 13 '15 at 12:09
  • 1
    fair enough - I respect your right to write your answer in the style that you like ;) – Yehosef Apr 13 '15 at 14:02
  • 7
    To add to the caps/no caps discussion, true, you can use whichever style you like, but in your answer, you're actually mixing styles where you find convenient - the ON is capitalized. To less-experienced developers, it may convey that it's OK to be messy and inconsistent in terms of style. – Shade Jul 4 '16 at 15:08
  • 13
    CAPS KEYWORDS are not glaring. they ARE MAKING the QUERIES READABLE ;) – Sachem Nov 23 '17 at 21:18
49

Or the same thing, with a slightly different (IMO friendlier) syntax:

DELETE FROM posts 
USING posts, projects 
WHERE projects.project_id = posts.project_id AND projects.client_id = :client_id;

BTW, with mysql using joins is almost always a way faster than subqueries...

  • What does the USING mean? – CMCDragonkai Mar 30 '15 at 0:59
  • 1
    Good explanation of USING: stackoverflow.com/questions/11366006/mysql-on-vs-using – bigtex777 Apr 8 '15 at 18:08
  • 10
    @bigtex777: Please note that keyword USING in SELECT statements has little to do with the same keyword in a DELETE statement. In SELECTs it specifies the list of columns to join on, while in DELETEs it's a list of all tables in a join – ivanhoe Apr 16 '15 at 1:29
39

You can also use ALIAS like this it works just used it on my database! t is the table need deleting from!

DELETE t FROM posts t
INNER JOIN projects p ON t.project_id = p.project_id
AND t.client_id = p.client_id
  • 1
    this is useful on compound key joins to avoid repeating the table names – Marquez Jun 23 '14 at 19:25
  • 1
    "Actually you can use an alias for joined tables, but not for the main table (posts). 'DELETE posts FROM posts INNER JOIN projects p ON p.project_id = posts.project_id'" —@Weboide – Jeaf Gilbert Oct 23 '14 at 9:54
  • 1
    Actually (quoting from dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/delete.html) "If you declare an alias for a table, you must use the alias when referring to the table: DELETE t1 FROM test AS t1, test2 WHERE ..." so using an alias is fine. – Peter Bowers Feb 25 '15 at 7:26
24

I'm more used to the subquery solution to this, but I have not tried it in MySQL:

DELETE  FROM posts
WHERE   project_id IN (
            SELECT  project_id
            FROM    projects
            WHERE   client_id = :client_id
        );
  • 84
    You should really avoid using the IN keyword in SQL (even though it's usually easier to understand for beginners) and use JOIN instead (when possible), as subqueries usually make things a lot slower. – user276648 Oct 28 '11 at 2:05
  • 14
    This tends to crash the DB when there are a huge number of rows returned by the sub query. It is also immensely slow. – Raj Feb 23 '12 at 15:38
  • 2
    @yukondude Indeed "IN" is a lot easier to understand than "JOIN" at 1st, and that's why people who are not really familiar with SQL will end up writing "IN" everywhere, while they could use "JOIN" which performs better (or a whooole lot better, depending on the query). I remember several years ago, almost all my SQL queries would be rewritten by someone who actually knew how to write good queries. That's why I added the comment to avoid "IN", so that people would know that if possible, they should avoid using it. – user276648 May 24 '12 at 9:58
  • 10
    The very reason I came to this page is because the query I wrote with an IN statement was dog slow. Definitely avoid the accepted answer here. – MikeKulls Jun 14 '13 at 2:15
  • 4
    As old as this question is, it is important to know WHY you should use JOIN instead of IN. When that where condition runs on a row, it is going to run that query inside IN. That means, if there are 100 rows that needs to be checked against that WHERE, that subquery is going to be run 100 times. Whereas a JOIN will only run ONCE. So, as your db gets bigger and bigger, that query is going to take longer and longer to finish. @markus just because something is not critical does not mean you should write bad code. Writing it a little better will save you a lot of time and headache in the future. :) – RisingSun Mar 7 '15 at 0:29
11

MySQL DELETE records with JOIN

You generally use INNER JOIN in the SELECT statement to select records from a table that have corresponding records in other tables. We can also use the INNER JOIN clause with the DELETE statement to delete records from a table and also the corresponding records in other tables e.g., to delete records from both T1 and T2 tables that meet a particular condition, you use the following statement:

DELETE T1, T2
FROM T1
INNER JOIN T2 ON T1.key = T2.key
WHERE condition

Notice that you put table names T1 and T2 between DELETE and FROM. If you omit the T1 table, the DELETE statement only deletes records in the T2 table, and if you omit the T2 table, only records in the T1 table are deleted.

The join condition T1.key = T2.key specifies the corresponding records in the T2 table that need be deleted.

The condition in the WHERE clause specifies which records in the T1 and T2 that need to be deleted.

10

Single Table Delete:

In order to delete entries from posts table:

DELETE ps 
FROM clients C 
INNER JOIN projects pj ON C.client_id = pj.client_id
INNER JOIN posts ps ON pj.project_id = ps.project_id
WHERE C.client_id = :client_id;

In order to delete entries from projects table:

DELETE pj 
FROM clients C 
INNER JOIN projects pj ON C.client_id = pj.client_id
INNER JOIN posts ps ON pj.project_id = ps.project_id
WHERE C.client_id = :client_id;

In order to delete entries from clients table:

DELETE C
FROM clients C 
INNER JOIN projects pj ON C.client_id = pj.client_id
INNER JOIN posts ps ON pj.project_id = ps.project_id
WHERE C.client_id = :client_id;

Multiple Tables Delete:

In order to delete entries from multiple tables out of the joined results you need to specify the table names after DELETE as comma separated list:

Suppose you want to delete entries from all the three tables (posts,projects,clients) for a particular client :

DELETE C,pj,ps 
FROM clients C 
INNER JOIN projects pj ON C.client_id = pj.client_id
INNER JOIN posts ps ON pj.project_id = ps.project_id
WHERE C.client_id = :client_id
7

Try like below:

DELETE posts.*,projects.* 
FROM posts
INNER JOIN projects ON projects.project_id = posts.project_id
WHERE projects.client_id = :client_id;
  • 3
    What's the point of the .*? – Pacerier Mar 20 '15 at 4:40
4

Another method of deleting using a sub select that is better than using IN would be WHERE EXISTS

DELETE  FROM posts
WHERE   EXISTS ( SELECT  1 
                 FROM    projects
                 WHERE   projects.client_id = posts.client_id);

One reason to use this instead of the join is that a DELETE with JOIN forbids the use of LIMIT. If you wish to delete in blocks so as not to produce full table locks, you can add LIMIT use this DELETE WHERE EXISTS method.

  • 1
    Can this query be written with "aliases"? It isn't very clear from the syntax how the posts within EXISTS() is the same posts that the rows are deleted from. (IMHO anyway) – MattBianco Oct 3 '14 at 14:18
  • I hear you, but aliases aren't allowed in the table to delete from. The "posts" in the sub query has to be the full table name, which means that if you wanted to re-use that table in your sub-select From clause, you'd have to alias it there. – Jim Clouse Oct 3 '14 at 15:12
  • 1
    This works: DELETE p FROM posts p WHERE EXISTS ( SELECT 1 FROM projects WHERE projects.client_id = p.client_id); – MattBianco Oct 6 '14 at 6:40
4
mysql> INSERT INTO tb1 VALUES(1,1),(2,2),(3,3),(6,60),(7,70),(8,80);

mysql> INSERT INTO tb2 VALUES(1,1),(2,2),(3,3),(4,40),(5,50),(9,90);

DELETE records FROM one table :

mysql> DELETE tb1 FROM tb1,tb2 WHERE tb1.id= tb2.id;

DELETE RECORDS FROM both tables:

mysql> DELETE tb2,tb1 FROM tb2 JOIN tb1 USING(id);
1

If join does not work for you you may try this solution. It is for deleting orphan records from t1 when not using foreign keys + specific where condition. I.e. it deletes records from table1, that have empty field "code" and that do not have records in table2, matching by field "name".

delete table1 from table1 t1 
    where  t1.code = '' 
    and 0=(select count(t2.name) from table2 t2 where t2.name=t1.name);
0

Try this,

DELETE posts.*
FROM posts
INNER JOIN projects ON projects.project_id = posts.project_id
WHERE projects.client_id = :client_id
-3

-- Note that you can not use an alias over the table where you need delete

DELETE tbl_pagos_activos_usuario
FROM tbl_pagos_activos_usuario, tbl_usuarios b, tbl_facturas c
Where tbl_pagos_activos_usuario.usuario=b.cedula
and tbl_pagos_activos_usuario.cod=c.cod
and tbl_pagos_activos_usuario.rif=c.identificador
and tbl_pagos_activos_usuario.usuario=c.pay_for
and tbl_pagos_activos_usuario.nconfppto=c.nconfppto
and NOT ISNULL(tbl_pagos_activos_usuario.nconfppto)
and c.estatus=50

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