11

I'm at my wits end with this. It seems like it should work, I've been wrestling with it for hours, but I'm not sure what's wrong. This is the smallest example I could come up with. I even have a type guard.

/** @typedef {{ a: string }} TypeA*/
/** @typedef {{ b: string }} TypeB*/
/** @typedef {(TypeA | TypeB) } TypeC */

/** @type {TypeC} */
let typeC;

console.log(typeC.b) // autocompletion for property b doesn't work

I get the error:

Property 'b' does not exist on type '{ a: string; } | { b: string; }'.
  Property 'b' does not exist on type '{ a: string; }'.ts(2339)
6
  • Not sure what your setup is, but whenever I have issues with jsdoc, it's usually because the comments weren't updated with changes. If you just remove the jsdoc and let your IDE re-generate them, it will help you figure out what it should be/what the issue is
    – mwilson
    Dec 14, 2020 at 19:02
  • I'm trying to add some type safety in my ide to javascript since i'm not using typescript. Dec 15, 2020 at 15:08
  • 1
    Because the jsdoc types are being processed by the typescript-language-server. Dec 16, 2020 at 17:39
  • 1
    So you are using typescript
    – mwilson
    Dec 16, 2020 at 19:27
  • 1
    I suppose what I meant by "not using typescript" is that I'm not writing typescript. But I am using the typescript compiler, and I didn't find a typescript-language-server- tag, so I tagged it typescript. Dec 18, 2020 at 21:22

3 Answers 3

9

Edit: The root of this issue is my misunderstanding of the union operator | and how TypeScript narrows types. Tsserver, the typescript language service, is what was interpreting these JSDoc comments and providing language services like autocomplete. I'll write some TypeScript to explain properly how types were working in this situation.

Given this situation:

type TypeA = { a: string };
type TypeB = { b: string };
type TypeC = TypeA | TypeB;

const typeC: TypeC = { /* omitted */ };

typeC could either be TypeA or TypeB, but we don't know which one. So, TypeScript isn't going to let us access typeC.a or typeC.b because we haven't written any code that narrows down typeC to either TypeA or TypeB. That's why the autocomplete isn't working. And that's why in my previous answer below duck typing, or using a type guard that asserts a variable is TypeB, works.

So with a union, you need to narrow down that type at run time to be able to safely access the properties. Possibly by checking whether a set of properties unique to one of the possible types is present, or an assertion using as, or something else.

Another approach is instead to use an intersection. An intersection says a type has all the properties of both types. This would work:

type TypeC = TypeA & TypeB;

Then we can access typeC.a and typeC.b.

Below is my previous answer, kept for historical reasons.


I found that a jsdoc style type guard lets me access the properties of TypeC if I am able to duck type it as TypeB.

/** @typedef {{ a: string }} TypeA*/
/** @typedef {{ b: string }} TypeB*/
/** @typedef {(TypeA | TypeB) } TypeC */

/**
 * @param {*} value
 * @returns {value is TypeB}
 */
function typeIsB(value) {
  return true;
}

/** @type {TypeC} */
let typeC;

if (typeIsB(typeC)) {
  console.log(typeC.b) // no error, autocomplete works when typing typeC.b
}

Screenshot of autocomplete working:

enter image description here

1
2

When you say that a value is of type A or B, the typescript compiler does not know which type of value is refrenced by that variable.

/** @typedef {{ a: string }} TypeA*/
/** @typedef {{ b: string }} TypeB*/
/** @typedef {(TypeA | TypeB) } TypeC */

/** @type {TypeC} */
let typeC;

console.log(typeC.b) // autocompletion for property b doesn't work

You need a condition to determine the actual type of the value referenced by typeC. For example:

if ('a' in typeC) {
    console.log(typeC.a) // autocompletion for property a works       
} else {
    console.log(typeC.b) // autocompletion for property b works       
}
1
  • Wow! I didn't know of 'a' in obj! I always did if (obj.a) {}, which works but sometimes yields a nasty property "a" doesn't exist on object "obj" error...
    – Julesses
    Mar 14 at 18:41
1

I think you are looking for the intersection of A and B, not the union. Here is the typescript code for your issue fixed:

interface A {
  a: string;
}

interface B {
  b: string;
}

type C = A & B;
2
  • 1
    I want TypeC to be TypeA or TypeB, not both. AFAIK, intersections guarantee the presence of each type's properties. I could do intersections, if I can someone document that it's either one or the other, not both. Dec 15, 2020 at 15:07
  • 1
    I think my code example in my question was poorly written and misleading. I think my implementation does imply I want an intersection. Sorry about that. I've edited it to be more clear, and also added an answer of what worked for me. Dec 15, 2020 at 15:14

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