public class Foo
{
    public string FooId{get;set;}
    public Boo Boo{get;set;}
}


public class Boo
{
    public string BooId{get;set;}
    public Foo Foo{get;set;}
}

I was trying to do this in Entity Framework when I got the error:

Unable to determine the principal end of an association between the types 'ConsoleApplication5.Boo' and 'ConsoleApplication5.Foo'. The principal end of this association must be explicitly configured using either the relationship fluent API or data annotations.

I have seen questions on StackOverflow with a solution for this error, but I want to understand what the term "principal end" means.

up vote 350 down vote accepted

In one-to-one relation one end must be principal and second end must be dependent. Principal end is the one which will be inserted first and which can exist without the dependent one. Dependent end is the one which must be inserted after the principal because it has foreign key to the principal.

In case of entity framework FK in dependent must also be its PK so in your case you should use:

public class Boo
{
    [Key, ForeignKey("Foo")]
    public string BooId{get;set;}
    public Foo Foo{get;set;}
}

Or fluent mapping

modelBuilder.Entity<Foo>()
            .HasOptional(f => f.Boo)
            .WithRequired(s => s.Foo);
  • 4
    @Ladislav, I need to make two independant tables that both have an optional reference to each other (one to one), I want them both to have their own PKs each, how is this possible? I posted a separate question. – Shimmy Nov 28 '12 at 16:15
  • 7
    You have no idea how many hours it took to find an answer to this - ms documentation is POOOOOOP ty. – gangelo May 15 '13 at 17:25
  • 1
    Note you may need to add using System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations.Schema; to get ForeignKey in VS2012 – stuartdotnet Jun 28 '13 at 23:37
  • 1
    Does that mean that Foo is the principal then? – bflemi3 Nov 17 '13 at 19:04
  • 7
    @bflemi3 you are correct Boo is the dependent, requires a Foo, and gets the foreign key. Foo is the principal and can exist without a Boo. – Colin Nov 18 '13 at 10:07

You can also use the [Required] data annotation attribute to solve this:

public class Foo
{
    public string FooId { get; set; }

    public Boo Boo { get; set; }
}

public class Boo
{
    public string BooId { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public Foo Foo {get; set; }
}

Foo is required for Boo.

  • 3
    found couple of answer on SO - this is the best and simplest! – friend Jun 26 '13 at 6:42
  • 1
    Well that did it :) Thanks! – Gorgi Rankovski Aug 1 '13 at 14:24
  • 10
    Be aware that when using this solution you will get validation exceptions when you try and update a Boo that you just retrieved from the database, unless you first trigger the lazy-load of the Foo property. entityframework.codeplex.com/SourceControl/network/forks/… – NathanAldenSr Mar 7 '15 at 3:56
  • 2
    I had to rebuild my project before this worked. – Trevi Awater Sep 12 '16 at 10:33
  • 1
    shouldn't Boo Boo be virtual then? – Simon_Weaver Jan 14 '17 at 4:45

This is with reference to @Ladislav Mrnka's answer on using fluent api for configuring one-to-one relationship.

Had a situation where having FK of dependent must be it's PK was not feasible.

E.g., Foo already has one-to-many relationship with Bar.

public class Foo {
   public Guid FooId;
   public virtual ICollection<> Bars; 
}
public class Bar {
   //PK
   public Guid BarId;
   //FK to Foo
   public Guid FooId;
   public virtual Foo Foo;
}

Now, we had to add another one-to-one relationship between Foo and Bar.

public class Foo {
   public Guid FooId;
   public Guid PrimaryBarId;// needs to be removed(from entity),as we specify it in fluent api
   public virtual Bar PrimaryBar;
   public virtual ICollection<> Bars;
}
public class Bar {
   public Guid BarId;
   public Guid FooId;
   public virtual Foo PrimaryBarOfFoo;
   public virtual Foo Foo;
}

Here is how to specify one-to-one relationship using fluent api:

modelBuilder.Entity<Bar>()
            .HasOptional(p => p.PrimaryBarOfFoo)
            .WithOptionalPrincipal(o => o.PrimaryBar)
            .Map(x => x.MapKey("PrimaryBarId"));

Note that while adding PrimaryBarId needs to be removed, as we specifying it through fluent api.

Also note that method name [WithOptionalPrincipal()][1] is kind of ironic. In this case, Principal is Bar. WithOptionalDependent() description on msdn makes it more clear.

  • 1
    This can easily be shortened to: .Map(x => x.MapKey("PrimaryBarId")); – Erik Philips Jul 19 '16 at 21:52
  • 1
    @ErikPhilips Your approach does work and reduces the amount of code. Have edited my answer. Thank you. – Sudarshan_SMD Jul 21 '16 at 4:15
  • 1
    What if you actually want the PrimaryBarId property? This is ridiculous to me. If I add the property and say it's the foreign key, I get an error. But if I don't have the property, then EF will create it anyways. What's the difference? – Chris Pratt Jun 29 '17 at 16:37
  • @ChrisPratt This might not sound reasonable. I arrived at this solutions after trail and error. Was not able to configure one-to-one mapping when I had PrimayBarId property in Foo entity. Likely the same solution that you tried. Limitations in EF perhaps? – Sudarshan_SMD Jun 30 '17 at 6:42
  • 1
    Yeah, it is. I've come to find out that EF to this day has never implemented unique indexes. As a result, the only way available to map a one-to-one is to use the primary key of the principal end as the primary key of the dependent end, because a primary key is by nature unique. In other words, they half-implemented it and took a shortcut that dictates that your tables have to be design in a non-standard way. – Chris Pratt Jun 30 '17 at 13:42

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