1

I'm learning Erlang and in Erlang/OTP codebase, Cowboy and others I frequently stumble at lines like this:

_ = ets:new(ac_tab, [set, public, named_table, {read_concurrency,true}]).

Like this:

_ = erlang:cancel_timer(TimerRef).

or even like this:

_ = case Version of
    'HTTP/1.1' ->
        Transport:send(Socket, cow_http:response(StatusCode, 'HTTP/1.1',
            headers_to_list(Headers)));
    %% Do not send informational responses to HTTP/1.0 clients. (RFC7231 6.2)
    'HTTP/1.0' ->
        ok
end.

I easily can see the reason behind pattern matches like this:

ok = some_mod:some_func().

or like this:

{ok, _} = some_mod:some_func().

This way we check that some function returned a value that fits a pattern, atom ok in first case or tuple {ok, _} where _ means something we don't care about in the second one.

As for a singular _ symbol I'm in doubt as to what this means. It looks like we just could write the expression on the right side of the = sign itself, for the examples above it would look like this:

ets:new(ac_tab, [set, public, named_table, {read_concurrency,true}]).


erlang:cancel_timer(TimerRef).

case Version of
    'HTTP/1.1' ->
        Transport:send(Socket, cow_http:response(StatusCode, 'HTTP/1.1',
            headers_to_list(Headers)));
    %% Do not send informational responses to HTTP/1.0 clients. (RFC7231 6.2)
    'HTTP/1.0' ->
        ok
end.

and nothing would have changed.

  • For me it is just a placeholder, in case the return value is needed in the future, we know where to find them... though I would be more specific in at least providing the _VariableName rather than just an underscore to avoid compiler warning – Agus Dec 16 '20 at 12:19
  • What happens if you try this one without any variable binding? https://erlang.org/doc/man/erlang.html#display-1 – Nalin Ranjan Dec 22 '20 at 12:48
3

The _ match is used to suppress a dialyzer warning for unmatched returns.

  • Ok, thanks! Now the question is why does dialyzer consider it as necessity in such cases.. – user3357257 Dec 16 '20 at 11:47
  • 2
    If the look at the dialyzer documentation for -Wunmatched_returns it explains a bit more what is going on. – Lukas Dec 16 '20 at 12:22
1

_ is the Anonymous Variable, see Variables. It behaves like a variable, but its value is ignored.

If it stands on the left hand side of an assignment, it can be omitted. But you'll often find it in more complex structures:

{key, Value, _} = some_function(),

where you're interested just in some parts of the value.

  • I know that but I don't see the reason of using it in this specific case, this looks like meaningless for me. Your example looks fine for me as we check that some_function returns a tuple with key, value atoms on the first and second place and something we don't care on the third. – user3357257 Dec 16 '20 at 10:58

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