3

I have a 3d array of position vectors p [np.shape(p) yields (Nx, Ny, Nz, 3)] and an array Rn of n rotation matrices [np.shape(R) yields (n, 3, 3)].

I am trying to get an array PR of shape (n, Nx, Ny, Nz, 3) where the i-th (0 < i < n) entry at dimension 0 is the 3d array of position vectors p rotated by the 3x3 rotation matrix at index i of array Rn.

theta = np.arange(0, 2*np.pi, np.pi/50)
phi = np.arange(0, np.pi, np.pi/100)

a = np.arange(100)
b = np.arange(50)
p = np.array(np.meshgrid(a, b, a, indexing="xy"))
p = np.moveaxis(p, 1, 2)
p = np.moveaxis(p, 0, 3)
# np.shape(p) => (100,50,100,3) 
Rn = np.array([np.array([np.cos(theta)*np.cos(phi), np.cos(theta)*np.sin(phi), -np.sin(theta)]),
               np.array([-np.sin(phi),              np.cos(phi),               np.zeros(np.shape(phi))]),
               np.array([np.cos(phi)*np.sin(theta), np.sin(theta)*np.sin(phi), np.cos(theta)])])
Rn = np.moveaxis(Rn , 1, 2)
Rn = np.moveaxis(Rn , 0, 1)
# np.shape(Rn) => (100, 3, 3) 

So far I have attempted the following, unsuccessfully.

PR= np.matmul(Rn, p)

What is the most efficient way to perform this operation? I know how to perform this using For loops, but in the interest of efficiency I have been trying to keep things vectorized within numpy.

5

Two possible solutions are -

np.einsum("ijkl,nal->nijka", p, Rn, optimize=True)
td = np.moveaxis(np.tensordot(p, Rn, axes=((-1), (-1))), 3, 0)

I will also compare these solutions with other answers in this thread.

p = np.random.rand(10, 20, 30, 3)
Rn = np.random.rand(100, 3, 3)

es = np.einsum("ijkl,nal->nijka", p, Rn, optimize=True)
td = np.moveaxis(np.tensordot(p, Rn, axes=((-1), (-1))), 3, 0)
d = np.squeeze(np.moveaxis(np.dot(Rn, p[..., None]), 1, -2), -1)
out = ((Rn @ p.reshape(-1,3).T)
          .reshape(Rn.shape[0],3,-1) 
          .swapaxes(1,2)
          .reshape(-1, *p.shape)
      )

print(np.allclose(es, out))
print(np.allclose(td, out))
print(np.allclose(d, out))

All gives True.

If you try benchmarking their performance,

%timeit np.einsum("ijkl,nal->nijka", p, Rn, optimize=True)
%timeit np.moveaxis(np.tensordot(p, Rn, axes=((-1), (-1))), 3, 0)
%timeit ((Rn @ p.reshape(-1,3).T).reshape(Rn.shape[0],3,-1) .swapaxes(1,2).reshape(-1, *p.shape))
%timeit np.moveaxis(np.squeeze(np.dot(Rn, p[..., None]), -1), 1, -1)

Gives,

3.91 ms ± 129 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100 loops each)
4.15 ms ± 168 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100 loops each)
2.45 ms ± 29.1 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100 loops each)
29.1 ms ± 98.9 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

For an array of the given size on my system.

einsum and tensordot seems to have comparable performance while the @ solution seems the fastest. The dot solutions seems unreasonably slow though. I am not sure why since I would have imagined it's using @ under the hood.

4
  • 2
    This is one of those cases where einsum really does shine! – Frank Yellin Dec 18 '20 at 3:58
  • Can you add my answer to your timing? – Mad Physicist Dec 18 '20 at 5:31
  • 1
    @MadPhysicist, Done. But that seems to be very slow (at least in my system) and I can't am not sure why. – Ananda Dec 18 '20 at 5:44
  • Weird that is so slow. – Mad Physicist Dec 18 '20 at 6:33
3

Let's try:

out = ((Rn @ p.reshape(-1,3).T)
          .reshape(Rn.shape[0],3,-1) 
          .swapaxes(1,2)
          .reshape(-1, *p.shape)
      )
3

You don't need to do any fancy packaging since np.dot already takes care of the product of dimensions (unlike np.matmul, which broadcasts the leading dimensions together).

There are two additional steps:

  1. You need to add a trailing dimension to p to make it the product of 3x3 by 3x1 matrices.
  2. The result will have shape (n, 3, Nx, Ny, Nz, 1) because of the product. You will want to move the second dimension to the second to last and squeeze out the last one:
np.moveaxis(np.squeeze(np.dot(Rn, p[..., None]), -1), 1, -1)

OR

np.squeeze(np.moveaxis(np.dot(Rn, p[..., None]), 1, -2), -1)

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