109

I have two arrays like this:

array( 
'11' => '11',
'22' => '22',
'33' => '33',
'44' => '44'
);

array( 
'44' => '44',
'55' => '55',
'66' => '66',
'77' => '77'
);

I want to combine these two array such that it does not contains duplicate and as well as keep their original keys. For example output should be:

array( 
'11' => '11',
'22' => '22',
'33' => '33',
'44' => '44',
'55' => '55',
'66' => '66',
'77' => '77'
);

I have tried this but it is changing their original keys:

$output = array_unique( array_merge( $array1 , $array2 ) );

Any solution?

11 Answers 11

194

Just use:

$output = array_merge($array1, $array2);

That should solve it. Because you use string keys if one key occurs more than one time (like '44' in your example) one key will overwrite preceding ones with the same name. Because in your case they both have the same value anyway it doesn't matter and it will also remove duplicates.

Update: I just realised, that PHP treats the numeric string-keys as numbers (integers) and so will behave like this, what means, that it renumbers the keys too...

A workaround is to recreate the keys.

$output = array_combine($output, $output);

Update 2: I always forget, that there is also an operator (in bold, because this is really what you are looking for! :D)

$output = $array1 + $array2;

All of this can be seen in: http://php.net/manual/en/function.array-merge.php

6
  • 5
    @KingCrunch - Even though the numbers are quoted, those are not string keys and so the index will not be preserved. Example: ideone.com/I2NFT Jun 30, 2011 at 13:29
  • 1
    Really... First I wanted to talk about "a bug", but then I noticed, that the manual only talks about "numeric keys", not "integer keys". Feels a little bit confusing.
    – KingCrunch
    Jun 30, 2011 at 13:32
  • 4
    So $array1 + $array2 is short and efficient solution instead of array_merge() - array_combine() combination
    – Awan
    Jun 30, 2011 at 13:54
  • Obviously it is. I never realized the behaviour of array_merge() with numeric string-keys before and first I expected + and array_merge() behave nearly identical, but it seems, I've learned something :)
    – KingCrunch
    Jun 30, 2011 at 14:01
  • 6
    WARNING! for non-assoc arrays or if arrays has common keys $a + $b != array_merge($a, $b)
    – jmarceli
    May 8, 2018 at 15:21
38

You should take to consideration that $array1 + $array2 != $array2 + $array1

$array1 = array(
'11' => 'x1',
'22' => 'x1' 
);  

$array2 = array(
'22' => 'x2',
'33' => 'x2' 
);

with $array1 + $array2

$array1 + $array2 = array(
'11' => 'x1',
'22' => 'x1',
'33' => 'x2'
);

and with $array2 + $array1

$array2 + $array1 = array(  
'11' => 'x1',  
'22' => 'x2',  
'33' => 'x2'  
);
31

This works:

$output = $array1 + $array2;
3
  • 19
    I would not recommend this because it's behavior is very unintuitive, e.g. [1,2,3] + [4,5,6] == [1,2,3]
    – jchook
    Oct 14, 2016 at 23:56
  • @jchook What do You recommend then?
    – Michas
    Oct 15, 2016 at 0:03
  • This is what I needed, thanks. Here's why: http_build_query(array_merge($array1, $array2)) did not work for me, whereas http_build_query($array1 + $array2) did.
    – i i
    Feb 6, 2017 at 16:20
12

The new way of doing it with php7.4 is Spread operator [...]

$parts = ['apple', 'pear'];
$fruits = ['banana', 'orange', ...$parts, 'watermelon'];
var_dump($fruits);

Spread operator should have better performance than array_merge

A significant advantage of Spread operator is that it supports any traversable objects, while the array_merge function only supports arrays.

2
  • Of course, for this task, you would have tested this technique with the two numerically-keyed associative arrays and found that this approach DOES NOT provide the required behavior. 3v4l.org/KEQub This inappropriate/incorrect answer has been posted on the wrong page and has a score that will mislead researchers. Mar 16, 2023 at 21:21
  • I don't think the spread operator allows unpacking with string keys (at least on php 7.4).
    – mwm
    Jul 17, 2023 at 11:39
4

To do this, you can loop through one and append to the other:

<?php

$test1 = array( 
'11' => '11',
'22' => '22',
'33' => '33',
'44' => '44'
);

$test2 = array( 
'44' => '44',
'55' => '55',
'66' => '66',
'77' => '77'
);


function combineWithKeys($array1, $array2)
{
    foreach($array1 as $key=>$value) $array2[$key] = $value;
    asort($array2);
    return $array2;
} 

print_r(combineWithKeys($test1, $test2));

?>

UPDATE: KingCrunch came up with the best solution: print_r($array1+$array2);

1

This works:

$a = array(1 => 1, 2 => 2, 3 => 3);
$b = array(4 => 4, 5 => 5, 6 => 6);
$c = $a + $b;
print_r($c);
1

Warning! $array1 + $array2 overwrites keys, so my solution (for multidimensional arrays) is to use array_unique()

array_unique(array_merge($a, $b), SORT_REGULAR);

Notice:

5.2.10+ Changed the default value of sort_flags back to SORT_STRING.

5.2.9 Default is SORT_REGULAR.

5.2.8- Default is SORT_STRING

It perfectly works. Hope it helps same.

2
  • 1
    array_merge() doesn't preserve the keys though. The array created by that is 0 indexed.
    – HPierce
    Nov 21, 2017 at 12:20
  • 1
    @HPierce well, in multidimensional array addition case, some information will be lost using +. Take a look at: PHPFiddle , $b[0] will be lost... Nov 22, 2017 at 6:00
1

If you are using PHP 7.4 or above, you can use the spread operator ... as the following examples from the PHP Docs:

$arr1 = [1, 2, 3];
$arr2 = [...$arr1]; //[1, 2, 3]
$arr3 = [0, ...$arr1]; //[0, 1, 2, 3]
$arr4 = array(...$arr1, ...$arr2, 111); //[1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 111]
$arr5 = [...$arr1, ...$arr1]; //[1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3]

function getArr() {
  return ['a', 'b'];
}
$arr6 = [...getArr(), 'c']; //['a', 'b', 'c']

$arr7 = [...new ArrayIterator(['a', 'b', 'c'])]; //['a', 'b', 'c']

function arrGen() {
    for($i = 11; $i < 15; $i++) {
        yield $i;
    }
}
$arr8 = [...arrGen()]; //[11, 12, 13, 14]

It works like in JavaScript ES6.

See more on https://wiki.php.net/rfc/spread_operator_for_array.

5
  • 1
    This is not applicable to the question. The OP has string keys for the array (That doesn"t work with the spread operator) and the OP wants to preserve the keys (the spread operator throws away the keys). Also OP doesn't want duplicates.
    – martti
    Mar 14, 2020 at 19:54
  • Oh I see your points. That's true, and you're right. Can you provide some code to help us improve my answer for other people? I'd appreciate your time! Thank you very much for pointing out the drawbacks of my answer. Mar 15, 2020 at 20:12
  • 1
    I don't think the spread operator is the way to go here. Instead use the given answer $array1 + $array2
    – martti
    Mar 16, 2020 at 21:11
  • I wasn't aware of this! I mean, I didn't know that we can do $ouput = $array1 + $array2. Now I have learned something new! Thank you! Mar 17, 2020 at 17:10
  • Any answer on this page that implements an approach with the spread operator is inappropriate/incorrect and should have been posted on a different page of Stack Overflow. This page very clearly asked about merging two arrays with numeric associative keys which must be preserved in the result. Mar 16, 2023 at 21:17
0

https://www.php.net/manual/en/function.array-merge.php

<?php
$array1 = array("color" => "red", 2, 4);
$array2 = array("a", "b", "color" => "green", "shape" => "trapezoid", 4);
$result = array_merge($array1, $array2);
print_r($result);
?>
0

This is slightly explored by @jchook in one of his comments, but it is worth highlighting that the + is not as consistant as one might expect. When you are dealing with keys which are the same, the results are not the same as array_merge.

$a1 = array(
    'hello',
    'world',
);

$a2 = array(
    'foo',
    'baz',
);

// Will NOT work - only outputs $a1
print'<pre>';print_r($a1 + $a2);print'</pre>';

$a1 = array(
    'a' => 'hello',
    'b' => 'world',
);

$a2 = array(
    'c' => 'foo',
    'd' => 'baz',
);

// Will work (however were a and b c and d - would equally fail
print'<pre>';print_r($a1 + $a2);print'</pre>';

$a1 = array(
    1=> 'hello',
    2=> 'world',
);

$a2 = array(
    3=>'foo',
    4=>'baz',
);

// Will work
print'<pre>';print_r($a1 + $a2);print'</pre>';
1
-2

We can combine two arrays in PHP using the spread operator (...).

In this example, $array1 contains the values 1 through 10, and $array2 contains the values 11 through 20. The spread operator is used to concatenate(combine) the two arrays into a single array called $data.

// Define the first array
$array1 = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10];

// Define the second array
$array2 = [11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20];

// Use the spread operator to concatenate the two arrays into a single array
$data = [...$array1, ...$array2];

// Print the contents of the combined array
print_r($data);

2
  • 1
    This answer is a duplicate of several others, but worse because it doesn't contain an explanation.
    – cyberbrain
    Feb 16, 2023 at 19:26
  • Any answer on this page that implements an approach with the spread operator is inappropriate/incorrect and should have been posted on a different page of Stack Overflow. This page very clearly asked about merging two arrays with numeric associative keys which must be preserved in the result. Mar 16, 2023 at 21:19

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