115

I have a script file which I need to modify with another script to insert a text at the 8th line.

String to insert: Project_Name=sowstest, into a file called start.

I tried to use awk and sed, but my command is getting garbled.

190
sed -i '8i8 This is Line 8' FILE

inserts at line 8

8 This is Line 8

into file FILE

-i does the modification directly to file FILE, no output to stdout, as mentioned in the comments by glenn jackman.

  • 3
    i got the error -i is invalid option – ashok Jul 5 '11 at 20:59
  • 3
    Yes, the -i switch is specific for GNU-sed. – user unknown Dec 21 '12 at 6:39
  • 7
    mac users: with homebrew, brew install gnu-sed and then use this with gsed – cwd Jan 10 '15 at 17:58
  • 3
    This is super useful! Is there anyway for me to insert spaces at the beginning of the line? I noticed sed is not paying attention to initial whitespace... – elju Feb 1 '16 at 15:59
  • 6
    @elju: Yes, mask it with a backslash: sed '8i\ 8 This is Line 8' FILE. – user unknown Feb 2 '16 at 1:45
26

An ed answer

ed file << END
8i
Project_Name=sowstest
.
w
q
END

. on its own line ends input mode; w writes; q quits. GNU ed has a wq command to save and quit, but old ed's don't.

Further reading: https://gnu.org/software/ed/manual/ed_manual.html

15

the awk answer

awk -v n=8 -v s="Project_Name=sowstest" 'NR == n {print s} {print}' file > file.new
  • @glenn jackman I need to enter #define SERVER@"http://10.35.42.54/ms0.8" to a particular line. How can I achieve this? – Nevin Raj Victor May 20 '15 at 11:52
  • 1
    I think Nevin just needs to escape the quotes in his string with backslashes – Chris Koknat Sep 10 '15 at 23:49
  • @glenn jackman can you please explain the code? – waLL e Nov 22 '18 at 16:00
  • @waLLe, start with the awk info page which has a nice description of how awk works. Here, I have 2 "condition {action}" pairs, the 2nd has no condition which means the action is performed for every record. After you finish reading and you still have questions, let me know. – glenn jackman Nov 22 '18 at 18:11
  • @glennjackman almost there.. just didn't get this: file > file.new – waLL e Nov 24 '18 at 3:47
14

POSIX sed (and for example OS X's sed, the sed below) require i to be followed by a backslash and a newline. Also at least OS X's sed does not include a newline after the inserted text:

$ seq 3|gsed '2i1.5'
1
1.5
2
3
$ seq 3|sed '2i1.5'
sed: 1: "2i1.5": command i expects \ followed by text
$ seq 3|sed $'2i\\\n1.5'
1
1.52
3
$ seq 3|sed $'2i\\\n1.5\n'
1
1.5
2
3

To replace a line, you can use the c (change) or s (substitute) commands with a numeric address:

$ seq 3|sed $'2c\\\n1.5\n'
1
1.5
3
$ seq 3|gsed '2c1.5'
1
1.5
3
$ seq 3|sed '2s/.*/1.5/'
1
1.5
3

Alternatives using awk:

$ seq 3|awk 'NR==2{print 1.5}1'
1
1.5
2
3
$ seq 3|awk '{print NR==2?1.5:$0}'
1
1.5
3

awk interprets backslashes in variables passed with -v but not in variables passed using ENVIRON:

$ seq 3|awk -v v='a\ba' '{print NR==2?v:$0}'
1
a
3
$ seq 3|v='a\ba' awk '{print NR==2?ENVIRON["v"]:$0}'
1
a\ba
3

Both ENVIRON and -v are defined by POSIX.

11

OS X / macOS sed

The -i flag works differently on macOS sed than in GNU sed.

Here's the way to use it on macOS / OS X:

sed -i '' '8i\
8 This is Line 8' FILE

See man 1 sed for more info.

5

For those who are on SunOS which is non-GNU, the following code will help:

sed '1i\^J
line to add' test.dat > tmp.dat
  • ^J is inserted with ^V+^J
  • Add the newline after '1i.
  • \ MUST be the last character of the line.
  • The second part of the command must be in a second line.
5

Perl solutions:

quick and dirty:

perl -lpe 'print "Project_Name=sowstest" if $. == 8' file

  • -l strips newlines and adds them back in, eliminating the need for "\n"
  • -p loops over the input file, printing every line
  • -e executes the code in single quotes

$. is the line number

equivalent to @glenn's awk solution, using named arguments:

perl -slpe 'print $s if $. == $n' -- -n=8 -s="Project_Name=sowstest" file

  • -s enables a rudimentary argument parser
  • -- prevents -n and -s from being parsed by the standard perl argument parser

positional command arguments:

perl -lpe 'BEGIN{$n=shift; $s=shift}; print $s if $. == $n' 8 "Project_Name=sowstest" file

environment variables:

setenv n 8 ; setenv s "Project_Name=sowstest"
echo $n ; echo $s
perl -slpe 'print $ENV{s} if $. == $ENV{n}' file

ENV is the hash which contains all environment variables

Getopt to parse arguments into hash %o:

perl -MGetopt::Std -lpe 'BEGIN{getopt("ns",\%o)}; print $o{s} if $. == $o{n}' -- -n 8 -s "Project_Name=sowstest" file

Getopt::Long and longer option names

perl -MGetopt::Long -lpe 'BEGIN{GetOptions(\%o,"line=i","string=s")}; print $o{string} if $. == $o{line}' -- --line 8 --string "Project_Name=sowstest" file

Getopt is the recommended standard-library solution.
This may be overkill for one-line perl scripts, but it can be done

  • 2
    Kudos to you Chris for taking the time to explain all that and lay it out so nicely, but wow this is why I don't like perl. – rsaw Mar 5 '16 at 0:22
  • 1
    This answer deserves more upvotes – Igor Chubin Mar 3 '18 at 10:46
1

sed -e '8iProject_Name=sowstest' -i start using GNU sed

Sample run:

[root@node23 ~]# for ((i=1; i<=10; i++)); do echo "Line #$i"; done > a_file
[root@node23 ~]# cat a_file
Line #1
Line #2
Line #3
Line #4
Line #5
Line #6
Line #7
Line #8
Line #9
Line #10
[root@node23 ~]# sed -e '3ixxx inserted line xxx' -i a_file 
[root@node23 ~]# cat -An a_file 
     1  Line #1$
     2  Line #2$
     3  xxx inserted line xxx$
     4  Line #3$
     5  Line #4$
     6  Line #5$
     7  Line #6$
     8  Line #7$
     9  Line #8$
    10  Line #9$
    11  Line #10$
[root@node23 ~]# 
[root@node23 ~]# sed -e '5ixxx (inserted) "line" xxx' -i a_file
[root@node23 ~]# cat -n a_file 
     1  Line #1
     2  Line #2
     3  xxx inserted line xxx
     4  Line #3
     5  xxx (inserted) "line" xxx
     6  Line #4
     7  Line #5
     8  Line #6
     9  Line #7
    10  Line #8
    11  Line #9
    12  Line #10
[root@node23 ~]# 
  • Where is the trailing $ coming from on line 3 after the insertion? – jww Oct 25 '17 at 19:04
  • It's from -A flag to cat :) – jno Oct 27 '17 at 11:00
  • what if the string you want to insert contains quote marks, parentheses etc? – Anentropic May 30 '18 at 17:33
  • See update to the text above. That means, you will have to escape those chars as appropriate. – jno May 31 '18 at 12:42

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