9

I have a T-SQL statement that I am running against a table with many rows. I am seeing some strange behavior. Comparing a DateTime column against a precalculated value is slower than comparing each row against a calculation based on the GETDATE() function.

The following SQL takes 8 secs:

SET TRANSACTION ISOLATION LEVEL READ UNCOMMITTED
GO
DECLARE @TimeZoneOffset int = -(DATEPART("HH", GETUTCDATE() - GETDATE()))
DECLARE @LowerTime DATETIME = DATEADD("HH", ABS(@TimeZoneOffset), CONVERT(VARCHAR, GETDATE(), 101) + ' 17:00:00')
SELECT TOP 200 Id, EventDate, Message 
FROM Events WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE EventDate > @LowerTime
GO

This alternate strangely returns instantly:

SET TRANSACTION ISOLATION LEVEL READ UNCOMMITTED
GO
SELECT TOP 200 Id, EventDate, Message 
FROM Events WITH (NOLOCK)
WHERE EventDate > GETDATE()-1
GO

Why is the second query so much faster?

EDITED: I updated the SQL to accurately reflect other settings I am using

  • 2
    Have you checked the execution plans? # of records returned? – Joel Coehoorn Jul 1 '11 at 3:20
  • 1
    Is there an index on the EventDate column? Did you look at the query plans of the two queries? – Aaron Bertrand Jul 1 '11 at 3:21
  • 3
    Doesn't make any difference here. I can't see any reason why it should either. GETDATE is only evaluated once per query so once the query has started it behaves just the same as @LowerTime. In your example GETDATE AND @LowerTime are not the same value. Do they both return the same number of rows? – David Steele Jul 1 '11 at 3:33
  • 1
    What is the type of the EventDate column? – Jon Seigel Jul 1 '11 at 3:35
  • 1
    TOP with no ORDER BY isn't a correct query, hence is not a correct test – gbn Jul 1 '11 at 8:19
10

After doing a lot of reading and researching, I've discovered the issue here is parameter sniffing. Sql Server attempts to determine how best to use indexes based on the where clause, but in this case it isnt doing a very good job.

See the examples below :

Slow version:

declare @dNow DateTime  
Select @dNow=GetDate()  
Select *  
From response_master_Incident rmi  
Where rmi.response_date between DateAdd(hh,-2,@dNow) AND @dNow  

Fast version:

Select *  
From response_master_Incident rmi  
Where rmi.response_date between DateAdd(hh,-2,GetDate()) AND GetDate()  

The "Fast" version runs around 10x faster than the slow version. The Response_Date field is indexed and is a DateTime type.

The solution is to tell Sql Server how best to optimise the query. Modifying the example as follows to include the OPTIMIZE option resulted in it using the same execution plan as the "Fast Version". The OPTMIZE option here explicitly tells sql server to treat the local @dNow variable as a date (as if declaring it as DateTime wasnt enough :s )

Care should be taken when doing this however because in more complicated WHERE clauses you could end up making the query perform worse than Sql Server's own optimisations.

declare @dNow DateTime

SET @dNow=GetDate()

Select ID, response_date, call_back_phone 
from response_master_Incident rmi
where rmi.response_date between DateAdd(hh,-2,@dNow) AND @dNow

-- The optimizer does not know too much about the variable so assumes to should perform a clusterd index scann (on the clustered index ID) - this is slow

-- This hint tells the optimzer that the variable is indeed a datetime in this format (why it does not know that already who knows)
OPTION(OPTIMIZE FOR (@dNow = '99991231'));
  • +1 this is very interesting, any idea what all this means for the execution plans? Also, does it mean the getdate version is calculating an execution plan each time – eglasius Feb 5 '12 at 4:24
0

The execution plans must be different, because SQL Server does not evaluate the value of the variable when creating the execution plan in execution time. So, it uses average statistics from all the different dates that can be stored in the table.

On the other hand, the function getdate is evaluated in execution time, so the execution plan is created using statistics for that specific date, which of course, are more realistic that the previous ones.

If you create a stored procedure with @LowerTime as a parameter, you will get better results.

  • You are correct that I was not running this code in a stored procedure but rather interactively in SSMS. This sounds feasible to me. – jedatu Jul 14 '11 at 4:33

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