10

Apparently $pid is out of scope here. Shouldn't it be "closed" in with the function? I'm fairly sure that is how closures work in javascript for example.

According to some articles php closures are broken, so I cannot access this?

So how can $pid be accessed from this closure function?

class MyClass {
  static function getHdvdsCol($pid) {
    $col = new PointColumn();
    $col->key = $pid;
    $col->parser = function($row) {
        print $pid; // Undefined variable: pid
    };
    return $col;
  }
}

$func = MyClass::getHdvdsCol(45);
call_user_func($func, $row);

Edit I have gotten around it with use: $col->parser = function($row) use($pid). However I feel this is ugly.

5
  • 4
    It is not ugly, it is how closures work in php
    – zerkms
    Jul 1 '11 at 3:56
  • that's just how it is in php so..
    – tradyblix
    Jul 1 '11 at 3:57
  • It's an ugly language, but I'm stuck with it. :(
    – Keyo
    Jul 1 '11 at 4:00
  • It becomes less and less ugly every day. (:
    – rsk82
    Aug 7 '11 at 6:09
  • 1
    From PHP 5.4 you can access $this within the closure.
    – jgivoni
    Jun 28 '12 at 21:41
25

You need to specify which variables should be closed in this way:

function($row) use ($pid) { ... }
4
  • If this closure is saved in a variable and then passed to another scope where $pid does not exist, will pid be wrapped in the closure somehow, or not accessible? Feb 26 '13 at 0:15
  • @Josh Nankin: actually use($var,...) is how closures are implemented in php. So if you pass the anonymous function to another variable scope - the $pid variable will contain the last defined value.
    – zerkms
    Feb 26 '13 at 0:18
  • 1
    Does this "use" thingy feel just weird or is it just me? I just can't get over it after using closures in other languages. :/ Oct 11 '13 at 21:19
  • 6
    @Matjaz Muhic: yep, it's weird for everyone not just you
    – zerkms
    Oct 11 '13 at 21:32
0

You can use the bindTo method.

class MyClass {
  static function getHdvdsCol($pid) {
    $col = new PointColumn();
    $col->key = $pid;
    $parser = function($row) {
        print $this->key;
    };
    $col->parser = $parser->bindTo($parser, $parser);
    return $col;
  }
}

$func = MyClass::getHdvdsCol(45);
call_user_func($func, $row);
-4

I think PHP is very consistent in scoping of variables. The rule is, if a variable is defined outside a function, you must specify it explicitly. For lexical scope 'use' is used, for globals 'global' is used.

For example, you can't also use a global variable directly:

$n = 5;

function f()
{
    echo $n; // Undefined variable
}

You must use the global keyword:

$n = 5;

function f()
{
    global $n;
    echo $n;
}

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