16

I have migrated my Dart code to NNBD / Null Safety. Some of it looks like this:

class Foo {
  String? _a;
  void foo() {
    if (_a != null) {
      _a += 'a';
    }
  }
}

class Bar {
  Bar() {
    _a = 'a';
  }
  String _a;
}

This causes two analysis errors. For _a += 'a';:

An expression whose value can be 'null' must be null-checked before it can be dereferenced. Try checking that the value isn't 'null' before dereferencing it.

For Bar() {:

Non-nullable instance field '_a' must be initialized. Try adding an initializer expression, or add a field initializer in this constructor, or mark it 'late'.

In both cases I have already done exactly what the error suggests! What's up with that?

I'm using Dart 2.12.0-133.2.beta (Tue Dec 15).

Edit: I found this page which says:

The analyzer can’t model the flow of your whole application, so it can’t predict the values of global variables or class fields.

But that doesn't make sense to me - there's only one possible flow control path from if (_a != null) to _a += 'a'; in this case - there's no async code and Dart is single-threaded - so it doesn't matter that _a isn't local.

And the error message for Bar() explicitly states the possibility of initialising the field in the constructor.

0

4 Answers 4

25

The problem is that class fields can be overridden even if it is marked as final. The following example illustrates the problem:

class A {
  final String? text = 'hello';

  String? getText() {
    if (text != null) {
      return text;
    } else {
      return 'WAS NULL!';
    }
  }
}

class B extends A {
  bool first = true;

  @override
  String? get text {
    if (first) {
      first = false;
      return 'world';
    } else {
      return null;
    }
  }
}

void main() {
  print(A().getText()); // hello
  print(B().getText()); // null
}

The B class overrides the text final field so it returns a value the first time it is asked but returns null after this. You cannot write your A class in such a way that you can prevent this form of overrides from being allowed.

So we cannot change the return value of getText from String? to String even if it looks like we checks the text field for null before returning it.

13
  • 11
    It seems odd to me that a fairly esoteric use case like overriding final in a sub-class, is now putting a big giant wart in NNBD implementations. Flutter layouts will be full of ! each one creating a potential bug down the road, because the alternative is just too verbose.
    – shawnblais
    Commented Mar 10, 2021 at 1:44
  • 3
    @shawnblais Or create a local reference to the member value.
    – jamesdlin
    Commented Mar 10, 2021 at 22:27
  • 4
    Thanks @jamesdlin I believe that is actually the only safe way to work with this. But I think most devs will just use the ! operator, which then basically kills any advantage of NNBD for that var, and creates brittle methods that could easily be broken in the future. eg; if(index == null) return; index = index! + 1; If someone later removes this null check, the compiler says nothing, and a grenade is sitting just there. In this example that looks a little silly, but on methods longer than a few lines, this is a significant issue, those ! operators do not exactly jump out at the reader.
    – shawnblais
    Commented Mar 11, 2021 at 21:28
  • 2
    @Adnan Exactly. The purpose of getter/setter methods is that they are not distinguish from a normal variable. In a sense, a final variable is a field with just a getter while a var variable both have a setter and getter. This also means that we can always override a variable with a new e.g. getter like my example which is the core of this issue. (but this is also the reason why we don't create getSomethig() and setSomehing() methods like Java because we can always introduce logic to an existing field if we need it without the need of changing the API. Commented May 15, 2021 at 7:48
  • 2
    @Adnan In Java, it is standard practice to very rarely make class variables public. Instead we define getVariable() and setVariable() to get and set a private variable. The reason is that Java does not have the concept of getter/setter methods (like Dart or C#) so if we later want to introduce e.g. validation of a field, we cannot do that, without changing the API, unless we from the start have used a method to access the variable. Commented May 15, 2021 at 8:14
1

An expression whose value can be 'null' must be null-checked before it can be dereferenced. Try checking that the value isn't 'null' before dereferencing it.

It seems like this really does only work for local variables. This code has no errors:

class Foo {
  String? _a;
  void foo() {
    final a = _a;
    if (a != null) {
      a += 'a';
      _a = a;
    }
  }
}

It kind of sucks though. My code is now filled with code that just copies class members to local variables and back again. :-/

Non-nullable instance field '_a' must be initialized. Try adding an initializer expression, or add a field initializer in this constructor, or mark it 'late'.

Ah so it turns out a "field initializer" is actually like this:

class Bar {
  Bar() : _a = 'a';
  String _a;
}
1

There are few ways to deal with this situation. I've given a detailed answer here so I'm only writing the solutions from it:

  • Use local variable (Recommended)

    void foo() {
      var a = this.a; // <-- Local variable
      if (a != null) {
        a += 'a';
        this.a = a;
      }
    }
    
  • Use ??

    void foo() {
      var a = (this.a ?? '') + 'a';
      this.a = a;
    }
    
  • Use Bang operator (!)

    You should only use this solution when you're 100% sure that the variable (a) is not null at the time you're using it.

    void foo() {
      a = a! + 'a'; // <-- Bang operator
    }
    

To answer your second question:

Non-nullable fields should always be initialized. There are generally three ways of initializing them:

  • In the declaration:

    class Bar {
      String a = 'a';
    }
    
  • In the initializing formal

    class Bar {
      String a;
    
      Bar({required this.a});
    }
    
  • In the initializer list:

    class Bar {
      String a;
    
      Bar(String b) : a = b;
    }
    
-2

You can create your classes in null-safety like this

    class JobDoc {
  File? docCam1;
  File? docCam2;
  File? docBarcode;
  File? docSignature;

  JobDoc({this.docCam1, this.docCam2, this.docBarcode, this.docSignature});

  JobDoc.fromJson(Map<String, dynamic> json) {
    docCam1 = json['docCam1'] ?? null;
    docCam2 = json['docCam2'] ?? null;
    docBarcode = json['docBarcode'] ?? null;
    docSignature = json['docSignature'] ?? null;
  }
}

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