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For the below code:

int digsum(ll num) {  //function to calculate sum of digits
    if (num < 0)
        num = abs(num);
    int ans = 0;
    while (num != 0) {
        ans = ans + num % 10;
        num = num / 10;
    }
    return ans;
}

int main() {
    ios_base::sync_with_stdio(0); cin.tie(0);

    int a, b, c, cnt = 0;
    long long x;
    cin >> a >> b >> c;

    for (int i = 0; i <= 72; i++) {
        x = (b * (pow(i, a))) + c;
        if (i == digsum(x) && x < mod) {
            cout << x << " ";
        }
    }

    return 0;
}

In the case a,b,c = 3,2,8 respectively and i=19; pow(19,3) is supposed to calculate 19^3 but when I replace pow by (19x19x19), this specific case is getting satisfied, where as that wasn't the case with the pow function. Can someone explain what the problem is?

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  • What type is ll ? And what is the value for mod ?
    – selbie
    Dec 29, 2020 at 5:36
  • Also, what value did you expect to have computed ? And what you actually getting?
    – selbie
    Dec 29, 2020 at 5:39
  • ll is long long and mod is 10^9 -1@selbie
    – sidb2k
    Dec 29, 2020 at 5:45
  • 2
    When I run your program and enter 3 2 8, it spits out 10 2008 13726. What values did you expect it to print?
    – selbie
    Dec 29, 2020 at 5:53
  • but im not getting 13726 in the output, for some reason it is calculating x as 13725 for that case
    – sidb2k
    Dec 29, 2020 at 6:08

1 Answer 1

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My psychic powers suggest that your standard library's implementation of pow is not precise. I recall a discussion on SO a while back on this topic. Remember, pow returns a floating point value. I can't repro it, but it's entirely possibly your invocation of pow(19,3) returns 6858.999999999 or similar due to the way it's optimized.

Indeed, this this page says as much:

Due to rounding errors in floating point numbers, the results of pow() may not be precise (even if you pass it integers or whole numbers).

Also, this question and answer suggests the same thing.

I wouldn't have suspected it, but there you go.

Consider doing this as a workaround:

long long power = nearbyint(pow(i,a));
x = b * power + c;
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  • but if pow returned a float and rounding off was the problem, printing d where float d = pow(19, 3); should display a floating point value, but that isn't the case; it justs displays 6859
    – sidb2k
    Dec 29, 2020 at 6:57
  • Because print functions round too.
    – selbie
    Dec 29, 2020 at 7:09
  • what if I print using cout<<(float)d;
    – sidb2k
    Dec 29, 2020 at 7:13
  • That's won't do anything different. But this will: cout << std::setprecision(32) << modified;
    – selbie
    Dec 29, 2020 at 7:47

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