Given a particular date, say 2011-07-02, how can I find the date of the next Monday (or any weekday day for that matter) after that date?

10 Answers 10

up vote 83 down vote accepted
import datetime
def next_weekday(d, weekday):
    days_ahead = weekday - d.weekday()
    if days_ahead <= 0: # Target day already happened this week
        days_ahead += 7
    return d + datetime.timedelta(days_ahead)

d = datetime.date(2011, 7, 2)
next_monday = next_weekday(d, 0) # 0 = Monday, 1=Tuesday, 2=Wednesday...
print(next_monday)
  • 6
    You could also do ((day - today) + 7) % 7 to get the day diff – jstaab Jul 30 '14 at 18:31
  • 3
    I think that just (day - today) % 7 should do the trick – bsa Jul 31 '17 at 14:49

Here's a succinct and generic alternative to the slightly weighty answers above.

# Returns the date of the next given weekday after
# the given date. For example, the date of next Monday.
onDay = lambda date, day: date + datetime.timedelta(days=(day-date.weekday()+7)%7)
  • This answer arrived too late to gather upvotes, but it's my favorite. – ASalazar Jan 21 '17 at 1:14
  • 2
    Extremely clean, you have my vote. – Liquidgenius Sep 28 '17 at 21:08

Try

>>> dt = datetime(2011, 7, 2)
>>> dt + timedelta(days=(7 - dt.weekday()))
datetime.datetime(2011, 7, 4, 0, 0)

using, that the next monday is 7 days after the a monday, 6 days after a tuesday, and so on, and also using, that Python's datetime type reports monday as 0, ..., sunday as 6.

  • Interesting that - when I try to find the upcoming Sunday after datetime(2013, 1, 1) with "datetime(2013, 1, 1) + timedelta(days=(7 - datetime(2013, 1, 1).weekday()))", I get "datetime.datetime(2013, 1, 7, 0, 0)", which is a Monday. – fixxxer Jun 11 '13 at 14:28
  • @fixxxer - As it says in the answer: the code uses a few properties of the datetime API in ways, which will only work, if you are looking for mondays. The code provided by phihag is more general and can find any upcoming day-of-week. – Dirk Jun 11 '13 at 15:35
  • Do you think using 6 instead of 7 in timedelta will help ? – fixxxer Jun 12 '13 at 8:25
  • @fixxxer: Why don't you simply use the code provided by phihag? It can do what you want: next_weekday(datetime.date(2013,1,1), 6) is datetime.date(2013, 1, 6), a sunday. My code is "cute" in (ab)using certain properties of python's datetime API and answers only the "find the next monday" part of the question, but not general enough to answer the "find the next xxxday" question. – Dirk Jun 12 '13 at 9:32
  • @fixxxer: to find the next Sunday using "cute" code: d + timedelta(6 - d.weekday() or 13 - d.weekday()) (it is equivalent to phihag's code if Sunday == 6 is the last day of the week) – jfs Oct 7 '15 at 17:24

You can start adding one day to date object and stop when it's monday.

>>> d = datetime.date(2011, 7, 2)
>>> while d.weekday() != 0: #0 for monday
...     d += datetime.timedelta(days=1)
... 
>>> d
datetime.date(2011, 7, 4)

This is example of calculations within ring mod 7.

import datetime


def next_day(given_date, weekday):
    day_shift = (weekday - given_date.weekday()) % 7
    return given_date + datetime.timedelta(days=day_shift)

now = datetime.date(2018, 4, 15) # sunday
names = ['monday', 'tuesday', 'wednesday', 'thursday', 'friday',    
         'saturday', 'sunday']
for weekday in range(7):
    print(names[weekday], next_day(now, weekday))

will print:

monday 2018-04-16
tuesday 2018-04-17
wednesday 2018-04-18
thursday 2018-04-19
friday 2018-04-20
saturday 2018-04-21
sunday 2018-04-15

As you see it's correctly give you next monday, tuesday, wednesday, thursday friday and saturday. And it also understood that 2018-04-15 is a sunday and returned current sunday instead of next one.

I'm sure you'll find this answer extremely helpful after 7 years ;-)

Another simple elegant solution is to use pandas offsets.
I find it very helpful and robust when playing with dates.
- If you want the first Sunday just modify the frequency to freq='W-SUN'.
- If you want a couple of next Sundays, change the offsets.Day(days).
- Using pandas offsets allow you to ignore holidays, work only with Business Days and more.
You can also apply this method easily on a whole DataFrame using apply method.

# Getting the closest monday from a given date
closest_monday = pd.date_range(start=date, end=date + offsets.Day(6), freq='W-MON')[0]

# Adding a 'ClosestMonday' column with the closest monday for each row in a pandas df using apply
# Require you to have a 'Date' column in your df
def get_closest_monday(row):
    return pd.date_range(start=row.Date, end=row.Date + offsets.Day(6), freq='W-MON')[0]

df['ClosestMonday'] = df.apply(lambda row: get_closest_monday(row), axis=1)
import datetime

d = datetime.date(2011, 7, 2)
while d.weekday() != 0:
    d += datetime.timedelta(1)
weekday = 0 ## Monday
dt = datetime.datetime.now().replace(hour=0, minute=0, second=0) ## or any specific date
days_remaining = (weekday - dt.weekday() - 1) % 7 + 1
next_dt = dt + datetime.timedelta(days_remaining)

via list comprehension?

from datetime import *
[datetime.today()+timedelta(days=x) for x in range(0,7) if (datetime.today()+timedelta(days=x)).weekday() % 7 == 0]

(0 at the end is for next monday, returns current date when run on monday)

This will give the first next Monday after given date:

import datetime

def get_next_monday(year, month, day):
    date0 = datetime.date(year, month, day)
    next_monday = date0 + datetime.timedelta(7 - date0.weekday() or 7)
    return next_monday

print get_next_monday(2011, 7, 2)
print get_next_monday(2015, 8, 31)
print get_next_monday(2015, 9, 1)

2011-07-04
2015-09-07
2015-09-07

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