9

I'm using a 2 python class as configuration file. One of them contain old parameters (deprecated) and I would like to display a message if a deprecated param is used.

Here is how I used the different class:

config_backup.py

class _ConfigBackup:
    PARAM1 = 'a'
    PARAM2 = 'b'

config_new.py

class Config(_ConfigBackup):
    PARAM3 = 'c'
    PARAM4 = 'd'

cfg = Config

Then I can call cfg and have result like this:

>>> cfg.PARAM3
'c'
>>> cfg.PARAM1
Parameter PARAM1 is deprecated.
'a'

The function or method would look like this I think:

def warning(param):
    print(f"Parameter {param.__name__} is deprecated.")
    return param

I am not exactly sure if this is possible, maybe by using decorator or with statement, any idea ?

5
  • Look at the @property decorator.
    – BoarGules
    Jan 7, 2021 at 15:15
  • Thanks @BoarGules for your answer ! Correct me if I'm wrong but I will need to create one function (with @property decorator) for each param ? Because, for my current task I have more than 150 params, and I know I could create it automatically but I'm sure there is prettier solution !
    – Yohann L.
    Jan 7, 2021 at 15:21
  • 3
    I would strongly recommend against using a Python class (which can contain arbitrary Python code) as a configuration file. argparse supports reading options from a file, and you could use configparser, json, or a YAML parser to parse an appropriate configuration file.
    – chepner
    Jan 7, 2021 at 15:31
  • By the way, although it's not related to your main question of how to do something when a variable is accessed (note: not called), I'd suggest using a DeprecationWarning instead of just printing. See the warnings module in the standard library for more info.
    – David Z
    Jan 8, 2021 at 3:18
  • Yes of course @DavidZ, but I wanted the question to be more general, with the accepted answer we can do more than just printing a message
    – Yohann L.
    Jan 8, 2021 at 10:53

5 Answers 5

7

One method you could use with the @property decorator

class Config(_ConfigBackup):
    PARAM3 = 'c'
    PARAM4 = 'd'
    __PARAM1 = _ConfigBackup.PARAM1

    @property
    def PARAM1(self):
        print(f"Parameter PARAM1 is deprecated.")
        return Config.__PARAM1

cfg = Config()

print(cfg.PARAM1)
print(cfg.PARAM2)
print(cfg.PARAM3)
print(cfg.PARAM4)

Output:

Parameter PARAM1 is deprecated.
a
b
c
d

EDIT:

Another option is modifying __getattribute__:

class Config(_ConfigBackup):
    PARAM3 = 'c'
    PARAM4 = 'd'

    DEPRECATED = ['PARAM1', 'PARAM2']

    def __getattribute__(self, item):
        if not item == 'DEPRECATED' and item in Config.DEPRECATED:
            print(f"Parameter {item} is deprecated.")
            return object.__getattribute__(self,item)
3
  • Thanks for the answer but as already said in the comment, this is a working solution but not quite easy to apply with tons of params
    – Yohann L.
    Jan 7, 2021 at 15:28
  • @YohannL. You could create a list of all deprecated params and use __getattribute__? (See edit) Jan 7, 2021 at 15:40
  • 1
    You can also use the warnings module, from warnings import warn
    – Aven Desta
    Jan 7, 2021 at 15:42
3

Here is a proof-of-concept solution that meets the objection of having too many properties to be workable.

class Config:
    def __init__(self):
        self.deprecated = {'PARAM1': 'a', 'PARAM2': 'b'}
        self.nondeprecated = {'PARAM3': 'c', 'PARAM4': 'd'}
    def __getattr__(self, parmname):
        if parmname in self.__dict__["deprecated"]:
            print(f"{parmname} is deprecated")
            return self.__dict__["deprecated"][parmname]
        return self.__dict__["nondeprecated"][parmname]

>>> c = Config()
>>> c.PARAM1
PARAM1 is deprecated
'a'
>>> c.PARAM2
PARAM2 is deprecated
'b'
>>> c.PARAM3
'c'

I didn't put the deprecated parameters in a separate class because that would complicate the example unnecessarily. And real-world code would need to be able to cope with attempts to name a nonexistent parameter, and not do this:

>>> c.PARAM5
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#105>", line 1, in <module>
    c.PARAM5
  File "<pyshell#100>", line 9, in __getattr__
    return self.__dict__["nondeprecated"][parmname]
KeyError: 'PARAM5'
1
  • Great ! This solution might work perfectly for my case, using self.deprecated = _ConfigBackup.__dict__ is even better for me
    – Yohann L.
    Jan 7, 2021 at 15:49
1

When you use a value you are not allowed to really execute something unless you are using the property function.

for example in the code below we use the property to make it dynamically produced when a function tries to get it

class _ConfigBackup:
    _PARAM1 = 'a'
    
    @property
    def PARAM1(self):  # This method is get method in which the user tries to get its value
        print("Parameter PARAM1 is depreciated")
        return self._PARAM1

    # You can also make a setter by
    @PARAM1.setter
    def PARAM1(self, value_to_set):
        self._PARAM1 = value_to_set

    PARAM2 = 'b'

in the above code you require a little bit of extra work but it works as you expect it to. You can use this function prepared by me to make a depreciated property

def depreciated(property_to_use: str):
    def internal_set_property(self, value):
        setattr(self, propert_to_use, value)
    def internal_get_property(self):
        print(f"Parameter {property_to_use} is Depreciated")
        return property(internal_set_property, internal_get_property, lambda self: None)


class _ConfigBackup:
    _PARAM1 = 'a'
    PARAM1 = depreciated('_PARAM1')
    
    _PARAM2 = 'b'
    PARAM2 = depreciated('_PARAM2')

See this for reference:

1

Something like this avoids the need to create the .deprecated dicts like in the accepted answer. Just add a __getattribute__() method to class Config:

class _ConfigBackup:
    PARAM1 = 'a'
    PARAM2 = 'b'
    
class Config(_ConfigBackup):
    PARAM3 = 'c'
    PARAM4 = 'd'
    
    def __getattribute__(self, name):
        if not name.startswith('__') and name in _ConfigBackup.__dict__:
            print(f"'{name}' is deprecated.")
        return object.__getattribute__(self, name)

Usage:

cfg = Config()
print(cfg.PARAM1, cfg.PARAM3)

Output:

'PARAM1' is deprecated.
a c
0

The accepted answer does the job is if you can put the variables in a dictionary. However, in my case I wanted to keep those class. It can be done using the same 2 config class and a class wrapping all deprecated param using _ConfigBackup.__dict__:

class _ConfigBackup(object):
    PARAM1 = 'a'
    PARAM1 = 'b'

class ConfigBackup:
    def __init__(self):
        self.deprecated = _ConfigBackup.__dict__

    def __getattr__(self, parmname):
        if parmname in self.__dict__["deprecated"]:
            print(f"{parmname} is deprecated")
            return self.__dict__["deprecated"][parmname]

class Config(ConfigBackup):
    PARAM3 = 'c'
    PARAM4 = 'd'

>>> cfg = Config()
>>> cfg.PARAM1
PARAM1 is deprecated
'a'
>>> cfg.PARAM3
'c'
2
  • What value does it add to have this answer as well as the accepted answer? I think your answer would be better if you can clarify that.
    – David Z
    Jan 8, 2021 at 3:16
  • Okay I update my answer, it is mainly because the accepted answer use only 1 class with param in dict, but we can do it by wrapping the class in a dict with __dict__
    – Yohann L.
    Jan 8, 2021 at 10:50

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