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I've been learning about sockets in Java to send information between two separate Java applications for a Minigame program I've been working on. The goal is to be able to have it so that Server A can tell Server B to do something by writing and reading ints in a switch statement. This is the code I have for the server-side socket:

@Override
public void run() {
    try (
            DataInputStream input = new DataInputStream(this.socket.getInputStream())
    ) {
        this.output = new DataOutputStream(this.socket.getOutputStream());
        while (!this.finished) {
            int type = input.readInt();
            this.plugin.getLogger().info("Type: " + type + " from " + this.socket.getRemoteSocketAddress());
            switch (type) {
                case 1: {
                    ServerManager.getInstance().addActiveServer(this.serverInfo, input.readInt());
                    break;
                }
                case 2: {
                    int length = input.readInt();
                    for (int i = 0; i < length; i++) {
                        UUID uuid = UUID.fromString(input.readUTF());
                        PlayerData playerData = PlayerManager.getInstance().getPlayerData(uuid);
                        if (playerData == null) {
                            continue;
                        }
                        playerData.setPlaying(false);
                        playerData.setSpectating(false);
                        playerData.setQueuing(false);
                        playerData.getPlayer().connect(this.plugin.getLobbyServer());
                    }
                    ServerManager.getInstance().addInactiveServer(this.serverInfo);
                    break;
                }
                case 3: {
                    int length = input.readInt();
                    for (int i = 0; i < length; i++) {
                        UUID uniqueId = UUID.fromString(input.readUTF());
                        PlayerData playerData = PlayerManager.getInstance().getPlayerData(uniqueId);
                        if (playerData == null) {
                            continue;
                        }
                        playerData.setQueuing(true);
                    }
                    break;
                }
                default:
            }
        }

        this.output.close();
        this.socket.close();
    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}

When the Minigame begins the countdown sequence, it writes and flushes '1' to the server-side socket before writing and flushing '3' when the Minigame actually starts.

// Tells Server A that the max players have been met
// and to start a countdown sequence for a Minigame.
public void sendStartUpdate(int gameKey) {
    try {
        this.output.writeInt(1);
        this.output.writeInt(gameKey);
        this.output.flush();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}
// Lets Server A know that the player is queued up for a Minigame
public void sendQueuingUpdate(@NotNull Collection<UUID> players) throws IOException {
    this.output.writeInt(3);
    this.output.writeInt(players.size());
    for (UUID player : players) {
        this.output.writeUTF(String.valueOf(player));
    }
    this.output.flush();
}

However, for some reason, whenever I run the program, the server first receives '1' and '3' as expected, but then receives a series of really long integers from Server B out of nowhere.

[02:45:24 INFO] Type: 1                     // This is good!
[02:45:27 INFO] Type: 3                     // This is good!
[02:45:43 INFO] Type: 16777216              // Huh??
[02:45:43 INFO] Type: 1280                  // WHAT???
[02:45:43 INFO] Type: 256                   // Insert confused guy meme here
[02:45:43 INFO] Type: 610548020
[02:45:43 INFO] Type: 1667643705
[02:45:43 INFO] Type: 925721650
[02:45:43 INFO] Type: 842018100
[02:45:43 INFO] Type: 878785581
[02:45:43 INFO] Type: 1647785059
[02:45:43 INFO] Type: 761477426
[02:45:43 INFO] Type: 825570148
[02:45:43 INFO] Type: 1647851062

This issue also happens when the Minigame ends and the program notifies Server A that the Minigame has ended. I didn't have this problem until I made a slight modification to the code below:

public void sendPlayingUpdate(@NotNull Collection<UUID> players) throws IOException {
    this.output.writeBoolean(true);
    this.output.writeBoolean(false);
    this.output.writeBoolean(false);
    this.output.writeInt(5);
    this.output.writeInt(players.size());
    for (UUID player : players) {
        this.output.writeUTF(String.valueOf(player));
    }
//  this.output.writeInt(4);
//  this.output.writeInt(players.size());
//  for (UUID uuid : players) {
//      this.output.writeUTF(String.valueOf(uuid));
//  }
    this.output.flush();
}

The commented-out bit is the original code. If I replace it with the uncommented code, it gives all those arbitrarily large integers. Is there a way for another application to somehow connect to the same port as the socket and begin feeding random information? I just don't see how one small minor change can lead to something like 1667643705 being sent, the integers honestly remind me of hashcodes.

I appreciate anything.

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  • 1
    Please provide an MCVE, i.e. a complete sample application running two servers we can copy, compile and run. Like Jeroen said, if you want an answer and not mere speculation, we need something to run and debug. Ideally, share it on GitHub, then you will get a solution for your problem in no time. – kriegaex Jan 15 at 5:28
  • @kriegaex The problem is, this is for a plugin I'm making for a Minecraft server, so I doubt that you'll be able to physically run the code unless you have the necessary servers set up... – Frank W Jan 15 at 6:52
  • Why not implement a minimal client + server pair in order to just test the socket communication. That is why I said MCVE and not your original application. Just enough to reproduce the problem. To me it seems as if you have full control over both the sending and receiving side of socket communication. – kriegaex Jan 15 at 6:58
  • Frank, why would you set up a bounty and then not provide feedback to those who are trying to help you? Isn't that a kind of waste? – kriegaex Jan 18 at 6:18
  • 2
    Well, running the program in your mind was part of the problem, which is exactly why I asked for an MCVE. Debugging the program running on a computer would have solved it. I am happy you solved your problem, if you feel good about not understanding why it actually occurred, meaning with the next change it could re-occur. I do wonder why you asked the question in the first place and put the bounty on it if you were not interested in a conclusive answer or unwilling to contribute to getting one. But OTOH, I do not need to understand everything in this world. 😉 – kriegaex Jan 19 at 1:08
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+50

The timestamps indicate a 16 second gap between the second and third packet. So it's likely not the second 3 packet that is corrupt. Somewhere else you are sending a malformed packet in code not presented.

The data is:

01 00 00 00  00 00 05 00  00 00 01 00  24 [... load of hex ...]

0x24 is $, but could be a string length from a writeUTF - say, the two UUIDs concatenated.

I would start off testing the parse code can interpret the output of the format code without all the server stuff. As a benefit, that will require factoring the code better.

2

Judging by your server-side code it seems that your protocol works as follows

  • Packet ID (int): 4 bytes
  • N bytes of packet-specific content

Your server-side code recognizes 3 different types of packets, and ignores all non-identified packets but does output their Packet ID.

The most likely scenario is that one of your packets isn't being parsed completely, so you have leftover data that it tries to parse as a new packet. I know this isn't a full answer but without your full program this is impossible for me to debug.

I would suggest creating a unit test for your packet handling logic, where you create a DataInputStream containing only a single packet. For each Packet, you check if it is handled correctly, and if you have any leftover data after processing. This should enable you to find the problem.

0

Bro in my opinion You may have something else running on the same port - check the CMD with netstat -ano, also in Task Manager is possibility to look on current connections. You may have multiple instances sending or listening on the same port or some other application using chosen port number - let's try changing port number and please tell us if something changed. And one more: If anyone use readUTF, the other side must use writeUTF !!!

1
  • Bro U use input.readInt() - this is wrong!!! Use readUTF !!! – SmilingMouse Jan 20 at 22:03

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