267

Without knowing the keys of a JavaScript Object, how can I turn something like...

var obj = {
   param1: 'something',
   param2: 'somethingelse',
   param3: 'another'
}

obj[param4] = 'yetanother';

...into...

var str = 'param1=something&param2=somethingelse&param3=another&param4=yetanother';

...?

12
  • 1
    Are you looking for a recursive solution? Jul 4, 2011 at 0:50
  • 1
    @Jared I added a recursive solution :)
    – alex
    Jul 4, 2011 at 1:17
  • @alex - Thanks; I like seeing the answers from the more experienced folk on the more complicated problems. :) Jul 4, 2011 at 1:20
  • 2
    @Jared You know, I never really think of myself as an experienced JavaScript developer. More like hack 'til it works guy :)
    – alex
    Jul 4, 2011 at 1:21
  • @alex - Oh yeah, me too. But how would what you put together compare to how I would have approached it? I'm constantly amazed. Jul 4, 2011 at 1:24

27 Answers 27

263

One line with no dependencies:

new URLSearchParams(obj).toString();
// OUT: param1=something&param2=somethingelse&param3=another&param4=yetanother

Use it with the URL builtin like so:

let obj = { param1: 'something', param2: 'somethingelse', param3: 'another' }
obj['param4'] = 'yetanother';
const url = new URL(`your_url.com`);
url.search = new URLSearchParams(obj);
const response = await fetch(url);

[Edit April 4, 2020]: null values will be interpreted as the string 'null'.

[Edit Mar 9, 2022]: browser compatibility

10
  • 28
    this is the best answer by a mile
    – hraban
    Sep 11, 2019 at 15:50
  • 1
    @HonsaStunna I've never thought about putting multidimensional objects on a URL parameter, usually use POST with JSON for that
    – jfunk
    Nov 7, 2019 at 18:12
  • 1
    Be careful with this one and null values.
    – Xaraxia
    Apr 3, 2020 at 1:15
  • 1
    You should check if your target browsers to suport URLSearchParams, e.g. IE11 does not: caniuse.com/?search=URLSearchParams
    – Peter T.
    Oct 28, 2020 at 7:13
  • 7
    will not work with nested objects
    – LaCodeM
    Nov 30, 2021 at 10:09
148

If you use jQuery, this is what it uses for parameterizing the options of a GET XHR request:

$.param( obj )

http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.param/

1
  • Most of the other ansers were no good for a nested object. This one does the trick. Thanks!
    – Julesezaar
    Aug 26, 2020 at 13:02
147

An elegant one: (assuming you are running a modern browser or node)

var str = Object.keys(obj).map(function(key) {
  return key + '=' + obj[key];
}).join('&');

And the ES2017 equivalent: (thanks to Lukas)

let str = Object.entries(obj).map(([key, val]) => `${key}=${val}`).join('&');

Note: You probably want to use encodeURIComponent() if the keys/values are not URL encoded.

11
  • 55
    I would only change + encodeURIComponent(obj[key]) Dec 2, 2015 at 1:10
  • 1
    @JacobValenta that's not part of the question
    – benweet
    Dec 2, 2015 at 9:55
  • 7
    Here it is in ES2015 Object.entries(obj).map(([key, val]) => `${key}=${val}`).join('&')
    – Lukas
    May 8, 2017 at 8:32
  • 3
    This breaks down if the object has any nested properties. Dec 1, 2017 at 20:58
  • 4
    To encode the ES2015 answer change to: =${encodeURIComponent(val)}
    – BBlackwo
    Jan 29, 2018 at 7:42
124
var str = "";
for (var key in obj) {
    if (str != "") {
        str += "&";
    }
    str += key + "=" + encodeURIComponent(obj[key]);
}

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/WFPen/

13
  • 5
    Why not use a function with recursion? Jul 4, 2011 at 0:53
  • 1
    thanks @aroth! I only accepted @patrick's answer above over yours (they are essentially the same) because he was first, I believe. I'm very grateful for your response.
    – bobsoap
    Jul 4, 2011 at 1:06
  • 4
    @bobsoap: I think @aroth was a little ahead of me, so I'd give @aroth the tick all other things being equal.
    – user113716
    Jul 4, 2011 at 1:08
  • 3
    Shouldn't the obj[key] be wrapped in encodeURIComponent()? What happens if 'somethingelse' was 'something&else'?
    – James S
    Nov 21, 2014 at 9:22
  • 1
    I'm pretty sure this should not be the accepted answer, or nearly every answer on this stackoverflow thread. Primary reason being none of them with the exception of possible @zac's answer below will satisfy properly encoding this object, { a:[ 1, 2 ], b:{ c:3, d:[ 4, 5 ], e:{ x:[ 6 ], y:7, z:[ 8, 9 ] }, f:true, g:false, h:undefined }, i:[ 10, 11 ], j:true, k:false, l:[ undefined, 0 ], m:"cowboy hat?" }; It does look like @UnLoCo suggested an NPM library that will also work, which pulls the functioning param method out of jQuery to be standalone.
    – Wes
    May 13, 2019 at 19:51
34

ES2017 approach

Object.entries(obj).map(([key, val]) => `${key}=${encodeURIComponent(val)}`).join('&')
4
  • 2
    ES2017, technically. Oct 18, 2017 at 15:15
  • 3
    this needs encoding of both key and value. see other answers re encodeURIComponent.
    – hraban
    Sep 11, 2019 at 15:55
  • 1
    also will not work with nested objects
    – LaCodeM
    Nov 30, 2021 at 10:10
  • I fixed the encodeURIComponent part but the nested object part still holds true. Although if you want to serialize and send an object as a parameter to your key, the will still work
    – Lukas
    Dec 9, 2021 at 14:24
27

ES6:

function params(data) {
  return Object.keys(data).map(key => `${key}=${encodeURIComponent(data[key])}`).join('&');
}

console.log(params({foo: 'bar'}));
console.log(params({foo: 'bar', baz: 'qux$'}));

0
22

For one level deep...

var serialiseObject = function(obj) {
    var pairs = [];
    for (var prop in obj) {
        if (!obj.hasOwnProperty(prop)) {
            continue;
        }
        pairs.push(prop + '=' + obj[prop]);
    }
    return pairs.join('&');
}

jsFiddle.

There was talk about a recursive function for arbitrarily deep objects...

var serialiseObject = function(obj) {
    var pairs = [];
    for (var prop in obj) {
        if (!obj.hasOwnProperty(prop)) {
            continue;
        }
        if (Object.prototype.toString.call(obj[prop]) == '[object Object]') {
            pairs.push(serialiseObject(obj[prop]));
            continue;
        }
        pairs.push(prop + '=' + obj[prop]);
    }
    return pairs.join('&');
}

jsFiddle.

This of course means that the nesting context is lost in the serialisation.

If the values are not URL encoded to begin with, and you intend to use them in a URL, check out JavaScript's encodeURIComponent().

5
  • 1
    alex: Sorry, we're closed... ;o)
    – user113716
    Jul 4, 2011 at 1:10
  • +1 for being safer than I'm willing to be: .hasOwnProperty(prop).
    – user113716
    Jul 4, 2011 at 1:13
  • this is great - just need 1 level for now, but the recursive function is good to have. Thanks for adding it!
    – bobsoap
    Jul 4, 2011 at 1:19
  • 1
    @ripper234 You're free to not use that method, if it suits your requirements.
    – alex
    Jul 18, 2013 at 15:09
  • This works: ``` const findOptions = { where: {id: facilityId.toString()}, include: [ serialiseObject({ association: 'Insurances', where: { amount: '9.0000' } }), ] }; const searchParams = serialiseObject(findOptions); ```
    – Ray Koren
    Aug 2, 2022 at 16:21
8

If you're using NodeJS 13.1 or superior you can use the native querystring module to parse query strings.

const qs = require('querystring');
let str = qs.stringify(obj)
1
7
Object.keys(obj).map(k => `${encodeURIComponent(k)}=${encodeURIComponent(obj[k])}`).join('&')
5

Since I made such a big deal about a recursive function, here is my own version.

function objectParametize(obj, delimeter, q) {
    var str = new Array();
    if (!delimeter) delimeter = '&';
    for (var key in obj) {
        switch (typeof obj[key]) {
            case 'string':
            case 'number':
                str[str.length] = key + '=' + obj[key];
            break;
            case 'object':
                str[str.length] = objectParametize(obj[key], delimeter);
        }
    }
    return (q === true ? '?' : '') + str.join(delimeter);
}

http://jsfiddle.net/userdude/Kk3Lz/2/

3
  • 3
    Just some random thoughts (a) [] is preferred over new Array() (b) You can use delimiter = delimiter || '&'; for the argument default (and you spelt it wrong) (c) Iterating with for ( in ) will iterate over all enumerable properties, including things on the prototype chain (obj.hasOwnProperty() defends against this) (d) typeof can lie about what things are, e.g. some numbers can be Object if constructed with the Number() constructor (e) Array have a push() method for adding members (f) comparing to true is redundant. I am a nitpicky bastard but you wanted feedback! :)
    – alex
    Jul 4, 2011 at 22:41
  • 1
    ...and if you thing Crockford is right about everything, you shouldn't let switch cases fall through. I disagree with him on that though. :D
    – alex
    Jul 4, 2011 at 22:42
  • @alex - I appreciate it. a) I had that at first, it was late and I was sleepy; b) not sure what the improvement is, the second was also a sleep-deprived moment; c) I was wondering why you used hasOwnProperty(); d) that's certainly true and a good point; e) I've never gotten use to using push() or pop() methods; f) break or not to break, that is the question. Thank you for your detailed input. :) Jul 4, 2011 at 23:18
5

Just for the record and in case you have a browser supporting ES6, here's a solution with reduce:

Object.keys(obj).reduce((prev, key, i) => (
  `${prev}${i!==0?'&':''}${key}=${obj[key]}`
), '');

And here's a snippet in action!

// Just for test purposes
let obj = {param1: 12, param2: "test"};

// Actual solution
let result = Object.keys(obj).reduce((prev, key, i) => (
  `${prev}${i!==0?'&':''}${key}=${obj[key]}`
), '');

// Run the snippet to show what happens!
console.log(result);

0
4

A useful code when you have the array in your query:

var queryString = Object.keys(query).map(key => {
    if (query[key].constructor === Array) {
        var theArrSerialized = ''
        for (let singleArrIndex of query[key]) {
            theArrSerialized = theArrSerialized + key + '[]=' + singleArrIndex + '&'
        }
        return theArrSerialized
    }
    else {
        return key + '=' + query[key] + '&'
    }
}
).join('');
console.log('?' + queryString)
4

This one-liner also handles nested objects and JSON.stringify them as needed:

let qs = Object.entries(obj).map(([k, v]) => `${k}=${encodeURIComponent(typeof (v) === "object" ? JSON.stringify(v) : v)}`).join('&')
2
  • 1
    Nice approach but it fails on this nesting: {apple:['old'],['blue'],banana:['fresh','green']} which should turn into something like apple=old,blue&banana=fresh,green
    – Fred
    Mar 13, 2021 at 17:47
  • @Fred - Fails b/c JSON.stringify is expecting a valid JSON format. Apr 18, 2022 at 20:58
3

If you need a recursive function that will produce proper URL parameters based on the object given, try my Coffee-Script one.

@toParams = (params) ->
    pairs = []
    do proc = (object=params, prefix=null) ->
      for own key, value of object
        if value instanceof Array
          for el, i in value
            proc(el, if prefix? then "#{prefix}[#{key}][]" else "#{key}[]")
        else if value instanceof Object
          if prefix?
            prefix += "[#{key}]"
          else
            prefix = key
          proc(value, prefix)
        else
          pairs.push(if prefix? then "#{prefix}[#{key}]=#{value}" else "#{key}=#{value}")
    pairs.join('&')

or the JavaScript compiled...

toParams = function(params) {
  var pairs, proc;
  pairs = [];
  (proc = function(object, prefix) {
    var el, i, key, value, _results;
    if (object == null) object = params;
    if (prefix == null) prefix = null;
    _results = [];
    for (key in object) {
      if (!__hasProp.call(object, key)) continue;
      value = object[key];
      if (value instanceof Array) {
        _results.push((function() {
          var _len, _results2;
          _results2 = [];
          for (i = 0, _len = value.length; i < _len; i++) {
            el = value[i];
            _results2.push(proc(el, prefix != null ? "" + prefix + "[" + key + "][]" : "" + key + "[]"));
          }
          return _results2;
        })());
      } else if (value instanceof Object) {
        if (prefix != null) {
          prefix += "[" + key + "]";
        } else {
          prefix = key;
        }
        _results.push(proc(value, prefix));
      } else {
        _results.push(pairs.push(prefix != null ? "" + prefix + "[" + key + "]=" + value : "" + key + "=" + value));
      }
    }
    return _results;
  })();
  return pairs.join('&');
};

This will construct strings like so:

toParams({a: 'one', b: 'two', c: {x: 'eight', y: ['g','h','j'], z: {asdf: 'fdsa'}}})

"a=one&b=two&c[x]=eight&c[y][0]=g&c[y][1]=h&c[y][2]=j&c[y][z][asdf]=fdsa"
1
  • I think I'll hang it on the wall Jan 30, 2020 at 13:16
3

You can use jQuery's param method:

var obj = {
  param1: 'something',
  param2: 'somethingelse',
  param3: 'another'
}
obj['param4'] = 'yetanother';
var str = jQuery.param(obj);
alert(str);
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

3

A functional approach.

var kvToParam = R.mapObjIndexed((val, key) => {
  return '&' + key + '=' + encodeURIComponent(val);
});

var objToParams = R.compose(
  R.replace(/^&/, '?'),
  R.join(''),
  R.values,
  kvToParam
);

var o = {
  username: 'sloughfeg9',
  password: 'traveller'
};

console.log(objToParams(o));
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/ramda/0.22.1/ramda.min.js"></script>

2
var str = '';

for( var name in obj ) {
    str += (name + '=' + obj[name] + '&');
}

str = str.slice(0,-1);

Give this a shot.

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/T2UWT/

7
  • 1
    @Jared: Less efficient than a loop.
    – user113716
    Jul 4, 2011 at 0:54
  • @Jared: username not needed below Qs and As. Notifications are automatic.
    – user113716
    Jul 4, 2011 at 0:54
  • "Less performant"? If I pass in an arbitrary object, and want a GET string to be returned, what does performance have to do with it? Jul 4, 2011 at 0:55
  • @Jared: I'm sorry, but perhaps I'm not understanding your meaning. If you're suggesting the use of recursive function calls rather than a loop, then I'm quite certain that the recursive functions will perform more slowly than the loop. Have I misunderstood your point?
    – user113716
    Jul 4, 2011 at 0:57
  • 1
    Well, I don't know I guess. If there were a function that you send it an object and output a string-concatenated GET-qualified version of that object, I don't imagine a single loop will always deal with the input. Of course, a single-level loop will always "outperform" a multi-level recursion, but a single-level loop won't even handle a multi-level object, IMO. Jul 4, 2011 at 1:00
1
Object.toparams = function ObjecttoParams(obj) 
{
  var p = [];
  for (var key in obj) 
  {
    p.push(key + '=' + encodeURIComponent(obj[key]));
  }
  return p.join('&');
};
1

I needed something that processes nested objects as well as arrays.

const Util = {
  isArray: function(val) {
    return Object.prototype.toString.call(val) === '[object Array]';
  },
  isNil: function(val) {
    return val === null || Util.typeOf(val)
  },
  typeOf: function(val, type) {
    return (type || 'undefined') === typeof val;
  },
  funEach: function(obj, fun) {
    if (Util.isNil(obj))
      return;      // empty value

    if (!Util.typeOf(obj, 'object'))
      obj = [obj]; // Convert to array

    if (Util.isArray(obj)) {
      // Iterate over array
      for (var i = 0, l = obj.length; i < l; i++)
        fun.call(null, obj[i], i, obj);
    } else {
      // Iterate over object
      for (var key in obj)
        Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(obj, key) && fun.call(null, obj[key], key, obj);
    }
  }
};

const serialize = (params) => {
  let pair = [];

  const encodeValue = v => {
    if (Util.typeOf(v, 'object'))
      v = JSON.stringify(v);

    return encodeURIComponent(v);
  };

  Util.funEach(params, (val, key) => {
    let isNil = Util.isNil(val);

    if (!isNil && Util.isArray(val))
      key = `${key}[]`;
    else
      val = [val];

    Util.funEach(val, v => {
      pair.push(`${key}=${isNil ? "" : encodeValue(v)}`);
    });
  });

  return pair.join('&');
};

Usage:

serialize({
  id: null,
  lat: "27",
  lng: "53",
  polygon: ["27,53", "31,18", "22,62", "..."]
}); // "id=&lat=27&lng=53&polygon[]=27%2C53&polygon[]=31%2C18&polygon[]=22%2C62&polygon[]=..."
1
  • This was very helpful, since I needed something that could handle nested objects. Thanks @AamirR
    – rumski20
    Nov 12, 2021 at 19:09
0

this method uses recursion to descend into object hierarchy and generate rails style params which rails interprets as embedded hashes. objToParams generates a query string with an extra ampersand on the end, and objToQuery removes the final amperseand.

 function objToQuery(obj){
  let str = objToParams(obj,'');
  return str.slice(0, str.length);
}
function   objToParams(obj, subobj){
  let str = "";

   for (let key in obj) {
     if(typeof(obj[key]) === 'object') {
       if(subobj){
         str += objToParams(obj[key], `${subobj}[${key}]`);
       } else {
         str += objToParams(obj[key], `[${key}]`);
       }

     } else {
       if(subobj){
         str += `${key}${subobj}=${obj[key]}&`;
       }else{
         str += `${key}=${obj[key]}&`;
       }
     }
   }
   return str;
 }
0
0

You could use npm lib query-string

const queryString = require('query-string');

querystring.stringify({ foo: 'bar', baz: ['qux', 'quux'], corge: '' });
// Returns 'foo=bar&baz=qux&baz=quux&corge='
0

const obj = { id: 1, name: 'Neel' };
let str = '';
str = Object.entries(obj).map(([key, val]) => `${key}=${val}`).join('&');
console.log(str);

0

We should also handle the cases when the value of any entry is undefined, that key should not be included in the serialized string.

const serialize = (obj) => {
  return Object.entries(obj)
    .filter(([, value]) => value)
    .map(([key, value]) => `${key}=${encodeURIComponent(value)}`)
    .join('&');
}
0
export const convertObjToUrlParams = (obj) =>
{
    var paramString = '';
    for (let key in obj)
    {
        if (obj[key] !== null && obj[key] !== undefined)
        {
            paramString += '&';
            paramString += key + "=" + obj[key];
        }
    }
    return paramString;
}

Output Ex: &firstName=NoDo&userId=2acf67ed-73c7-4707-9b49-17e78afce42e&email=n@n.dk&phoneNumber=12345678&password=123456

0

try this... this is working for nested object also..

let my_obj = {'single':'this is single', 'nested':['child1','child2']};

((o)=>{ return Object.keys(o).map(function(key){ let ret=[]; if(Array.isArray(o[key])){ o[key].forEach((item)=>{ ret.push(`${key}[]=${encodeURIComponent(item)}`); }); }else{ ret.push(`${key}=${encodeURIComponent(o[key])}`); } return ret.join("&");  }).join("&"); })(my_obj);
0

A quick ES6 answer:

const paramsObject = {
   foo: "bar",
   biz: "baz"
}

const params = Object.entries(paramsObject)
                 .map(([k, v]) => `${k}=${v}`)
                 .join('&');

// Output: foo=bar&biz=baz
-1

With Axios and infinite depth:

<pre>
    <style>
      textarea {
        width: 80%;
        margin-bottom: 20px;
      }
      label {
        font-size: 18px;
        font-weight: bold;
      }
    </style>
    <label>URI</label>
    <textarea id="uri"  rows="7"></textarea>
    <label>All Defaults (Bonus): </label>
    <textarea id="defaults" rows="20"></textarea>
</pre>

<script src="https://unpkg.com/axios/dist/axios.min.js"></script>

<script>
  const instance = axios.create({
    baseUrl: 'http://my-api-server',
    url: '/user'
  })
  const uri = instance.getUri({
    params: {
      id: '1234',
      favFruits: [
        'banana',
        'apple',
        'strawberry'
      ],
      carConfig: {
        items: ['keys', 'laptop'],
        type: 'sedan',
        other: {
          music: ['on', 'off', {
            foo: 'bar'
          }]
        }
      }
    }
  })
  const defaults = JSON.stringify(instance.defaults, null, 2)
  document.getElementById('uri').value = uri
  document.getElementById('defaults').value = defaults
</script>

Good Luck...

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