6

I have the following code:

class A {
  private:
    int i;
 };

class B : public A {
 private:
  int j;
 };

When I check sizeof(B), it appears to be sizeof(base) + sizeof(derived). However, my understanding of inheritance is that the private members of a base class are not inherited. Why then are they included in the result of sizeof(B)?

5

You either misunderstand sizeof or your misunderstand the layout (in memory) of C++ objects.

For performance reason (to avoid the cost of indirection), compilers will often implement Derivation using Composition:

// A
+---+
| i |
+---+

// B
+---+---+
| A | j |
+---+---+

Note that if private, B cannot peek in A even though it contains it.

The sizeof operator will then return the size of B, including the necessary padding (for alignment correction) if any.

If you want to learn more, I heartily recommend Inside the C++ Object Model by Stanley A. Lippman. While compiler dependent, many compilers do in fact use the same basic principles.

  • How exactly would this be implemented without doing it this way? (Vis a vis cost of indirection?) – Billy ONeal Jul 5 '11 at 4:57
  • @Billy: you could decide that the base classes are embedded via a pointer (created by new and removed by delete). Then the base class would always occupy 4 or 8 bytes (depending on the system). It would be somewhat better ABI wise, but much more costly. – Matthieu M. Jul 5 '11 at 6:19
  • M.: Actually, you cannot do that. If it is created as an automatic variable, then it has to exist in automatic storage. Using something like new would be putting it in dynamic storage. (Moreover, if all you had was a base class pointer you'd have no way to get back to the derived parts of the object -- the bases don't know about their derivers) – Billy ONeal Jul 5 '11 at 6:22
  • @Billy: Automatic variable does not mean stack, it means the memory is managed for you. Good point wrt getting from base to derived, but your forget that it's already solved for virtual inheritance (although it IS costlier). – Matthieu M. Jul 5 '11 at 6:24
  • Most inheritance is not virtual. I don't see how that solves anything. – Billy ONeal Jul 5 '11 at 6:25
8

all member variables are inherited. the private protected public modifiers only alter who has access to those variables

6

You misunderstand what private does. In your code snippet it simply prevents non-members and non-friends of A from accessing i. It's just an access-control modifier. Instances of B will have data members of A, even though B won't have (direct) access to it.

An analogy that shows that this does in fact make sense:

class Human
{
protected:
    void UseCognitivePowers() { brain.Process(); }
private:
    Brain brain;
    // ...
};

class StackOverflowUserInSilico : public Human
{
private:
    void AnswerStackOverflowQuestion(int questionId)
    {
        // ...
        // magic occurs here
        // ...
        UseCognitivePowers();
    }
};

Even though brain is private in the Human class, StackOverflowUserInSilico will have a Brain since StackOverflowUserInSilico derives from Human. This is needed, otherwise the UseCognitivePowers() function won't work even though StackOverflowUserInSilico inherits the method from Human.

Of course whether subclasses of Human will actually take advantage of the UseCognitivePowers() method afforded to them by the Human class is a totally different matter.

  • @David: That's because the argument is wrong. The correct argument is: X is a human, humans have brains, therefore X has a brain which is perfectly reasonable. – Lightness Races BY-SA 3.0 Jul 4 '11 at 10:12
3

It is inherited - the derived class object will contain it, but it can't be accessed by member functions of the derived class.

  • hey..thanks a lot..so the derived class inherits every thing,but the derived class public member functions cannot access the private members of base class ri8! – srinuvenu Jul 4 '11 at 8:03
2

This has already been answered in a few other answers: access specifiers restrict access, but the member attributes of the class are still inherited.

I just wanted to provide a rationale, as I usually learn better when I see the reasons for that. Basically, when you inherit from an type, the derived type contains a subobject of the base type, as small or large as the base might be. The reason for needing all of the member variables is that the derived object is a base object, and base level member functions can be called on it. Even if the derived type cannot access the private member attribute, the base methods that can be called on that object might still need to access it, so the members must be there:

class base {
   int x;
public:
   base() : x(0) {}
// ...
   void printout() {
      std::cout << x << std::endl;
   }
};
class derived : public base {
// ... assume that derived does not hide `printout`
};
int main() {
   derived d;
   d.printout();  // this requires access to d.base::x
}

This is only a simple example, and there are a few things that you can say here to argue that in some cases x can be made unneeded (we are overriding/hiding printout in the derived object...) but the language still allows you to access a hidden/overridden member method by qualifying, so d.base::printout() would still access printout at the base level, and that in turns requires x.

0

Access specifiers (public/private/protected) don't affect inherited "object size" in anyway.

  • They do. They control which members of the class will be visible in the drived class. – Alok Save Jul 4 '11 at 7:52
  • @iammilind: they do affect the size too. Because of an arcane rule that stipulates that they affect the layout of the class, changing a specifier might change the final class size... – Matthieu M. Jul 4 '11 at 8:09
  • Matthieu's right - 11.1-2 and 9.2-12 - vaguely recall discussions of this allow an each check re the member's offset to also indicate the protection level (i.e. if (some_class_member.offset >= first_private_offset) /* it's private */). It might have also been an attempt to facilitate use of some real or postulated run-time security mechanism (e.g. with hardware allowing fine-grained memory access control, lock/unlock privates as private member functions called/return). Anyway, alignment rules mean order can affect efficiency of padding. – Tony Delroy Jul 4 '11 at 8:47
0

i dont know what language this is, but when you inherit the original object still exists. that is why you can still call base.method()

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