1

I am trying to run the below mentioned code for loop using @threads for multi-threading, however the results always portray an error of mismatching number of outputs.

using Combinatorics, Base.Threads
import Base.Threads.@threads
func(x, y)
result = Float64[]
a = Float64[]
@threads for c in combinations(1:n, 2)
        a, b = c
        result = func(a, b)
        push!(result, result)
        push!(a, a)     
     end

The error observed during the processing:

DimensionMismatch("column :result has length 60 and column :a has length 50")

Please suggest an approach which make sure that no mutations from the loop are missed.

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    There are a number of problems in your example: putting obvious name collisions aside (global a vs local a, global result vs local result), Combinatorics.combinations` produces an object on which I don't think Base.threads knows how to iterate. So I wonder how you even got to the point where race conditions would happen. – François Févotte Jan 14 at 8:23
  • 1
    Also, when you refer to "I/O operations" in the title of you question, are you actually referring to the push! operations on your vectors? If so, these are not I/O, but rather mutations – François Févotte Jan 14 at 8:24
  • @FrançoisFévotte thanks for the correction, i have changed the title to mutations. – Mohammad Saad Jan 14 at 10:22
  • @FrançoisFévotte, Thanks for the feedback, I will try to resolve the code as per the suggestion and will update once i find the correct approach. – Mohammad Saad Jan 14 at 10:26
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One thing that does not work in your example is that all threads are mutating (via push!) the same vectors (result and a) possibly concurrently, thereby allowing race conditions to happen.

One way around this would be to have a collection of vectors (one per thread); each thread only modifies its own vector (identified by it threadid()).

With such a technique, a simplified version of your example could look like this:

# The function we want to apply to each element
julia> f(x) = 2x+1
f (generic function with 1 method)

# Two collections of vectors (one vector for each thread)
# that will hold the results for each thread
julia> results = [Float64[] for _ in 1:Threads.nthreads()];
julia> as      = [Float64[] for _ in 1:Threads.nthreads()]
8-element Vector{Vector{Float64}}:
 []
 []
 []
 []
 []
 []
 []
 []

julia> Threads.@threads for a in 1:10
           result = f(a)

           # Each thread only ever mutates its own result vector: 
           #    results[Threads.threadid()]
           push!(results[Threads.threadid()], result)
           push!(as[Threads.threadid()],      a)
       end

Note that you'll get a collection of results, indexed by the id of the thread that produced them.

# Now you get a collection of results, indexed by the id of the thread which produced them
julia> results
8-element Vector{Vector{Float64}}:
 [3.0, 5.0]  # These results have been produced by thread #1
 [7.0, 9.0]
 [11.0]
 [13.0]
 [15.0]
 [17.0]
 [19.0]
 [21.0]

julia> as
8-element Vector{Vector{Float64}}:
 [1.0, 2.0]
 [3.0, 4.0]
 [5.0]
 [6.0]
 [7.0]
 [8.0]
 [9.0]
 [10.0]

In the end, you therefore need to concatenate or flatten all resulting vectors in some way in order to combine all thread-specific results into one. One way would be to concatenate all results (which will allocate a new, large vector to hold all results):

julia> reduce(vcat, results)
10-element Vector{Float64}:
  3.0
  5.0
  7.0
  9.0
 11.0
 13.0
 15.0
 17.0
 19.0
 21.0

julia> reduce(vcat, as)
10-element Vector{Float64}:
  1.0
  2.0
  3.0
  4.0
  5.0
  6.0
  7.0
  8.0
  9.0
 10.0

Another way would be to directly iterate on the nested results, flattening them on the fly (so as not to allocate double the memory to store them in a flat fashion):

julia> using Base.Iterators: flatten

julia> for r in flatten(results)
           println(r)
       end
3.0
5.0
7.0
9.0
11.0
13.0
15.0
17.0
19.0
21.0

julia> for (a, r) in zip(flatten(as), flatten(results))
           println("$a -> $r")
       end
1.0 -> 3.0
2.0 -> 5.0
3.0 -> 7.0
4.0 -> 9.0
5.0 -> 11.0
6.0 -> 13.0
7.0 -> 15.0
8.0 -> 17.0
9.0 -> 19.0
10.0 -> 21.0
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  • Thank you for detailed explanation @FrançoisFévotte, Highly appreciated!! I have tried this approach and it works. – Mohammad Saad Jan 18 at 8:24

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