11

I know I can restrict the access to an ASP.NET MVC 3 application using the authorization tag in web.config

   <authentication mode="Windows"></authentication>
    <roleManager enabled="true" defaultProvider="AspNetWindowsTokenRoleProvider" />
    <authorization>
      <allow roles="MyDomain\MyGroup" />
      <deny users="*" />
      <deny users="?" />
    </authorization>

or decorating the controller base class with an [Authorize()] attribute (or even with a custom Authorize attribute)

[AdminOnly]
public class BaseController : Controller{}

The question is: are they alternative and equivalent approaches? Should I always use one approach rather than the other? Which elements should I keep in mind?

12

I know I can restrict the access to an ASP.NET MVC 3 application using the authorization tag in web.config

No, don't use this in ASP.NET MVC.

The question is: are they alternative and equivalent approaches?

No, they are not alternative. You should not use the <authorization> tag in web.config in an ASP.NET MVC application because it is based on paths, whereas MVC works with controller actions and routes. The correct way to do authorization in ASP.NET MVC is using the [Authorize] attribute.

  • Reasonable. Please, let me understand better: if I'm not going to use any <location> tag, (that is, restricting the access to the whole application) why and how defining authorization in web.config could be a security hole? – Arialdo Martini Jul 4 '11 at 12:46
  • @Arialdo Martini, in the location tag you specify a path: for example you could restrict access to /admin. But in MVC you have routes. Those routes are defined in Global.asax. They reflect controllers and actions. So it is your controllers and actions that should be secured, not some nonexistent virtual paths. – Darin Dimitrov Jul 4 '11 at 13:19
  • 1
    yeah, clear. What if I won't use any location tag and I just set authorizations to the whole application? I mean, what if I use exactly the web.config reported in the question, which doesn't report any url nor any route?Can this represent a security hole, anyway? – Arialdo Martini Jul 4 '11 at 14:26
  • @Arialdo Martini, you could use Global Action Filters if you want to set authorization to the whole application. It is really the recommended way. – Darin Dimitrov Jul 4 '11 at 14:37
  • @Dimistrov Great, thank you for the complete answer. – Arialdo Martini Jul 4 '11 at 16:34

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