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I am new to Erlang, can anybody explain, what happens in this code snippet?

<<2.03:64/float>>.

<<64,0,61,112,163,215,10,61>>

<<2.03:32/float>>.

<<64,1,235,133>>

I am following Programming Erlang: Software for a Concurrent World by Joe Armstrong and the chapter Binaries and the Bit Syntax chapter 7.

If there is an answer already exists, kindly mark this is as duplicate. Thanks.

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  • You may not realize it, but other people who learned Erlang may have actually read that book, and therefore posting the page number would seem helpful. – 7stud Jan 15 at 14:59
  • @7stud added chapter number for future reference – Balaji Sundaram Jan 17 at 7:53
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Same results from C:

#include <stdio.h>
int main (int argc, char *argv[]) {
    float f = 2.03F;
    unsigned char *c;
    c = (unsigned char *) &f;
    for (int i = 0; i < 4; ++i)
        printf("%d ", c[i]);
    printf("\n");

    double d = 2.03;
    c = (unsigned char *) &d;
    for (int i = 0; i < 8; ++i)
        printf("%d ", c[i]);
    printf("\n");
}

Output:

133 235 1 64 
61 10 215 163 112 61 0 64 

or Perl:

$ perl -wE 'say join " ", map ord, split //, pack "f", 2.03' 
133 235 1 64
$ perl -wE 'say join " ", map ord, split //, pack "d", 2.03' 
61 10 215 163 112 61 0 64

That's how floating point numbers are represented internally. See Floating-point aritmetic.

A nice demo to experiment with the values here.

2
  • I am not familiar with c and perl, can you explain it using reverse engineering @choroba – Balaji Sundaram Jan 14 at 13:46
  • @BalajiSundaram: Follow the links. Copying all the stuff here is not needed, and I can't explain it in a shorter way. – choroba Jan 14 at 14:05
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<<2.03/float>>.
<<64,0,61,112,163,215,10,61>>

In erlang, the default size for a float binary is 64, so the output is stored as 8 X 8 = 64 bytes. when the default size for float is mentioned as 32, it is stored as 4 X 8 = 32 bytes. The below code shows how to extract bits from a byte.

[ K || <<K:1>> <= <<2.03/float>>].

[0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,0,1,0,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,1,0,1,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,0,1,0,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,1,0,1,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,0,1] 

the first 8 bits in the above output is "0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0", when converted to integer gives the below output.

 erlang:list_to_integer("01000000",2).
   64

similarly the next 8 bits gives 0, the third set of 8 bits gives 61 and so on.

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  1. Floats are represented by a secret code. Erlang interprets that secret code in order to output:

     <<64,0,61,112,163,215,10,61>>
    
  2. When you chop off the first 32 bits of the secret code, it means something totally different, and Erlang interprets the remaining 32 bits to output:

     <<64,1,235,133>>
    

which is why you don't just get:

    <<163,215,10,61>>

I am new to erlang

Then the bit syntax for floating point numbers is the least of your worries. If you understand it for integers, then move on.

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