1

Considering I have an Object with a list of properties like

Class Indicators
{
    guid Id
    double? Indocator1;
    double? Indocator1;

    .
    .double? IndocatorP;
}

I would like to add a property that tells directly Indicator Name that have max value among all Indicator properties.

Is there any hint or advise?

4
  • 1
    If the properties are defined on the class, their number is known at compile time, and will not change. – Mark Benningfield Jan 14 at 14:58
  • 2
    I have an Object with a list of properties Why not just put the data in a list? – Johnny Mopp Jan 14 at 14:59
  • 2
    What you typed are private fields, not properties. What are you trying to do in the first place? Why a class with numbered fields instead of a list? – Panagiotis Kanavos Jan 14 at 15:13
  • Please provide valid C# code. Please also share with us what have you tried so far and where did you stuck. Don't just come here and ask for the solution. – Peter Csala Jan 14 at 15:20
5

You need to use reflection to get the list of properties and get a list of the values to, for example, apply the Max Linq method:

public class Indicators
{
  public Guid Id { get; set; }
  public double? Indocator1 { get; set; }
  public double? Indocator2 { get; set; }
  public double? Indocator3 { get; set; }

  public (string name, double? value) GetMaxIndicator()
  {
    var pairs = GetType().GetProperties()
                         .Where(p => p.PropertyType == typeof(double?))
                         .Select(p => new
                                      {
                                        name = p.Name,
                                        value = (double?)p.GetValue(this)
                                      });
    string maxName= null;
    double? maxValue = null;
    foreach ( var item in pairs )
      if ( maxValue == null || item.value > maxValue )
      {
        maxName= item.name;
        maxValue = item.value;
      }
    return (maxName, maxValue );
  }
}

Test

static private void Test()
{
  var indicators = new Indicators();
  indicators.Indocator1 = 10;
  indicators.Indocator2 = null;
  indicators.Indocator3 = 20;
  var max = indicators.GetMaxIndicator();
  Console.WriteLine($"{max.name} = {max.value}");
}

Output

Indicator3 = 20

This sample assumes that members are read-write and it returns the last found in case of duplicates, but you can return a list of named value tuples instead.

You can use that for fields with GetFields.

Also you can combine both and you can filter the desired members using binding flags if, for example, you need non-public or static members.

Improvement for a cleaner and more robust design

You should prefer using a List, or an array if the number of indicators is fixed.

The entity class

public class Indicator : IComparable
{
  public string Name { get; set; }
  public double? Value { get; set; }
  public Indicator(string name, double? value = null)
  {
    Name = name;
    Value = value;
  }
  int IComparable.CompareTo(object obj)
  {
    var other = obj as Indicator;
    if ( other == null )
      throw new ArgumentException("Object is not an Indicator");
    if ( obj == null ) return 1;
    if ( Value == null && other.Value == null )
      return 0;
    else
    if ( Value == null )
      return -1;
    if ( other.Value == null )
      return 1;
    else
      return Value.Value.CompareTo(other.Value.Value);
  }
}

The collection class

public class Indicators
{
  public Guid Id { get; set; }
  public List<Indicator> Items { get; } = new List<Indicator>();
  //or
  public Indicator[] Items { get; } = new Indicator[IndicatorsCount];
}

Thus we can simply write:

  var indicators = new Indicators();
  indicators.Items.Add(new Indicator("Indicator1", 10));
  indicators.Items.Add(new Indicator("Indicator2", null));
  indicators.Items.Add(new Indicator("Indicator3", 20));
  var max = indicators.Items.Max();
  Console.WriteLine($"{max.Name} = {max.Value}");

That we can put in the class itself:

public class Indicators
{
  public Guid Id { get; set; }
  public double?[] Items { get; } = new double?[IndicatorsCount];
  public double? MaxValue => Items.Max();
}
2
  • 1
    You could use p => p.Name.StartsWith("Indocator") as the predicate given to Where clause trailoring GetProperties() above. Otherwise your sample explanation is great. Also you should use GetFields since the code sample is fields and not properties. And since no accessor is given it defaults to "internal" anyways so you need BindingFlags.Nonpublic | BindingFlags.Instance most likely. – Tore Aurstad Jan 14 at 15:13
  • 1
    Indeed. I assumed that the class only contained indicators, from an embedded device for example. I put a sample code using properties because of the title. – Olivier Rogier Jan 14 at 15:16

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