14

Is there a stand-alone VC++ compiler available for Windows? Even a CLI compiler is fine.

Since I'm using Windows in Virtualbox, Visual Studio is horribly slow due to insufficient memory.

  • Do you really need VC++? Or just "a" C++ compiler for Windows? – Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 4 '11 at 15:26
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    I need a VC++ compiler. – Hrishikesh Murali Jul 4 '11 at 16:16
  • Well, there is only one VC++ compiler: VC++. What is the origin of this requirement? Is it that you actually want to write Managed C++, not C++? – Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 4 '11 at 16:26
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    I'm a novice in reverse engineering. For the same, I need to practice by compiling programs in VC++ and then disassembling it in order to understand how each program works. Hence, I just need the VC++ compiler, not the entire IDE. :) – Hrishikesh Murali Jul 4 '11 at 17:03
  • Also, I'm told that most real-world applications are compiled using VC++ - Hence the requirement for VC++ compiler – Hrishikesh Murali Jul 4 '11 at 17:03
7

Now there is Microsoft Visual C++ Build Tools.

Custom install and unselect all SDKs for a 1GB cross platform "minimal" environment.

It can be reduced to ~300MB if you delete everything non x86 after installation.

  • Can you give me an advice - what components I really need to choose to install compiler? There are a lot of different products here, and I see only "Compiler for C#" contains word "compiler" :) – Mikhail_Sam Aug 14 '17 at 11:26
  • I think you need the windows sdk for a complete implementation of the stdlib. And there is not much choosing. As i said Once everything is installed if you require a smaller env, you may delete flies specific to architectures you're not targetting. – xvan Aug 14 '17 at 11:44
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    I wrote this answer for 2015 release, 2017 adds more options. You shouldn't need any of them. Msvc is not optional so it's not listed That said, I'd install the Windows SDK because i needed it on a pure c++ project (probably the compiler checked unneeded dependencies). Also install Make tools if you need them. – xvan Aug 14 '17 at 11:55
6

You don't have to use visual studio (or even the visual studio commandline devenv.exe). You can use the C++ compiler directly: cl.exe.

Here is the MS page for the compiler options

  • Thanks! Is it a stand-alone executable or are there dependencies? I need to save as much space as I can, so I'm thinking - why not just copy the compiler and it's dependencies to do my work, and delete the rest? :) – Hrishikesh Murali Jul 4 '11 at 16:22
  • @Hrishikesh: Why not give it a go and find out what dependencies you can do without? – Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 4 '11 at 16:27
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    I didn't check but I guess it has dependencies (dumpbin.exe would help you find some of them). – nakhli Jul 4 '11 at 16:38
  • @Chaker Nakhli: +1 for mentioning dumpbin.exe - great help! – nevelis Sep 13 '11 at 2:01
  • @nevelis in another life, I wrote a tool that uses dumpbin and graphviz lib (graphviz.org) to draw dll dependency graphs for large projects. Thank you for the upvote ^_^ – nakhli Sep 14 '11 at 12:21
6

Windows SDK include c++ compiler.

2

You can run a VC++ build from the command-line, which may be a bit lighter on resources that running the full GUI. Have a look at the Microsoft page for details, but in brief you can build an existing project using, for example:

devenv MySolution /Build Debug

You can also set up your project to use makefiles, and use nmake just as you would use make to build it.

To make all of this much easier, when you install Visual Studio you get a "Visual Studio Commandline" shortcut, which sets up all of the required paths for you.

-2

Have you considered Cygwin??

http://www.cygwin.com/

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    How is Cygwin a "VC++" compiler? – Kerrek SB Jul 4 '11 at 15:14
  • "Even a CLI compiler is fine", its just another option, i know its not the same thing – greatodensraven Jul 4 '11 at 15:18
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    I'm confused, Cygwin doesn't even support the CLI (or do you want a Mono port for Cygwin??) That's just making it worse. I think the only compilers that can target the CLI are in the MSVS suite. – Kerrek SB Jul 4 '11 at 15:21
  • @Kerrek I think it is implied by the fact that he wants C++ that he is saying CLI as in Command Line Interface – alternative Jul 4 '11 at 16:41

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