4

There are extension methods for Nullable<T> like below.

using System;
using System.Runtime.CompilerServices;

namespace DoNotationish
{
    public static class NullableExtensions
    {
        public static U? Select<T, U>(this T? nullableValue, Func<T, U> f)
            where T : struct
            where U : struct
        {
            if (!nullableValue.HasValue) return null;
            return f(nullableValue.Value);
        }

        public static V? SelectMany<T, U, V>(this T? nullableValue, Func<T, U?> bind, Func<T, U, V> f)
            where T : struct
            where U : struct
            where V : struct
        {
            if (!nullableValue.HasValue) return null;
            T value = nullableValue.Value;
            U? bindValue = bind(value);
            if (!bindValue.HasValue) return null;
            return f(value, bindValue.Value);
        }
    }
}

This allows Nullable<T> to be used in query syntax. The following tests will pass.

        [Test]
        public void Test1()
        {
            int? nv1 = 5;
            int? nv2 = 3;
            var q = from v1 in nv1
                    from v2 in nv2
                    select v1 + v2;
            Assert.AreEqual(8, q);
        }

        [Test]
        public void Test2()
        {
            int? nv1 = null;
            int? nv2 = 3;
            var q = from v1 in nv1
                    from v2 in nv2
                    select v1 + v2;
            Assert.IsNull(q);
        }

However, if you try to chain 3 or more, it will be treated as an anonymous type and will not compile.

        [Test]
        public void Test3()
        {
            int? nv1 = 5;
            int? nv2 = 3;
            int? nv3 = 8;
            var q = from v1 in nv1
                    from v2 in nv2  // Error CS0453: anonymous type is not struct
                    from v3 in nv3
                    select v1 + v2 + v3;
            Assert.AreEqual(16, q);
        }

You can work around this issue by manually specifying to use ValueTuple as below, but this is ugly.

        [Test]
        public void Test3_()
        {
            int? nv1 = 5;
            int? nv2 = 3;
            int? nv3 = 8;
            var q = from v1 in nv1
                    from v2 in nv2
                    select (v1, v2) into temp      // ugly
                    from v3 in nv3
                    select temp.v1 + temp.v2 + v3; // ugly
            Assert.AreEqual(16, q);
        }

These simplified examples can be solved simply by using the + operator: var q = nv1 + nv2 + nv3;

However, you would find it more convenient to work with user-defined structs if you could write it fluently. Is there any good way?

0
3

Think about how the compiler would turn the query expression into SelectMany calls. It would turn it into something like:

var q =
    nv1.SelectMany(x => 
       nv2.SelectMany(x => nv3, (v2, v3) => new { v2, v3 }), 
       (v1, v2v3) => v1 + v2v3.v2 + v2v3.v3);

Note how the V of the second SelectMany call is inferred to be an anonymous class, which is a reference type, and doesn't fit the constraint of : struct.

Note that it specifically uses an anonymous class, rather than a ValueTuple ((v2, v3) => (v2, v3)). This is specified in the language spec:

A query expression with a second from clause followed by something other than a select clause:

from x1 in e1
from x2 in e2
...

is translated into

from * in ( e1 ) . SelectMany( x1 => e2 , ( x1 , x2 ) => new { x1 , x2 } )
...

So unfortunately, you can't do anything about it. You can try forking the Roslyn compiler to make it compile to create a ValueTuple instead, but technically that's not "C#" anymore.

OTOH, this idea could work if you write your own Nullable<T> type, and not constrain T to a value type, but I'm not sure that's worth it.

1
  • When you wrote "if you write your own Nullable<T> type", the same idea hit me. So yeah, had this "own Nullable<T> type lying around, so, I've just applied it on this problem. :^ – Teroneko Jan 23 at 11:20
1

Let's take a look at this query

from a in source1
from b in source2
from c in source3
from d in source4
// etc
select selector // how is it possible that a, b, c, d available in selector?

Such queries will be compiled as a chain of SelectMany calls

SelectMany(IEnumerable<TSource> source, 
           Func<TSource, IEnumerable<TCollection>> collectionSelector,
           Func<TSource, TCollection, TResult> resultSelector)

As you can see, it can accept only two arguments in result selector - of one of source collection type and one of second collection type returned by selector. So the only way to pass more than two arguments down the chain (so that all arguments eventually will arrive in the last result selector) is by creating anonymous types. And this is how it looks like:

source1
  .SelectMany(a => source2, (a, b) => new { a, b })
  .SelectMany(x1 => source3, (x1, c) => new { x1, c })
  .SelectMany(x2 => source4, (x2, d) => selector(x2.x1.a, x2.x1.b, x2.c, d));

Again, the result selector limited with two input arguments. So for your passing Test1 and Test2 anonymous type is not created, because both arguments can be passed to the result selector. But Test3 requires three arguments for the result selector and an intermediate anonymous type is created for that.


You cannot make your extension method to accept both nullable structs and generated anonymous types (which are reference types). I would suggest you create domain-specific extension methods Bind and Map. Pair of these methods will be aligned with functional programming domain much more than from v1 in nv1 queries:

public static U? Bind<T, U>(this T? maybeValue, Func<T, U?> binder)
    where T : struct
    where U : struct
        => maybeValue.HasValue ? binder(maybeValue.Value) : (U?)null;

public static U? Map<T, U>(this T? maybeValue, Func<T, U> mapper)
    where T : struct
    where U : struct
        => maybeValue.HasValue ? mapper(maybeValue.Value) : (U?)null;

And usage

nv1.Bind(v1 => nv2.Bind(v2 => nv3.Map(v3 => v1 + v2 + v3)))
   .Map(x => x * 2) // eg
0

Here is one workaround, but to be honest, I am not sure how practicable it is:

First I am using the structure YetNullable from my project from GitHub, so please take note that it is licensed under the MIT license:

MIT License

Copyright 2021 Teroneko

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.

using System;
using System.Diagnostics.CodeAnalysis;

namespace Teronis
{
    public struct YetNullable<T> : IEquatable<YetNullable<T>>, IYetNullable<T>
    {
        public static YetNullable<T> Null = new YetNullable<T>(default, true);

        [MaybeNull]
        public readonly T Value => value;
        public readonly bool HasValue => isNotNull;

        internal readonly T value;

        private readonly bool isNotNull;

        internal YetNullable([AllowNull] T value, bool isNull)
        {
            this.value = value!;
            isNotNull = !isNull;
        }

        public YetNullable([AllowNull] T key)
            : this(key, key is null) { }

        public override bool Equals(object? other)
        {
            if (!HasValue) {
                return other == null;
            }

            if (other == null) {
                return false;
            }

            return Value!.Equals(other);
        }

        public bool Equals(YetNullable<T> other) =>
            YetNullable.Equals(this, other);

        public override int GetHashCode()
        {
            if (HasValue) {
                return Value!.GetHashCode();
            }

            return 0;
        }

        public override string? ToString() =>
            Value?.ToString() ?? "";

        public static implicit operator YetNullable<T>([AllowNull] T key) =>
            new YetNullable<T>(key);

        public static implicit operator T(YetNullable<T> key) =>
            key.Value!;
    }
}

Here the source code of the workaround using above structure:

^using System;
using System.Diagnostics;
using Teronis;

namespace stackoverflow_65745802
{
    class Program
    {
        public static void Main()
        {
            TestWithNullableButThenConverted();
            TestWithImplicityAssignedYetNullable();
        }


        static void TestWithNullableButThenConverted()
        {
            int? nv1 = 5;
            int? nv2 = 3;
            int? nv3 = 8;

            var r = from v1 in nv1.ToNullable()
                    from v2 in nv2.ToNullable() 
                    select v1 + v2;

            Debug.Assert(8 == r, "not equal");

            var q = from v1 in nv1.ToNullable()
                    from v2 in nv2.ToNullable()  // No error anymore
                    from v3 in nv3.ToNullable()
                    select v1 + v2 + v3;

            Debug.Assert(16 == q, "not equal");
        }

        static void TestWithImplicityAssignedYetNullable()
        {
            YetNullable<int> nv1 = 5;
            YetNullable<int> nv2 = 3;
            YetNullable<int> nv3 = 8;

            var r = from v1 in nv1
                    from v2 in nv2
                    select v1 + v2;

            Debug.Assert(8 == r, "not equal");

            var q = from v1 in nv1
                    from v2 in nv2 // No error anymore
                    from v3 in nv3
                    select v1 + v2 + v3;

            Debug.Assert(16 == q, "not equal");
        }
    }
}

public static class YetNullableExtensions
{
    public static YetNullable<int> ToNullable(this int? nullableValue) =>
        new YetNullable<int>(nullableValue.Value);

    public static YetNullable<V> SelectMany<T, U, V>(this YetNullable<T> nullableValue, Func<T, YetNullable<U>> bind, Func<T, U, V> f)
        where U : struct
    {
        if (!nullableValue.HasValue)
        {
            return YetNullable<V>.Null;
        }

        T value = nullableValue.Value;
        YetNullable<U> bindValue = bind(value);

        if (!bindValue.HasValue)
        {
            return YetNullable<V>.Null;
        }

        return f(value, bindValue.Value);
    }
}

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