2

I want to use a variable that references an arithmetic operator within an if statement expression as shown below:

str = { '>60', '>60', '>-60', '=0' }
del = 75

function decode_prog(var1, var2)
    op = string.sub(var1, 1, 1)
    vb = tonumber(string.sub(var1, 2, 3))

    if var2 op vb then
        print("condition met")
    else 
        print('condition not meet')
    end
end
for i = 1, #str do
    decode_prog(str[i], del)
end

When the above code executes, it should either print "condition met" or "condition not met" based on the result of the operation, however I am instead receiving an error.

2
  • 2
    xyproblem.info I guess
    – Piglet
    Jan 16, 2021 at 9:48
  • You should include the specific error, you get, in your question
    – Nifim
    Jan 17, 2021 at 4:12

3 Answers 3

4

You cannot substitute a native Lua operator with a variable that references a function, the only way to go about what you are attempted to do is to create a set of functions within an associative array and set the index as a reference to the respective operation you want to conduct.

Looking at your list, you have a greater than (>) and equal to (=). We create a table for these operations that takes two parameters as follows.

local operators = {
    [">"] = function(x, y) return x > y end,
    ["="] = function(x, y) return x == y end,
    -- Add more operations as required.
}

You can then invoke the respective function from the decode_prog function by obtaining the operation character from the string, along with the numeric value itself - this is possible because you can obtain the function from the associative array where the index is the string of the operation we want to conduct.

local result = operators[op](var2, number)

This calls upon the operators array, uses the op to determine which index we need to go to for our appropriate operation, and returns the value.

Final Code:

str = { '>60', '>60', '>-60', '=0' }
del = 75

local operators = {
    [">"] = function(x, y) return x > y end,
    ["="] = function(x, y) return x == y end,
}

function decode_prog(var1, var2)
    local op = string.sub(var1, 1, 1) -- Fetch the arithmetic operator we intend to use.
    local number = tonumber(string.sub(var1, 2)) -- Strip the operator from the number string and convert the result to a numeric value.

    local result = operators[op](var2, number) -- Invoke the respective function from the operators table based on what character we see at position one.

    if result then
        print("condition met")
    else 
        print('condition not met')
    end
end

for i = 1, #str do
    decode_prog(str[i], del)
end
4
  • 1
    The >- is simply greater than negative 60 since the operator is string.sub(_, 1, 1).
    – IsawU
    Jan 16, 2021 at 7:46
  • 1
    Otherwise, this solution is quite a bit more elegant than mine. The code is very clear on what it does, even if you support hundreds of different operators.
    – IsawU
    Jan 16, 2021 at 7:50
  • Thanks for the clarification on the >- simply meaning negative!
    – Skully
    Jan 16, 2021 at 7:57
  • Also consider using local number = tonumber(string.sub(var1, 2)) to catch the whole rest of the string. Otherwise, you will get op == ">" and number == -6 instead of -60.
    – IsawU
    Jan 16, 2021 at 8:14
2

I can't make much sense of your code or what you want to achieve doing that but if could simply use load. You build your expression as a string and run it. Of course you should take care of two character operators like >= which I did not and you should validate your input.

local str={'>60','>60','>-60','=0'}
local del=75

function decode_prog(var1, var2)
  local operator = var1:sub(1,1):gsub("=", "==")
  local expr = string.format("return %d %s %s", var2,operator, var1:sub(2))
  print(string.format("condition %smet", load(expr)() and "" or "not "))
end

for i,v in ipairs(str) do
  decode_prog(v, del)
end
2
  • I'm actually curious about the performance. Can you tell how the load will perform compared to the array of functions for each operator? This solution is very nice, being able to resolve any operators without any additional coding, but I always perceived this kind of load() usage as not-the-best-idea, but I never thought to look into it.
    – IsawU
    Jan 16, 2021 at 19:36
  • 1
    @IsawU I have no idea. using an array should be faster. but this particular task doesn't look like something where performance matters.
    – Piglet
    Jan 16, 2021 at 20:12
0

A very simple way would be to add a condition for each supported operator:

function decode_prog(var1, var2)
  op = string.sub(var1, 1, 1)
  vb = tonumber(string.sub(var1, 2))  --remove the last argument and use tonumber()
  if vb == nil then return end  --if the string does not contain number

  if (op == ">" and var2 > vb) or (op == "=" and var2 == vb) --[[add more conditions here]] then
     print("condition met")
  else 
     print("condition not met")
  end
end

I changed the vb=string.sub(var1,2,3) line too. This form vb = tonumber(string.sub(var1, 2)) will allow use of numbers that have any number of digits and added tonumber() which will allow us to catch not-a-number errors when comparison would probably fail.

Then I added a logic to determine what the operator is and if the condition is met.

Operator limitations: This will only work with operators that are one character and operator such as >= will not be possible unless you use a different character for it. will not play nicely, since it is multiple characters.

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