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I've been trying to create to create method to add the products into ArrayList while checking if it already been there. But somehow the loop doesn't add product into ArrayList and I can't figure out why.

public class Shop1 {

    private String shopName;
    private ArrayList<Product> products;
    private ArrayList<Customer> customers;
    private ArrayList<Transaction> transactions;

    public Shop1(String shopName)
    {
        this.shopName = shopName;
        products = new ArrayList<Product>();
        customers = new ArrayList<Customer>();
        transactions = new ArrayList<Transaction>();
    }

    //addProduct
    public void addProduct(String product_id,String product_name,int product_price,int product_amnt)
    {
        for(Product p:products)
        {
            if(p.getproduct_name().equals(product_name)) 
            {
                int amnt;
                amnt = p.getproduct_stockamnt()+product_amnt;
                p.setproduct_stockamnt(amnt);
            }
            else 
            {
                Product pr = new Product(product_id,product_name,product_price,product_amnt);
                products.add(pr);
            }
        }
    }
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  • 1
    You're trying to add the product while looping through products. So if products is empty, nothing will happen.
    – khelwood
    Commented Jan 16, 2021 at 16:41

3 Answers 3

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You're trying to add the product while looping through products. So if products is empty, nothing will happen.

You want to loop through the products completely, and after that maybe add the product.

Something like this, for instance:

public void addProduct(String product_id, String product_name, int product_price, int product_amnt)
{
    for (Product p: products)
    {
        if (p.getproduct_name().equals(product_name)) 
        {
            int amnt = p.getproduct_stockamnt() + product_amnt;
            p.setproduct_stockamnt(amnt);
            return; // found so no need to go any further
        }
    }
    // We did not find it, so add a new product:
    Product pr = new Product(product_id,product_name,product_price,product_amnt);
    products.add(pr);
}
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There is one main problem with the method addProduct().

The use of the for-each loop is a method of iteration where you're creating a new temporary variable where you are storing the current element that has the pointer. Each iteration, the pointer is incremented (increased by 1) so in each iteration there will be a new element in the temporary variable. Therefore in your code in the line

amnt = p.getproduct_stockamnt()+product_amnt;
p.setproduct_stockamnt(amnt);

you are ultimately setting the stock amount of the temporary variable p to amnt. The next iteration the loop will go through will erase the last result and hence, your change will not be seen.

Using the for-index loop will allow a change to the actual ArrayList and not the temporary variable

Using the for-index loop

for(int i = 0;i<products.size();i++)
{
 Product currentProduct = products.get(i);
//similar to the for-each loop as there is a temporary variable
 if(currentProduct.getproduct_name().equals(product_name))
 {
   int amnt = currentProduct.getproduct_stockamt()+product_amnt;
   //however stock is being added to the original location in the list
   products.get(i).setproduct_stockamnt(amnt);
 }
 else
 {
   Product pr = new Product(product_id,product_name,product_price,product_amnt);
   products.add(pr);
 }
}
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Shop:

package stackoverflow.weirdshop;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Map.Entry;
import java.util.TreeMap;

public class Shop1 {



    private final TreeMap<Product, Long>    products2amount = new TreeMap<>();
    private final ArrayList<Customer>       customers       = new ArrayList<>();
    private final ArrayList<Transaction>    transactions    = new ArrayList<>();

    public final String shopName;

    public Shop1(final String pShopName) {
        this.shopName = pShopName;
    }



    public void changeStock(final Product pProduct, final int pAmount) {
        synchronized (products2amount) {
            final Long oldAmount = products2amount.get(pProduct); // you might also do some checks of how many you can remove with negative pAmount
            final long newAmount = (oldAmount == null) ? (pAmount) : (oldAmount.longValue() + pAmount);
            products2amount.put(pProduct, Long.valueOf(newAmount));
        }
    }



    public void printContent() {
        System.out.println("Contents of " + shopName + ":");
        for (final Entry<Product, Long> e : products2amount.entrySet()) {
            System.out.println("\t" + e.getKey() + "\tAmount: " + e.getValue());
        }
    }



}

Product:

package stackoverflow.weirdshop;

public class Product implements Comparable<Product> {



    public final String mID;
    public final String mName;
    public final int    mPrice;

    public Product(final String pID, final String pName, final int pPrice) {
        mID = pID;
        mName = pName;
        mPrice = pPrice;
    }



    public String getName() {
        return mName;
    }



    @Override public String toString() {
        return "Product [mID=" + mID + "\n\t\tmName=" + mName + "\n\t\tmPrice=" + mPrice + "]";
    }



    @Override public int compareTo(final Product pOther) {
        return mName.compareTo(pOther.mName); // sort only by name
    }



}

Simple Example:

package stackoverflow.weirdshop;

public class TestShop {



    public static void main(final String[] args) {
        final Product bier = new Product("0815", "Bier", 2);
        final Product schnaps = new Product("0123", "Schnaps", 8);
        final Product wein = new Product("9876", "Wein", 5);


        final Shop1 shop = new Shop1("Dings");
        shop.changeStock(bier, 20);
        shop.printContent();

        shop.changeStock(schnaps, 8);
        shop.changeStock(wein, 4);
        shop.printContent();

        shop.changeStock(bier, 13);
        shop.printContent();
    }



}

Output:

Contents of Dings:
    Product [mID=0815
        mName=Bier
        mPrice=2]   Amount: 20
Contents of Dings:
    Product [mID=0815
        mName=Bier
        mPrice=2]   Amount: 20
    Product [mID=0123
        mName=Schnaps
        mPrice=8]   Amount: 8
    Product [mID=9876
        mName=Wein
        mPrice=5]   Amount: 4
Contents of Dings:
    Product [mID=0815
        mName=Bier
        mPrice=2]   Amount: 33
    Product [mID=0123
        mName=Schnaps
        mPrice=8]   Amount: 8
    Product [mID=9876
        mName=Wein
        mPrice=5]   Amount: 4

Explanations:

Problems:

  • The problem of the OP's code was that his concept of adding was wrong. He iterated over a list. On an (initially) empty list, nothing would have happened.
  • He was also checking on non-unique identifiers, so if the list wasn't empty, multiple operations might have taken place.
  • Iterating over a list and then selecting the element(s) you want to manipulate will get quite inefficient, i.e. unnecessarily slow.

Solutions:

  • I provide dynamically allocatable but unique Producs. In this example they're created and used in my TestShop class as local variables, but you could also have them as
      1. global static fields or
      1. managed in another collection or
      1. Use inheritance for Product-specific implementations. So this is easily extensible.
    • CAUTION: Different Products should be allocated and managed in ONE place, not created randomly throughout the code. If that is done nontheless, use stacktrace analysis to reduce/prevent errors.
    • Those products do not have a counter of their own, they only represent the abstract type of Product.
  • The counter of the Products is maintained inside the Store, in the TreeMap products2amount. To access the counter, you need to provide a valid (i.e. existing) Product.
    • 'products2amount' is a TreeMap, so you can get a sorted output.
    • The sorting order can be managed in the Product's compareTo() method, or in any of its inheriting children.
    • If sorting does not play a role, use any other implementation of javaj.util.Map, like HashMap. If thread safety / concurrency plays a role, you can also use ConcurrentHashMap etc. AND you have to synchronize the method Shop1.changeStock()
    • consider implementing hashCode() and equals() for Product, if you want to use different Map implementations or inherited Product-specific behaviour
  • the final piece of mechanics is handled inside Shop1.changeStock()
    • You need a Product to identify the counter
    • oldAmount is the amount of the specific Product that existed before the change, or null if none was registered yet
    • newAmount will be initialized with the passed amount, if the Product had not been registered (oldAmount == null); else it will be the sum of oldAmount plus the passed amount
    • at the moment, there is not check that prevents under-emptying the stock, so currently you can take out more of the specific Product than you put in. There are basically two solutions: 1) do take out the full requested amount, but only as many as possible, OR 2) throw an Exception if after the operation the amount would fall below zero.

Further optimizations concerning Identity Management:

  • for identity management, the TreeMap uses Product's compareTo() and equals() methods. The current equals() methods is not implemented, so it falls back to the Objects.equals() implementation (the == identity check, so different instances with same member variables will NOT identify as the same object). SO at the moment we have true identity checks on our Products. Implement equals() for more specific predictability/behaviour.
  • For better ID management, the use of other types than String is encouraged, for example unique long values that are managed; and that get assigned at Product allocation. Make hashCode() and equals() use that ID ONLY.
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  • Please explain what you wrote and why it works the way it does Commented Jan 19, 2021 at 0:38
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    @KerwinSneijders is that enough or are there some more topics I shall shed some light on?
    – JayC667
    Commented Jan 19, 2021 at 1:26
  • 1
    That's a great addition! It wasn't meant as an explanation for me specifically but posting lines upon lines of code without explanation makes it somewhat useless. Thanks for expanding your answer! :) Commented Jan 19, 2021 at 1:29

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