I'm curious about how to emulate RPAD and LPAD functions for SQLite, formally, in the most general way. The goal is to be able to do

LPAD(column, character, repeat)
RPAD(column, character, repeat)

For non-constant table columns column, character, repeat. If character and repeat were known constants, then this would be a good, viable solution:

But what if the above should be executed like this:

SELECT LPAD(t.column, t.character, t.repeat) FROM t
SELECT LPAD(t.column, some_function(), some_other_function()) FROM t
SELECT LPAD(t.column, :some_bind_variable, :some_other_bind_variable) FROM t

How could this LPAD function be generally emulated? I'm lost with the possibilities:

A related question:

  • 1
    What are you using to connect to SQLite? The database engine has a "plugin" architecture where you can define additional functions (UDFs) and include them in your sql... – Stobor Jul 22 '12 at 10:48
  • @Stobor: Good point. I'm connecting with an inofficial JDBC driver. This is all to be implemented in jOOQ, a SQL abstraction layer in Java. So unfortunately, I cannot rely on possible UDFs, only on what's provided in SQLite core – Lukas Eder Jul 22 '12 at 10:55
  • Are you developing for jOOQ, or using the jOOQ api? Either way, I'm pretty sure you can use java UDFs... – Stobor Jul 22 '12 at 12:17
  • 1
    @Stobor: I'm the creator of jOOQ. Thus, I'd prefer not to create a dependency on this particular JDBC driver. But your solution is still quite nice for someone who might be using the jOOQ API. If those UDFs can be discovered using SQLite's pragmas, then jOOQ should support them natively! – Lukas Eder Jul 22 '12 at 12:18
  • No probs! Your question mostly just prompted me to figure out how to do this myself. (I've previously done it in Python so I suspected it should be possible.) jOOQ looks interesting, good luck with it. – Stobor Jul 22 '12 at 12:26
up vote 1 down vote accepted

A simpler version of @user610650's solution, using hex() instead of quote(), and works with string padding in addition to char padding:

X = padToLength
Y = padString
Z = expression

select
    Z ||
    substr(
        replace(
            hex(zeroblob(X)),
            '00',
            Y
        ),
        1,
        X - length(Z)
    );

Copied from http://verysimple.com/2010/01/12/sqlite-lpad-rpad-function/

-- the statement below is almost the same as
-- select lpad(mycolumn,'0',10) from mytable

select substr('0000000000' || mycolumn, -10, 10) from mytable

-- the statement below is almost the same as
-- select rpad(mycolumn,'0',10) from mytable

select substr(mycolumn || '0000000000', 1, 10) from mytable
  • We have a winner folks. – javadba Jun 18 '17 at 20:04

Here's more nastiness for you:

X = padToLength
Y = padString
Z = expression

RPAD (for LPAD, Z is concatenated after instead):

select 
    Z || 
    substr(
        replace(
            replace(
                substr(
                    quote(zeroblob(((X - length(Z) - 1 + length(Y)) / length(Y) + 1) / 2)), 
                    3
                ), 
                "'", 
                ""
            ), 
            "0", 
            Y
        ),
        1,
        (X - length(Z))
    )

Examples:

sqlite> select "foo" || replace(replace(substr(quote(zeroblob((2 + 1) / 2)), 3, (2 - length("foo"))), "'", ""), "0", "W");
foo
sqlite> select "foo" || replace(replace(substr(quote(zeroblob((7 + 1) / 2)), 3, (7 - length("foo"))), "'", ""), "0", "W");
fooWWWW

Sqlite is meant to be quite lightweight, so I have to disagree somewhat with your comment about being "surprised" by the lack of functionality. However, I agree that there should be a simpler way to do padding, if only because the trim functions exist.

  • Hah, well that looks quite crazy! I'll check later to see if this works :-) I know about being lightweight. But LPAD / RPAD can be coded in 10 lines of C code. On the other hand, I still fail to see a use-case for randomblob()... – Lukas Eder Jul 18 '12 at 15:48
  • you may want to lobby for it at sqlite-users@sqlite.org ;-) – user610650 Jul 18 '12 at 15:51
  • This really works! quote() did the magic although it didn't make things more readable when having to remove the X'...' stuff again... :) I'll award the bounty if no one comes up with any shorter solution (which I doubt). Anyway, your solution will make it into jOOQ, such that no future SQLite user will ever have to think about simulating LPAD and RPAD again! – Lukas Eder Jul 19 '12 at 19:18
  • @LukasEder: taz cool; is jOOQ some equivalent for EF in .Net? – user610650 Jul 19 '12 at 19:29
  • 1
    Indeed SQL doesn't make a difference between a character and strings; but for sure it can be done, it'll probably be just be nastier. – user610650 Jul 20 '12 at 7:44

A JDBC/custom functions approach (may not be suitable in your exact case, but might be able to be adapted). Uses inspiration from SqliteJDBC Custom Functions and the rightPad and leftPad functions from Apache commons.lang.StringUtils:

import java.sql.*;
import org.sqlite.Function;

public class Test 
{
  public static void main(String[] args) 
  {
    Connection conn = getConnection();

    conn.createStatement().execute("SELECT LPAD(t.column, t.character, t.repeat) FROM t");
    conn.createStatement().execute("SELECT RPAD(t.column, t.character, t.repeat) FROM t");

    conn.close();
  }

  public static Connection getConnection() 
  {
    Class.forName("org.sqlite.JDBC");
    Connection conn = DriverManager.getConnection("jdbc:sqlite:");

    /* Left Padding UDF  */
    Function.create(conn, "LPAD", new Function() 
      {
        protected void xFunc() throws SQLException 
        {
            String text = value_text(0);
            /* uses first character of supplied padding */
            char paddingCharacter = value_text(1).charAt(0);
            int repeat = value_int(2);

            int padLength = repeat - text.length();
            if(padLength <= 0)
            {
               result(text);
            }

            char[] padding = new char[padLength];
            Array.fill(padding, paddingCharacter);
            result(new String(padding).append(text));
        }
    });

    /* Right Padding UDF  */
    Function.create(conn, "RPAD", new Function() 
      {
        protected void xFunc() throws SQLException 
        {
            String text = value_text(0);
            /* uses first character of supplied padding */
            char paddingCharacter = value_text(1).charAt(0);
            int repeat = value_int(2);

            int padLength = repeat - text.length();
            if(padLength <= 0)
            {
               result(text);
            }

            char[] padding = new char[padLength];
            Array.fill(padding, paddingCharacter);
            result(text.append(new String(padding)));
        }
    });
  }
}

(Untested, off the cuff, doesn't handle nulls, etc, but should outline the idea...)

  • Very nice, I didn't know that was possible! In my particular case, I'm not sure if I want to create UDF's that are dependent on this JDBC driver's capabilities. But in general, it's a nice solution – Lukas Eder Jul 22 '12 at 12:17
  • @LukasEder: yeah, it's slightly less practical in a multi-purpose library, but there are some possibilities. If it's okay as a build-dependency but not a runtime dependency, then you could have a database specific "initializer" class, which is loaded (via reflection) if the connection class string matches "org.sqlite" or something. But yeah, it's not the only way, and if you have better methods, you could always use them instead. – Stobor Jul 22 '12 at 12:43

Her's a simple solution to pad 0-9 with a leading zero using CASE.

sqlite> select id,week,year from bulletin where id = 67;
67|2|2014

select id,CASE WHEN length(week) = 2 THEN week 
               ELSE '0'||week 
          END AS week,year from bulletin where id = 67;
67|02|2014
  • Yes that works for padding something to a fixed length. But even if this fixed length is, say, 10, this solution is going to blow up in verbosity... – Lukas Eder Nov 27 '13 at 12:32

Maybe like this:

  • LPAD(@orig_text, @padding_char, @padding_length):

    SELECT
      SUBSTR(
        REPLACE(
          CAST(ZEROBLOB(@padding_length) AS TEXT),
          CAST(ZEROBLOB(1) AS TEXT),
          @padding_char
        ) + @orig_text,
        -@padding_length,
        @paadding_length
      )
    
  • RPAD(@orig_text, @padding_char, @padding_length):

    SELECT
      SUBSTR(
        @orig_text + REPLACE(
          CAST(ZEROBLOB(@padding_length) AS TEXT),
          CAST(ZEROBLOB(1) AS TEXT),
          @padding_char
        ),
        1,
        @padding_length
      )
    
  • It's a nice idea, but it doesn't seem to work. Looks like casting a zeroblob(N) value to TEXT results in an "empty" string. In C strings are terminated by the 0x00 character, which is what's contained in the zeroblob :-( – Lukas Eder Jul 5 '11 at 6:39
  • @Lukas Eder: That's a pity. It's the only parametrisable thing I've been able to find so far. Sorry for disappointing you with that. – Andriy M Jul 5 '11 at 6:42
  • 1
    No worries, you're not disappointing me :) It's actually quite a creative solution. I'm just surprised time and again about the lack of functionality in SQLite. How can they have a useless randomblob() function, but no padding functions...? oh well – Lukas Eder Jul 5 '11 at 7:18

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