8

When using google style docstrings and type annotations there's a double up of the type hints.

Is there any community consensus on how to avoid this?

Annoying double up of types:

def sum(a: int, b: int) -> int:
    """ blah blah
    
    Args: 
        a (int): value 1
        b (int): value 2
    Returns:
        int: summed values
    """
    return a + b

Should types be left out of the docstring like this?

def sum(a: int, b: int) -> int:
    """ blah blah
    
    Args: 
        a: value 1
        b: value 2
    Returns:
       summed values
    """
    return a + b

I haven't seen anyone else mention this, but I can't be the only one unsure about the best approach here.

2 Answers 2

8

Yes, you only need the type hints OR the annotations in the Args and Returns, not both.


References

According to the Google Python Style Guide: "The description should include required type(s) if the code does not contain a corresponding type annotation."

The Sphinx Docs also encourage this in their example code:


def function_with_pep484_type_annotations(param1: int, param2: str) -> bool:
    """Example function with PEP 484 type annotations.

    Args:
        param1: The first parameter.
        param2: The second parameter.

    Returns:
        The return value. True for success, False otherwise.

    """
1
  • Doesn't work with any additional hints, ex. param1 (:obj:`int`, optional): Optional param - there is no way to write it without duplicating the type...
    – user64204
    Jan 28, 2022 at 14:18
1

This is very much IMHO, but I don't think enumerating all the parameters in the docstring has a lot of value if you have decent names and type annotations.

def sum(a: int, b: int) -> int:
    """Returns the result of adding the inputs together."""
    return a + b

is more than adequately clear IMO. In real life with this specific example I'd probably do:

def sum(a: int, b: int) -> int:
    """Does exactly what it says."""
    return a + b

Since the parameters are two ints, the result is another int, and the name of the function is sum which is a perfectly ordinary English word that means "the thing you get when you add other things together", I don't think any further explanation is necessary (other than perhaps a confirmation that this isn't a trick).

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