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I just read the Wikipedia article about duck typing, and I feel like I miss an important point about the interface concept I used to in Java:

"When I see a bird that walks like a duck and swims like a duck and quacks like a duck, I call that bird a duck."


class Duck:
    def quack(self):
        print("Quaaaaaack!")
    def feathers(self):
        print("The duck has white and gray feathers.")
    def swim(self):
        print("Swim seamlessly in the water")

class Person:
    def quack(self):
        print("The person imitates a duck.")
    def feathers(self):
        print("The person takes a feather from the ground and shows it.")
    def name(self):
        print("John Smith")

def in_the_forest(duck):
    duck.quack()
    duck.feathers()

def game():
    donald = Duck()
    john = Person()
    in_the_forest(donald)
    in_the_forest(john)

game()

what if, in in_the_forest, I write:

  • does it quack like a duck ? yes
  • does it have a duck feathers ? yes
  • great, it's a duck we've got !

and later, because I know it's a duck, I want it to swim? john will sink!

I don't want my application to crash (randomly) in the middle of its process just because John faked to be a duck, but I guess it wouldn't be a wise idea to check every single attributes of the object when I receive it ... ?

  • +1: well presented question – msw Jul 5 '11 at 12:45
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    In short, you don't worry. You write good tests that cover as many code paths and corner cases as humanly possible, but 100% security is never possible. And note that you can't have 100% security with Java or most other static type systems either ;) – user395760 Jul 5 '11 at 14:00
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    +1: a really well presented question about an important subject, with counts with great answers. Sorry I can just give it only 1 upvote. – Dave Jul 28 '17 at 17:03
20

Duck typing isn't really about checking whether the things you need are there and then using them. Duck typing is about just using what you need.

The in_the_forest function was written by a developer who was thinking about ducks. It was designed to operate on a Duck. A Duck can quack and feathers, so the coder used those features to get the job at hand done. In this case, the fact that a Duck can also swim wasn't used, and wasn't needed.

In a static language like Java, in_the_forest would have been declared to take a Duck. When the coder later discovered that they had a Person (which could also quack and feathers) and wanted to reuse the function, they're out of luck. Is a Person a subclass of Duck? No, that doesn't seem at all appropriate. Is there a QuacksAndFeathers interface? Maybe, if we're lucky. Otherwise we'll have to make one, go modify Duck to implement it, and modify in_the_forest to take a QuacksAndFeathers instead of a Duck. This may be impossible if Duck is in an external library.

In Python, you just pass your Person to in_the_forest and it works. Because it turns out in_the_forest doesn't need a Duck, it just needs a "duck-like" object, and in this case Person is sufficiently duck-like.

game though, needs a different definition of "duck-like", which is slightly stronger. Here, John Smith is out of luck.

Now, it's true that Java would have caught this error at compile time and Python won't. That can be viewed as a disadvantage. The pro-dynamic-typing counter argument is to say that any substantial body of code you write will always contain bugs that no compiler can catch (and to be honest, Java isn't even a particularly good example of a compiler with strong static checks to catch lots of bugs). So you need to test your code to find those bugs. And if you're testing for those bugs, you will trivially find bugs where you passed a Person to a function that needs a Duck. Given that, the dynamic-typist says, a language that tempts you into not testing because it finds some of your trivial bugs is actually a bad thing. And on top of that, it prevents you from doing some really useful things, like reusing the in_the_forest function on a Person.

Personally I'm torn in two directions. I really like Python with its flexible dynamic typing. And I really like Haskell and Mercury for their powerful static type systems. I'm not much of a fan of Java or C++; in my opinion they have all of the bad bits of static typing with few of the good bits.

  • 4
    Some people think of static typing as a kind of built-in unit testing system, but I don't really miss it. It's just like in real life: if a person wakes up in random collection of objects and looks over to see a duck sitting next to them, something went seriously wrong a good while back. – detly Jul 5 '11 at 13:17
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    Oh wait, I miss it when I want Eclipse's autocomplete to show me useful things. That's it. – detly Jul 5 '11 at 13:22
  • +1 with gratuitous soapbox: you want type safety in a language populated by ints? You need Pascal's ranged integer types if you don't want to see a duck sitting beside you (and no one wants ranged integers (and enums up to 2^16 would be silly)) – msw Jul 5 '11 at 14:10
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    a language that tempts you into not testing ... is a bad thing I think you're right with this point and I'll need to manage to turn my mind into it! – Kevin Jul 6 '11 at 7:53
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    Python doesn't stop you from omitting unit tests either. Does it suddenly stop to work if you don't include unit tests? Nope. Unit testing or not doesn't depend on the language (and even one of the most popular unit testing framework, jUnit, is written for Java). The pro-dynamic-typing counter argument is to say that any substantial body of code you write will always contain bugs that no compiler can catch: Just because we're gonna die one day, doesn't mean that we shouldn't try to live a healthy life. IMO, dynamic languages are pain in the ass when we try to start refactoring. – Pablo Espantoso May 6 '17 at 6:30
5

Can't speak for other languages, but in python it has been recently (v2.6) introduced the Abstract Base Classes (ABC) module.

If you read the rationale behind its introduction (PEP 3119) you will quickly realise that part of the reason was to "save john from sure death" or in other words, to facilitate the check on the fact when you program to an interface, all interface methods will be there. From the linked PEP:

ABCs are simply Python classes that are added into an object's inheritance tree to signal certain features of that object to an external inspector. Tests are done using isinstance(), and the presence of a particular ABC means that the test has passed. In addition, the ABCs define a minimal set of methods that establish the characteristic behavior of the type. Code that discriminates objects based on their ABC type can trust that those methods will always be present.

In general, you can apply the same pattern for your own code. For example: you can create a BasePlugin class with all the methods needed for a plugin to work, and you can then create several different plugins by subclassing it. Depending on whether each plugin must or can have those methods defined, you can define BasePlugin methods to silently pass (plugins can define those methods) or to raise an exception (plugins must define those methods / override the BasePlugin's one).

EDIT: In the thread of comments below, I have been suggested to include in the answer this bit of discussion:

This kind of features - at least in python - are not implemented for the sake of the human programmer (python never silence an error, so there's already plenty of feedback there), but rather for the sake of python own introspection capability (thus making easier to write dynamic loading, metaprogramming code, etc...). In other words: I know John can't fly... but I want the python interpreter to know it too! :)

  • Just because you can use Java-isms that simulate static typing doesn't mean that you ought. I've yet to see a non-toy class implementation whereby the user of a heterogeneous list doesn't already know whether John can fly. Furthermore, suppose your isinstance check fails, you have to cope with it anyway. How does this differ from an except block? ("Inheritance may be one of the most seductively overused features of OOP" -me) – msw Jul 5 '11 at 12:40
  • @msw - I don't know java so the parallel doesn't help me much understand your observation (I'm all ears if you have an opportunity to rephrase, though!). Keep in mind that most of this kind of features - at least in python - are not implemented for the sake of the human programmer (python never silence an error, so there's already plenty of feedback there), but rather for the sake of python own introspection capability (thus making easier to write dynamic loading, metaprogramming code, etc...). In other words: I know John can't fly... but I want the python interpreter to know it too! :) – mac Jul 5 '11 at 13:18
  • the Python interpreter does know it. I would have recapitulated my answer in stackoverflow.com/questions/6576837/… but felt that I was being a mite dogmatic today. My "Java-ism" could apply to many currently popular OOP languages (e.g. C++). I find dirtsimple.org/2004/12/python-is-not-java.html useful for breaking old mindsets. Your point regarding metaprogramming etc. should be more obvious than 'tis to the non-metaprogrammer (but so should C++ dynamic_casts (why is the feature there if not to use ;) ) – msw Jul 5 '11 at 14:00
  • Ben's answer better states my comments. – msw Jul 5 '11 at 14:05
  • @msw - done, thanks for the suggestion. – mac Jul 5 '11 at 14:12
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I don't want my application to crash (randomly) in the middle of its process just because John faked to be a duck, but I guess it wouldn't be a wise idea to check every single attributes of the object when I receive it ... ?

That's an issue of dynamic typing in general. In a statically typed language like Java, the compiler checks at compile time whether Person implements IDuck or not. In a dynamically typed language like Python, you get a run-time error if Person misses some particular duck feature (such as swim). To quote another Wikipedia article ("Type system", Section "Dynamic Typing"):

Dynamic typing may result in runtime type errors—that is, at runtime, a value may have an unexpected type, and an operation nonsensical for that type is applied. Such errors may occur long after the place where the programming mistake was made—that is, the place where the wrong type of data passed into a place it should not have. This may make the bug difficult to locate.

Dynamic typing has its drawbacks (you have mentioned one) and its advantages. A brief comparison can be found in another section of the Type system article in Wikipedia: Static and dynamic type checking in practice.

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