36

I'm trying to improve the performance of our application. We have a lot of Activator.CreateInstance calls that are causing some grief.

We instantiate a lot of classes based on an interface (ITabDocument) and after looking around I thought of using this code:

The code is no better (infact marginally slower) than using the Activator.CreateInstance code we had.

    public static Func<T> CreateInstance<T>(Type objType) where T : class, new()
    {
        var dynMethod = new DynamicMethod("DM$OBJ_FACTORY_" + objType.Name, objType, null, objType);
        ILGenerator ilGen = dynMethod.GetILGenerator();
        ilGen.Emit(OpCodes.Newobj, objType.GetConstructor(Type.EmptyTypes));
        ilGen.Emit(OpCodes.Ret);
        return (Func<T>)dynMethod.CreateDelegate(typeof(Func<T>));
    }

I'm wondering why this is, all I'm doing is:

ITabDocument document = CreateInstance<ITabDocument>(Type.GetType("[Company].Something"));

Is there a better way of creating objects which would assist with the above? Its a little hard when you're not sure of the concrete type.

  • 11
    How often are you calling CreateInstance - because the whole point of that is that you'd call CreateInstance once but then remember the factory delegate. If you're calling CreateInstance on each operation, then yes, it'll be slower... – Jon Skeet Jul 5 '11 at 12:00
  • 2
    Some design patterns may help you, like factory method, abstract factory and similar creational patterns. They allow you to late bind your objects. You could look here: oodesign.com – Nickolodeon Jul 5 '11 at 12:03
  • @Jon Skeet Thanks for replying, I'm calling it at least 20-30 times as we need to create that many tabbed documents at start and they're all different implementations of ITabbedDocument. – Tiffany Townsend Jul 5 '11 at 12:25
  • @Tiffany: But are they all different types? That's the important thing - you should only call that method once per type. – Jon Skeet Jul 5 '11 at 12:27
  • Oops, yes they are all different types. I've edited my example – Tiffany Townsend Jul 5 '11 at 12:41
53

I did some benchmarking between these (I would write down the bare minimum details):

public static T Instance() //~1800 ms
{
    return new T();
}

public static T Instance() //~1800 ms
{
    return new Activator.CreateInstance<T>();
}

public static readonly Func<T> Instance = () => new T(); //~1800 ms

public static readonly Func<T> Instance = () => 
                                 Activator.CreateInstance<T>(); //~1800 ms

//works for types with no default constructor as well
public static readonly Func<T> Instance = () => 
               (T)FormatterServices.GetUninitializedObject(typeof(T)); //~2000 ms


public static readonly Func<T> Instance = 
     Expression.Lambda<Func<T>>(Expression.New(typeof(T))).Compile();  
     //~50 ms for classes and ~100 ms for structs

As CD says compiled expression is the fastest, and by a big margin. All the methods except (T)FormatterServices.GetUninitializedObject(typeof(T)) work only for types with default constructor.

And caching the compiled resultant delegate is trivial when you have a static class per generic type. Like:

public static class New<T> where T : new()
{
    public static readonly Func<T> Instance = Expression.Lambda<Func<T>>
                                              (
                                               Expression.New(typeof(T))
                                              ).Compile();
}

Note the new constraint. Call anything

MyType me = New<MyType>.Instance();

Except for the first time the class is being loaded in memory, the execution is going to be fastest.

To have a class that handles both types with default constructor and without, I took a hybrid approach, from here:

public static class New<T>
{
    public static readonly Func<T> Instance = Creator();

    static Func<T> Creator()
    {
        Type t = typeof(T);
        if (t == typeof(string))
            return Expression.Lambda<Func<T>>(Expression.Constant(string.Empty)).Compile();

        if (t.HasDefaultConstructor())
            return Expression.Lambda<Func<T>>(Expression.New(t)).Compile();

        return () => (T)FormatterServices.GetUninitializedObject(t);
    }
}

public static bool HasDefaultConstructor(this Type t)
{
    return t.IsValueType || t.GetConstructor(Type.EmptyTypes) != null;
}

Will handle value types too in an efficient manner.

Note that (T)FormatterServices.GetUninitializedObject(t) will fail for string. Hence special handling for string is in place to return empty string.

| improve this answer | |
  • And how would this apply to creating an object whose type is only known at runtime as per the question? The question's use of generics is only for casting the returned object to a base class. In the example you have provided, the type of the instance returned is the same as the generic parameter and thus a normal constructor could be used (excepting the fact that it can also create an uninitialized object). – Richard Collette Jun 13 '13 at 16:35
  • @RichardCollette I agree its not directly answering the question but shows a way to have nice little helper class (the class is incomplete, hopefully I will update it a day). Nonetheless, it isn't too difficult to fine tune that to workable solution for OP (just use provided type instead of typeof(T)). – nawfal Jun 13 '13 at 18:30
  • 1
    The first one, the simple generic, new T()... It cannot be correct. This cannot be slower than the lambda version at the end. This should be as fast as a non-generic constructor, as generics are handled at compile time. Can you double check it? It's important, because it places doubt on all results in your otherwise excellent post! – Timo Feb 20 '17 at 12:21
  • @Timo depends on what you mean by "generics are handled at compile time". Some static checking is done, sure. But T will always have the runtime type. I think compiler should be smart enough to not rely on reflection in generic case but unfortunately it does. That's the whole point. You can also confirm this by inspecting IL. – nawfal Feb 20 '17 at 13:18
  • 1
    Read this blog codeblog.jonskeet.uk/2011/08/22/… from Jon Skeet. And also the various benchmarks by users in comments all which verifies my results. Also note my comment in that blog which highlights how behaviour changed in Roslyn which is even slower now. – nawfal Feb 20 '17 at 13:18
22

This might help: Don’t use Activator.CreateInstance or ConstructorInfo.Invoke, use compiled lambda expressions:

// Make a NewExpression that calls the ctor with the args we just created
NewExpression newExp = Expression.New(ctor, argsExp);                  

// Create a lambda with the New expression as body and our param object[] as arg
LambdaExpression lambda = Expression.Lambda(typeof(ObjectActivator), newExp, param);            


// Compile it
ObjectActivator compiled = (ObjectActivator)lambda.Compile();
| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks, I saw this earlier but wasn't sure whether I can call it adhoc like I'd need. – Tiffany Townsend Jul 5 '11 at 12:27
  • 1
    Thanks for the link, it leads onto this blog rogeralsing.com/2008/02/28/linq-expressions-creating-objects which I've been reading and I think it may now be one of the best blogs I've ever seen. Thank you so much – RichK Jul 5 '11 at 15:18
  • 2
    Whilst this may theoretically answer the question, it would be preferable to include the essential parts of the answer here, and provide the link for reference. Please edit your answer to correct this, then flag it as "in need of moderator intervention" and request un-deletion. – Matt Nov 1 '16 at 13:11
  • This is at least an order of magnitude faster, well worth it! – jjxtra Feb 22 at 20:45
8

The problem is if your are going to call CreateInstance over and over again directly rather than saving the result somewhere and using that result over and over again, you should probably just go ahead and do you caching inside of it.

internal static class DelegateStore<T> {
     internal static IDictionary<string, Func<T>> Store = new ConcurrentDictionary<string,Func<T>>();
}

public static T CreateInstance<T>(Type objType) where T : class
{
    Func<T> returnFunc;
    if(!DelegateStore<T>.Store.TryGetValue(objType.FullName, out returnFunc)) {
        var dynMethod = new DynamicMethod("DM$OBJ_FACTORY_" + objType.Name, objType, null, objType);
        ILGenerator ilGen = dynMethod.GetILGenerator();
        ilGen.Emit(OpCodes.Newobj, objType.GetConstructor(Type.EmptyTypes));
        ilGen.Emit(OpCodes.Ret);
        returnFunc = (Func<T>)dynMethod.CreateDelegate(typeof(Func<T>));
        DelegateStore<T>.Store[objType.FullName] = returnFunc;
    }
    return returnFunc();
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    You actually don't need a dictionary in your DelegateStore<T> class at all because that generic class automatically gets a unique per-T instantiation already. This is true even though it is a static class. So all you need in DelegateStore<T> is simply internal static Func<T> _cached_func; As you have it, you're creating many dictionaries--a new one for every T--each containing just one single cached delegate. – Glenn Slayden Dec 13 '18 at 23:10
6

December 13th, 2019
nawfal's answer benchmarked

Benchmarked in NetCore3.1, was just seeing how necessary this was still.

[MemoryDiagnoser, ThreadingDiagnoser]
[SimpleJob(runtimeMoniker: RuntimeMoniker.NetCoreApp31)]
[GenericTypeArguments(typeof(TestClass))]
public class ActivatorBenchmark<T> where T : new()
{
    [Benchmark(Baseline = true)]
    [Arguments(1_000)]
    [Arguments(1_000_000)]
    [Arguments(100_000_000)]

    public void ActivatorTest1(int x)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < x; i++)
        {
            var t = new T();
        }
    }

    [Benchmark]
    [Arguments(1_000)]
    [Arguments(1_000_000)]
    [Arguments(100_000_000)]
    public void ActivatorTest2(int x)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < x; i++)
        {
            var t = New<T>.Instance();
        }
    }
}

public class TestClass
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Email { get; set; }
}

public static class TestHelpers
{
    public static class New<T>
    {
        public static readonly Func<T> Instance = Creator();

        private static Func<T> Creator()
        {
            Type t = typeof(T);
            if (t == typeof(string))
                return Expression.Lambda<Func<T>>(Expression.Constant(string.Empty)).Compile();

            if (t.HasDefaultConstructor())
                return Expression.Lambda<Func<T>>(Expression.New(t)).Compile();

            return () => (T)FormatterServices.GetUninitializedObject(t);
        }
    }

    public static bool HasDefaultConstructor(this Type t)
    {
        return t.IsValueType || t.GetConstructor(Type.EmptyTypes) != null;
    }
}

.

// * Detailed results *
ActivatorBenchmark<TestClass>.ActivatorTest1: Job-RRTXQH(Runtime=.NET Core 3.1) [x=1000]
Runtime = .NET Core 3.1.0 (CoreCLR 4.700.19.56402, CoreFX 4.700.19.56404), X64 RyuJIT; GC = Concurrent Workstation
Mean = 30.9925 us, StdErr = 0.1962 us (0.63%); N = 17, StdDev = 0.8088 us
Min = 30.2190 us, Q1 = 30.4151 us, Median = 30.4745 us, Q3 = 31.5188 us, Max = 32.7203 us
IQR = 1.1037 us, LowerFence = 28.7595 us, UpperFence = 33.1744 us
ConfidenceInterval = [30.2049 us; 31.7802 us] (CI 99.9%), Margin = 0.7876 us (2.54% of Mean)
Skewness = 0.96, Kurtosis = 2.4, MValue = 2
-------------------- Histogram --------------------
[29.944 us ; 30.909 us) | @@@@@@@@@@@
[30.909 us ; 31.555 us) | @@
[31.555 us ; 32.301 us) | @@
[32.301 us ; 32.996 us) | @@
---------------------------------------------------

ActivatorBenchmark<TestClass>.ActivatorTest2: Job-RRTXQH(Runtime=.NET Core 3.1) [x=1000]
Runtime = .NET Core 3.1.0 (CoreCLR 4.700.19.56402, CoreFX 4.700.19.56404), X64 RyuJIT; GC = Concurrent Workstation
Mean = 7.0534 us, StdErr = 0.0144 us (0.20%); N = 14, StdDev = 0.0538 us
Min = 6.9228 us, Q1 = 7.0269 us, Median = 7.0687 us, Q3 = 7.0849 us, Max = 7.1367 us
IQR = 0.0580 us, LowerFence = 6.9399 us, UpperFence = 7.1718 us
ConfidenceInterval = [6.9927 us; 7.1142 us] (CI 99.9%), Margin = 0.0607 us (0.86% of Mean)
Skewness = -0.76, Kurtosis = 3.12, MValue = 2
-------------------- Histogram --------------------
[6.903 us ; 7.148 us) | @@@@@@@@@@@@@@
---------------------------------------------------

ActivatorBenchmark<TestClass>.ActivatorTest1: Job-RRTXQH(Runtime=.NET Core 3.1) [x=1000000]
Runtime = .NET Core 3.1.0 (CoreCLR 4.700.19.56402, CoreFX 4.700.19.56404), X64 RyuJIT; GC = Concurrent Workstation
Mean = 27.6912 ms, StdErr = 0.0412 ms (0.15%); N = 13, StdDev = 0.1486 ms
Min = 27.5318 ms, Q1 = 27.6171 ms, Median = 27.6435 ms, Q3 = 27.7196 ms, Max = 28.0946 ms
IQR = 0.1025 ms, LowerFence = 27.4633 ms, UpperFence = 27.8734 ms
ConfidenceInterval = [27.5132 ms; 27.8691 ms] (CI 99.9%), Margin = 0.1780 ms (0.64% of Mean)
Skewness = 1.56, Kurtosis = 4.57, MValue = 2
-------------------- Histogram --------------------
[27.477 ms ; 28.150 ms) | @@@@@@@@@@@@@
---------------------------------------------------

ActivatorBenchmark<TestClass>.ActivatorTest2: Job-RRTXQH(Runtime=.NET Core 3.1) [x=1000000]
Runtime = .NET Core 3.1.0 (CoreCLR 4.700.19.56402, CoreFX 4.700.19.56404), X64 RyuJIT; GC = Concurrent Workstation
Mean = 7.0697 ms, StdErr = 0.0239 ms (0.34%); N = 15, StdDev = 0.0927 ms
Min = 6.9195 ms, Q1 = 6.9889 ms, Median = 7.0681 ms, Q3 = 7.1187 ms, Max = 7.2497 ms
IQR = 0.1298 ms, LowerFence = 6.7942 ms, UpperFence = 7.3134 ms
ConfidenceInterval = [6.9706 ms; 7.1687 ms] (CI 99.9%), Margin = 0.0991 ms (1.40% of Mean)
Skewness = 0.22, Kurtosis = 2.08, MValue = 2
-------------------- Histogram --------------------
[6.887 ms ; 7.252 ms) | @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
---------------------------------------------------

ActivatorBenchmark<TestClass>.ActivatorTest1: Job-RRTXQH(Runtime=.NET Core 3.1) [x=100000000]
Runtime = .NET Core 3.1.0 (CoreCLR 4.700.19.56402, CoreFX 4.700.19.56404), X64 RyuJIT; GC = Concurrent Workstation
Mean = 2.7852 s, StdErr = 0.0093 s (0.33%); N = 15, StdDev = 0.0358 s
Min = 2.7426 s, Q1 = 2.7576 s, Median = 2.7693 s, Q3 = 2.8141 s, Max = 2.8629 s
IQR = 0.0565 s, LowerFence = 2.6728 s, UpperFence = 2.8989 s
ConfidenceInterval = [2.7469 s; 2.8235 s] (CI 99.9%), Margin = 0.0383 s (1.38% of Mean)
Skewness = 0.76, Kurtosis = 2.21, MValue = 2
-------------------- Histogram --------------------
[2.735 s ; 2.796 s) | @@@@@@@@@@
[2.796 s ; 2.876 s) | @@@@@
---------------------------------------------------

ActivatorBenchmark<TestClass>.ActivatorTest2: Job-RRTXQH(Runtime=.NET Core 3.1) [x=100000000]
Runtime = .NET Core 3.1.0 (CoreCLR 4.700.19.56402, CoreFX 4.700.19.56404), X64 RyuJIT; GC = Concurrent Workstation
Mean = 698.4029 ms, StdErr = 1.3760 ms (0.20%); N = 15, StdDev = 5.3292 ms
Min = 688.2649 ms, Q1 = 693.8483 ms, Median = 697.9546 ms, Q3 = 703.2100 ms, Max = 707.1939 ms
IQR = 9.3617 ms, LowerFence = 679.8057 ms, UpperFence = 717.2526 ms
ConfidenceInterval = [692.7056 ms; 704.1001 ms] (CI 99.9%), Margin = 5.6972 ms (0.82% of Mean)
Skewness = 0.09, Kurtosis = 2.08, MValue = 2
-------------------- Histogram --------------------
[686.374 ms ; 709.085 ms) | @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
---------------------------------------------------

// * Summary *

BenchmarkDotNet=v0.12.0, OS=Windows 10.0.18362
Intel Core i9-9980HK CPU 2.40GHz, 1 CPU, 16 logical and 8 physical cores
.NET Core SDK=3.1.100
  [Host]     : .NET Core 3.1.0 (CoreCLR 4.700.19.56402, CoreFX 4.700.19.56404), X64 RyuJIT
  Job-RRTXQH : .NET Core 3.1.0 (CoreCLR 4.700.19.56402, CoreFX 4.700.19.56404), X64 RyuJIT

Runtime=.NET Core 3.1

|         Method |         x |             Mean |          Error |         StdDev | Ratio | Completed Work Items | Lock Contentions |       Gen 0 |     Gen 1 | Gen 2 |    Allocated |
|--------------- |---------- |-----------------:|---------------:|---------------:|------:|---------------------:|-----------------:|------------:|----------:|------:|-------------:|
| ActivatorTest1 |      1000 |        30.993 us |      0.7876 us |      0.8088 us |  1.00 |               0.0001 |                - |      4.7607 |         - |     - |     39.06 KB |
| ActivatorTest2 |      1000 |         7.053 us |      0.0607 us |      0.0538 us |  0.23 |               0.0000 |                - |      4.7760 |         - |     - |     39.06 KB |
|                |           |                  |                |                |       |                      |                  |             |           |       |              |
| ActivatorTest1 |   1000000 |    27,691.175 us |    177.9530 us |    148.5988 us |  1.00 |               0.0625 |                - |   4781.2500 |         - |     - |  39064.19 KB |
| ActivatorTest2 |   1000000 |     7,069.695 us |     99.0538 us |     92.6550 us |  0.26 |               0.0156 |                - |   4781.2500 |         - |     - |   39062.5 KB |
|                |           |                  |                |                |       |                      |                  |             |           |       |              |
| ActivatorTest1 | 100000000 | 2,785,181.093 us | 38,325.0183 us | 35,849.2459 us |  1.00 |               2.0000 |                - | 478000.0000 | 2000.0000 |     - | 3906418.4 KB |
| ActivatorTest2 | 100000000 |   698,402.860 us |  5,697.2360 us |  5,329.1981 us |  0.25 |               2.0000 |                - | 478000.0000 |         - |     - |   3906250 KB |

// * Hints *
Outliers
  ActivatorBenchmark<TestClass>.ActivatorTest2: Runtime=.NET Core 3.1 -> 1 outlier  was  removed, 2 outliers were detected (6.92 us, 9.73 us)
  ActivatorBenchmark<TestClass>.ActivatorTest1: Runtime=.NET Core 3.1 -> 2 outliers were removed (28.56 ms, 29.78 ms)

// * Legends *
  x                    : Value of the 'x' parameter
  Mean                 : Arithmetic mean of all measurements
  Error                : Half of 99.9% confidence interval
  StdDev               : Standard deviation of all measurements
  Ratio                : Mean of the ratio distribution ([Current]/[Baseline])
  Completed Work Items : The number of work items that have been processed in ThreadPool (per single operation)
  Lock Contentions     : The number of times there was contention upon trying to take a Monitor's lock (per single operation)
  Gen 0                : GC Generation 0 collects per 1000 operations
  Gen 1                : GC Generation 1 collects per 1000 operations
  Gen 2                : GC Generation 2 collects per 1000 operations
  Allocated            : Allocated memory per single operation (managed only, inclusive, 1KB = 1024B)
  1 us                 : 1 Microsecond (0.000001 sec)

// * Diagnostic Output - ThreadingDiagnoser *

// * Diagnostic Output - MemoryDiagnoser *
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    seems things have hardly changed a bit =/ – Kerry Dec 23 '19 at 8:35
3

You're probably getting some overhead from the generation of the same code.

The ILGenerator dynamically creates code for the factory.

Create somekind of map or Dictionary of types you've already used, and keep the factory method created for that type.

| improve this answer | |
0

Generic method for constructing delegates, calling constructor directly. Automatically searches constructor in given type with signature of given delegate type and constructs delegate of that type. Code here:

/// <summary>
/// Reflective object construction helper.
/// All methods are thread safe.
/// </summary>
public static class Constructor
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Searches an instanceType constructor with delegateType-matching signature and constructs delegate of delegateType creating new instance of instanceType.
    /// Instance is casted to delegateTypes's return type. 
    /// Delegate's return type must be assignable from instanceType.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="delegateType">Type of delegate, with constructor-corresponding signature to be constructed.</param>
    /// <param name="instanceType">Type of instance to be constructed.</param>
    /// <returns>Delegate of delegateType wich constructs instance of instanceType by calling corresponding instanceType constructor.</returns>
    public static Delegate Compile(Type delegateType,Type instanceType)
    {
        if (!typeof(Delegate).IsAssignableFrom(delegateType))
        {
            throw new ArgumentException(String.Format("{0} is not a Delegate type.",delegateType.FullName),"delegateType");
        }
        var invoke = delegateType.GetMethod("Invoke");
        var parameterTypes = invoke.GetParameters().Select(pi => pi.ParameterType).ToArray();
        var resultType = invoke.ReturnType;
        if(!resultType.IsAssignableFrom(instanceType))
        {
            throw new ArgumentException(String.Format("Delegate's return type ({0}) is not assignable from {1}.",resultType.FullName,instanceType.FullName));
        }
        var ctor = instanceType.GetConstructor(
            BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.NonPublic, null, parameterTypes, null);
        if(ctor == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("Can't find constructor with delegate's signature","instanceType");
        }
        var parapeters = parameterTypes.Select(Expression.Parameter).ToArray();

        var newExpression = Expression.Lambda(delegateType,
            Expression.Convert(Expression.New(ctor, parapeters), resultType),
            parapeters);
        var @delegate = newExpression.Compile();
        return @delegate;
    }
    public static TDelegate Compile<TDelegate>(Type instanceType)
    {
        return (TDelegate) (object) Compile(typeof (TDelegate), instanceType);
    }
}

is part of Yappi project's sources. Using it you can construct delegate calling any constructor of given type, including constructor with parameters (except ref and out parameters).

Sample usage:

var newList = Constructor.Compile<Func<int, IList<String>>>(typeof (List<String>));
var list = newList(100);

After construction of delegate, store it somewhere in static dictionary or in static field of class with generic parameter. Don't construct new delegate each time. Use one delegate for constructing multiple instances of given type.

| improve this answer | |

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