2

I get a resharper warning

enter image description here

The NotNull used to work, I wonder if it the nullable reference type compiler support (We havent enabled nullable support in this project, but the GetManifestResourceStream methods returns a nullable reference type

public virtual Stream? GetManifestResourceStream(string name) { throw NotImplemented.ByDesign; }

My code

public static T NotNull<T>(this T source) where T : class
{
    if (source == null) throw new NullReferenceException($"{typeof(T).FullName}: Expected reference type that is not null");

    return source;
}

edit: This seems to work

#nullable enable
public static T NotNull<T>(this T? source) where T : class
{
    if (source == null) throw new NullReferenceException($"{typeof(T).FullName}: Expected reference type that is not null");

    return source;
}
10
  • Why do you throw NullReferenceException? Why don't you use ArgumentNullException? Commented Jan 21, 2021 at 11:09
  • Doesnt matter really. Its just syntax sugar for the compiler/resharper not to throw warnings.
    – Anders
    Commented Jan 21, 2021 at 11:26
  • The caller except it to be not null btw, so its more a null reference exception than argument exception. Since this is a helper extension method
    – Anders
    Commented Jan 21, 2021 at 11:27
  • 1
    You can use ! to suppress nullable warnings -- that's cleaner, if you're throwing an exception either way
    – canton7
    Commented Jan 21, 2021 at 11:28
  • Cool I have missed that keyword., The NotNull orginally came from we had nullable structs that was not null known by domain because of the state it was in.
    – Anders
    Commented Jan 21, 2021 at 11:33

1 Answer 1

2

If you're just looking to get rid of the nullable warnings, and throw an exception either way, you might as well just use the null-forgiving operator !:

await stream!.CopyToAsync(memory);

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