1

How to define and initialize an object that can be empty.

With types

type Plan = 'plan1' | 'plan1';

interface IPlan {
    name: string
}

When I tried to initialize an empty object, I'm getting an error

const plans: Record<Plan, Readonly<IPlan> = {}; // **ERROR HERE**

plans.plan1 = {
    name: 'Plan #1'
}

Property 'plan1' is missing in type '{}' but required in type 'Record<"plan1", Readonly>'.

Playgro

1
  • What's your full use case? The empty object {} is not of type Record<Plan, Readonly<IPlan>. Why dont you go with const plan1 = { name: "Plan #1" } and then const plans = { plan1 }? Asked differently: Why do you need to initialize empty, then manually fill it instead of directly declaring the full plans object you want in the end? – Garlef Wegart Jan 22 at 7:54
1

Simply use the Partial utility type: Partial<Type>

type Plan = 'plan1' | 'plan1';

interface IPlan {
    name: string
}


const plans: Partial<Record<Plan, IPlan>> = {}; // no error

plans.plan1 = {
    name: 'Plan #1'
}

The downside of this approach is that now all the properties of your interface are optional. But since you want it to instantiate without the required property, that is the only way.

Playground Link

Another idea might be using the Omit utility type: Omit<Type, Keys>

interface Plan {
  name: string;
}

type IPlan = Omit<Plan , "name">;

const plans: IPlan = {};

So, again, you can instantiate without the required properties.

Playground Link

3

You could do something like:

type Plan = 'plan1' | 'plan2';

interface IPlan {
    name: string
}

type PlansRecord = Record<Plan, Readonly<IPlan>>
const plansRecord = {} as PlansRecord

console.log({plansRecord})

Output: [LOG]: { "plansRecord": {} }

Demo

1
  • I'm not sure if this is a good idea. At least it should only be used locally (for example in a function that builds up such an object and then returns it). Otherwise if you pass around plansRecord to other parts of your codebase you can not trust the typings and might run into unexpecet errors down the line. – Garlef Wegart Jan 22 at 8:00
-2

Looking at the documentation for Typescript's Record, it looks like they require a more elaborate object definition:

const plans: Record<Plan, Readonly<IPlan>> = {plan1: {name: 'foo'}, plan2: {name:'bar'}}

or:

  const plans: Record<Plan, Readonly<IPlan>> = {plan1: {name: 'foo'}}

If you're just trying to create an element with types, you could just use a class or interface with Optional Properties (see here). for example:

interface IPlan {
    name?: string;
}
1
  • That's exactly what I need.. more elaborate object. The definition that is an object with plan1 or plan2 property or an empty one {} like... { plan1: {name: 1} } or { plan1: {name: 'foo'}, plan2: {name: 'bar'} } or even {} – ridermansb Jan 21 at 19:32

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