1

Let's say I have a class that declares a local type like this:

type
  TAncestor = class
    type
      TLocalType = (just, some, example); 
  end;

Then, I want to use that local type in a subclass. However, the following doesn't compile.

type
  TChild = class (TAncestor)
    procedure Test (AVariable: TLocalType);  // error: undeclared identifier: 'TLocalType'
  end;

In order to use the type, it seems a fully qualified type name is needed. The following compiles:

type
  TChild = class (TAncestor)
    procedure Test (AVariable: TAncestor.TLocalType);
  end;

While this works, it feels rather unelegant. (Also, if I ever want to change the ancestor of TChild, I'd have to change the class name in both lines.) I'm probably missing something; what's the reason for the type declaration not simply being inherited from the ancestor?

1
  • I'm afraid the reason is really boring: this is the way the language (or, specifically, the compiler) is designed at the moment. – Andreas Rejbrand Jan 23 at 15:14
0

The type is actually inherited. You can access it by qualifying the identifier with the child class in addition to the ancestor class:

You can also use TChild.TLocalType:

TAncestor = class
type
    TLocalType = (just, some, example);
end;

TChild = class (TAncestor)
    procedure Test (AVariable: TChild.TLocalType);
end;

Why is it like that? Because of a design choice at Embarcadero.

2
  • 6
    The question asks why the language is designed this way. It does not ask for alternatives. This might have been a comment. I recommend deleting the answer and converting into a comment. – David Heffernan Jan 23 at 16:18
  • Ah, okay. I was afraid of missing a potential situation in which inheriting the type could cause problems. So the type is actually inherited, and the compiler just doesn't recognize it. Thank you all for taking your time to explain. – Valerian K. Jan 24 at 20:53

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